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CIH 770 offset disc


Mountain Heritage
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Wondering what these are like? Quality,  results, good/bad, hp/ft required in clay/loan soils, no hills (both tiled drained and untiled).  Main purpose would be to work in corn stalks that have been chopped with #50 stalk chopper (picked corn with 1640 combine).

What do you like or dislike about these?  Do you find they ridge bad?

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4 minutes ago, Mountain Heritage said:

Wondering what these are like? Quality,  results, good/bad, hp/ft required in clay/loan soils, no hills (both tiled drained and untiled).  Main purpose would be to work in corn stalks that have been chopped with #50 stalk chopper (picked corn with 1640 combine).

What do you like or dislike about these?  Do you find they ridge bad?

Any offset disc will ridge worse than a normal disc typically they pull harder also depending on what size your looking for also I had a 16 ft offset years ago pulled it with a 275 hp four wheel drive tractor which handled it pretty well my offset had 24 inch blades and would really tear up the ground if you let it 

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17 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

Any offset disc will ridge worse than a normal disc typically they pull harder also depending on what size your looking for also I had a 16 ft offset years ago pulled it with a 275 hp four wheel drive tractor which handled it pretty well my offset had 24 inch blades and would really tear up the ground if you let it 

Likely only looking about 10 foot set?  Only have 100hp 4wd and a 110hp 2wd to pull with.  Really didn't want to have to hook them together. 

Regular 495 discs won't put enough stalks under ground, tried them already.  Just trying to get away from using plow for every field.

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What was difference between 770 and 780 models?

 

Yes, tried chisel plow last year, didn't work well.

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The price of used ones is always high when I see them advertised. With the price compared to other brands, must be able to adjust so they don't ridge. The operators of irrigated laser leveled vegetable fields will not put up with ridges, and don't see many the big land plains being used like the old days. 

One neighbor has one but has been to till and has not used it in years. I think it was a 12 foot and pulled it with a JD 4230.

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Just out of curiosity, why didn't the chisel get it done?  Seems like in chopped stalks even an older model like our early 70s DMI Chisel Champ does a nice job of covering trash, especially with twisted shovels.

Disk them first to size and pin some of the trash down and it works well also.  

 

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I don't know, offsets create lots of compaction below. Local SWCS board member rented one when the '85 farm bill gave you time to decide what tool you wanted to use to get in compliance on HEL ground. He said he had absolutely no drainage from using it. Sealed her off at the bottom of the cut 

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4 hours ago, Mr. Plow said:

Just out of curiosity, why didn't the chisel get it done?  Seems like in chopped stalks even an older model like our early 70s DMI Chisel Champ does a nice job of covering trash, especially with twisted shovels.

Disk them first to size and pin some of the trash down and it works well also.  

 

With the chisel plow, we found there was a lot of stalks on top of the ground still - way more than we wanted.  I know the all mighty politically correct police will hate this.....  We want more ground than stalks showing when done.  It helps us out significantly in the spring time to get on the land quicker because the soil is warming quicker.  So with untiled land that is huge plus.  It helps us plant our higher hu varieties and able to push the yields we are looking for.

32 minutes ago, 856 Custom said:

I don't know, offsets create lots of compaction below. Local SWCS board member rented one when the '85 farm bill gave you time to decide what tool you wanted to use to get in compliance on HEL ground. He said he had absolutely no drainage from using it. Sealed her off at the bottom of the cut 

Not to sound like a total moron - if the ground isn't wet, how does the discs cause so much compaction?  Just curious what the difference is between it and using a 3 or 4 bottom plow?  I'm not mocking what you are saying - just trying to understand how they are working and what they are doing to the soil?

