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Delivering new IH tractors on rollbacks in the 1970's


Matt Kirsch
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I just flipped my Lee Klancher IH calendar to November, and the inset picture is of a brand new 1468 with deluxe cab and duals being winched off of a rollback into the yard of a happy young farm couple.

Didn't they take out a lot of wires delivering tractors that way? They had to be pushing 14' tall with that rig, and there were a lot of low hanging wires out there.

The local dealers where I grew up had rollbacks at the time, because most tractors were still open station and relatively light compared to what we have now. I have to figure that rollbacks were pretty common at dealers everywhere.

 

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We hauled 2+2's on cargostar with the rollback. It had a hydraulic lift heater axle,5 speed with 2 speed rear and a 392 v8. It was a slooow trip! Wires weren't much of a problem,but trees and the old steel truss bridges caused some headaches. 

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Must be a your area thing. Around here it was a non issue for 1 reason. The oilfield. Dad and Grandpa used to remark that was how the county trimmed trees around here. Anything to low hanging got ripped off when they moved drilling rigs and finishing rigs around. As far as I know power lines were never a issue because of this and the wells were drilled in the late 50s early 60s before equipment got big.

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around here rollbacks were few and far between way more dealers had Schwartz tilt beds or the Fold Downs where just the back half went down and 

 were generally had about a six inch lower bed height than the tilt beds or the roll backs .

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I hauled many 1086, 1486, ect and 2+2's on an IH Loadstar that had a DV550 under the hood and 5 speed trans with a 2spd rear end.  A schwartz tilt/roll bed and a tag axle were fitted to the rest of the truck.  Hauling high and wide on the steep roads in SW WI. was a real 'treat' with this combo.  Truss bridges on township roads were another source of great joy..LOL   I called the truck the dragonfly...as you would drag yourself up hill and fly downhill.  Luckily I never was tagged by the cops, even hauling a dualled up 2+2 on a Saturday (not exactly legal to do here). I think they felt sorry for the poor soul who had to do that....LOL

We upgraded to a new (to us..but still used....ex lumber truck) IH S series truck with twin screw, airbrake, DT466 with a 13 spd Roadranger and THAT truck was AWESOME!!! 

 

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Early 1970's ...

CO Loadstar 1800, 345, 5 SPD on column w/ 2 spd rear  & Schwartz rollback at dealership. 

Had to pickup a 7/806 w/ cab for service at a not home Farmstead...loaded tractor   proceeded out driveway & pulled electric meter Off side of the house. Before I stopped. 

Lady in house came outside...

.

 

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Our local ih dealer also sold ih construction equipment and trucks (now just sells trucks). They used various semi trucks with lowboy trailers. I remember our 706 coming out on a small lowboy pulled by a loadstar in the mid 70s. Thx-Ace 

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The local Case IH dealer here has a single axle and a tandem. Massey dealer has a tandem and John Deere dealer has a single axle. There was only one occasion when I was still working for the Case IH dealer when the truck driver caught a low hanging wire. Its higher now and it was only 220 volt anyway.

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We tried to wave him off, but the guy from the dealership tore the muffler off my brother's new to him 1066 on a tree in the driveway about 1980.  Can't remember if it just bent the muffler or broke the elbow.  The former Massey dealer that is short line and parts now still has the tilt truck with the winch and skid they used to haul combine heads.  A friend of mine worked for an International dealer in the late 60s/early 70s.  One customer had an 806 that had a 1206 head and turbo on it.  It was turned way up and weighted down and they had to go get it for new ring and pinion every two years.  He said the guy had so many weights on it they had to drop some off to winch it on the truck.  But he never had any engine problems.

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I remember our local dealer delivering tractors on a six wheel flatbed. No rollback had to back up against a bank. The dealer had a loading dock at the dealership. This was in the sixties. They may have gotten a rollback towards the end I don’t remember. They were gone before the merger. Last tractor we bought there was a 1066 which is still here by the way. 
their shop was only about 8 miles away so most of the time it we would drive tractors home after getting worked on. 

56E97B8A-AA4F-4692-9873-F3D19C138AFC.jpeg

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When I was working at White / Oliver dealer we had a GMC single axle roll back. The pickup / delivery guy