 

If was to buy one, think it would be a Sunflower or an IH if the tractors could pull it - they just seem to be WAY more of a disc than others.  Well built and simple.  Doesn't seem like it would fall apart after the first 2 acres

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2 hours ago, 856 Custom said:

I don't know, offsets create lots of compaction below. Local SWCS board member rented one when the '85 farm bill gave you time to decide what tool you wanted to use to get in compliance on HEL ground. He said he had absolutely no drainage from using it. Sealed her off at the bottom of the cut 

They were popular here a few years till we noticed we were turning low areas into ponds. They probly would have been ok if guys were patient enough to wait till its dry enough. Seems like about the most forgiving primary tillage tool as far as running in to wet conditions is just the plain old common chiesel plow, think IH 55. Just a light weight tool you use that "lifts" the soil. That said i just bought an offset disk last year. I had used this particular disk 10 yrs ago to mulch up any trees and brush my old MF 1805 would run over in reclaiming some 20 yr crp land. This yr i had 3 more fields on the same farm, 30 yrs of crp probly not mowed last 20, that i mulched with it. I went to see the owner to ask about renting it and asked if he would consider selling it. I was the last one to use it 10 yrs ago and he refused to take payment then. It is as wide as tractor with 24.5x32 duals, rockflex, 26 in blades, tires hold air ok [duals], never been in a shed, Amco. He wanted $1000 so i bought it. Will use it this week to level out a wide fence row i tore out. Did not purchase it with intent to run it over whole fields, just land clearing duty as i have about 6 more areas to "reclaim" to cropland over the next few yrs.

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2 hours ago, Mountain Heritage said:

With the chisel plow, we found there was a lot of stalks on top of the ground still - way more than we wanted. 

We're you running straight, or twisted shovels?  I'm betting you did not have twisted shovel. Twisted buries fodder very well.  

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13 hours ago, Mountain Heritage said:

Wondering what these are like?

Pretty well worn. I haven't come across one with discs anywhere near the 24" stated earlier. Usually they're around 16", so they don't work any better than your 495 disc.

So you can either replace all the discs or look for one that isn't worn out. The ones that aren't worn out aren't for sale, usually.

Has anyone tried an "Industrias Americas" heavy offset disc? They're made in Mexico I think, reasonably priced compared to the big brands, and available in smaller sizes for smaller farmers.

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I have had one for years.  Good and well built.  The newer ones are realllly heavy, mine is a 80s IH model 770 12'.  The MX 170 pulled it like nothing for years.  On peat works nice since it sinks and almost plows.  I can see packing down since they are heavy and all them points psi.  But if not wet and NOT in particular soils be fine.  But I do like a Disc Chisel plow for your idea.  I dont have one, neighbor does and it does a really good job in the spring behing corn silage any ways

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8 hours ago, J-Mech said:

We're you running straight, or twisted shovels?  I'm betting you did not have twisted shovel. Twisted buries fodder very well.  

I was wondering the same thing.  We used to run a Glencoe SoilSaver with twisted shovels.  It would get things pretty black.  We never chopped stalks, usually didn't plug unless you you had a lot of foxtail.  With today's higher populations and hybrids it doesn't have enough clearance.  Just my opinion, take it for what it's worth (nothing).  But I think chopping stalks is a time and fuel waster.  There are tools out there that will do what you want and don't require that extra trip across the field.

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Offset disks were all the fad here in the early 80’s until after about 3 years yields started dropping because of the compaction created. You usually have wet falls the same as us across the border. Wet ground and offset disks are a bad combination. They are heavy and have alot of weight on each blade and create compaction very easy. We ran a 14’ Miller behind a 200 hp articulated 4wd and it was all it wanted. 
Most offset disks are now parked in the weeds. A disk/chisel with twisted points will do a much better job for you. 

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8 hours ago, J-Mech said:

We're you running straight, or twisted shovels?  I'm betting you did not have twisted shovel. Twisted buries fodder very well.  

Nope, dad tried twisted shovels today on chopped corn stalks - crap job.  Didnt cover anywhere near enough stalks for our liking.

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7 hours ago, Mr. Plow said:

 

Twisted shovels running on double disked 215 bu/acre stalks........as an example of how black it leaves the field.

Thats black enough, but 3 trips over field in fall, ? don't have time for that or the fuel budget for that unfortunately 

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5 hours ago, IH Forever said:

I was wondering the same thing.  We used to run a Glencoe SoilSaver with twisted shovels.  It would would get things pretty black.  We never chopped stalks, usually didn't plug unless you you had a lot of foxtail.  With today's higher populations and hybrids to doesn't have enough capacity.  Just my opinion, take it for what it's worth (nothing).  But I think chopping stalks is a time and fuel waster.  There are tools out there that will do what you want and don't require that extra trip across the field.

Just need to find that tool to fit our tractors hp.

Like chopping the stalks, they are gone by the following fall if not by spring

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Until your all done doing this chopping and disking multiple times and then chiseling, I could have rolled in there right behind the combine with a 100 hp tractor a 588 White plow and been done and it would be black?????  This conversation sounds alot like the processing tomato growers around me, they don't think nothing of running a billion passes with the disk or a turbo-till, then coming in again with a chisel trying to get the ground black(Blacker the better with runner openers on the transplanters)...............then they end up disking it once or twice after the chisel as they still had stalks on top.  And everyone called me stupid when I rolled in with a 5, 6, and a 7 bottom plow and just rolled, no prep, and it was black when the rear of the last plow pulled out of the dead furrow...........if your after black.......who saved time here????

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we have to run a disk or a disk ripper on our stalks to get them worked in.  We have a model 55 high clearance chisel with twisted slspokes and it just plugs up in the trash.  This is after we chop them with a stalk chopper.

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55 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

Until your all done doing this chopping and disking multiple times and then chiseling, I could have rolled in there right behind the combine with a 100 hp tractor a 588 White plow and been done and it would be black?????  This conversation sounds alot like the processing tomato growers around me, they don't think nothing of running a billion passes with the disk or a turbo-till, then coming in again with a chisel trying to get the ground black(Blacker the better with runner openers on the transplanters)...............then they end up disking it once or twice after the chisel as they still had stalks on top.  And everyone called me stupid when I rolled in with a 5, 6, and a 7 bottom plow and just rolled, no prep, and it was black when the rear of the last plow pulled out of the dead furrow...........if your after black.......who saved time here????

I agree the plow works great, we have two of them.  We are trying to not to have to use them all the time, every year.  Not to mention if we can go over it once with a offset disc or a disc chisel or whatever - that will be quicker in theory than a plow.  I agree about having to go over it multiple times with a disc or something to make it black - that's not what we are going for.  Quicker the better, one pass....  but like I mentioned before, we do like the stalks being chopped.  When you have a lot of stalks to get rid of, that certainly helps by chopping them.

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1 hour ago, Mountain Heritage said:

Thats black enough, but 3 trips over field in fall, ? don't have time for that or the fuel budget for that unfortunately 

If you are already chopping stalks,  then get a disk chisel, conser till chisel,  coulter chisel with twisted shanks and giv'er......same number of passes as you are doing now.

We farm small with old equipment,  cheaper to hit them with the disk (sometimes 2x because it's old and tired) and then chisel.......rather than buy better equipment. 

Have switched to tilling bean ground with straight point chisel and then no tilling beans into standing corn stalks most years.....even fewer trips.  When we need to work stalks, we accept the extra trips.  Isnt very often we need to.

Anyway, a good soil saver over chopped stalks should yield same results.

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2 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

Until your all done doing this chopping and disking multiple times and then chiseling, I could have rolled in there right behind the combine with a 100 hp tractor a 588 White plow and been done and it would be black?????  This conversation sounds alot like the processing tomato growers around me, they don't think nothing of running a billion passes with the disk or a turbo-till, then coming in again with a chisel trying to get the ground black(Blacker the better with runner openers on the transplanters)...............then they end up disking it once or twice after the chisel as they still had stalks on top.  And everyone called me stupid when I rolled in with a 5, 6, and a 7 bottom plow and just rolled, no prep, and it was black when the rear of the last plow pulled out of the dead furrow...........if your after black.......who saved time here????

It would be all black but rougher than the cobs you just buried, requiring multiple passes with a disc, field cultivator, and/or soil finisher. Even the most beautiful and perfect plowing job is not smooth enough to plant into.

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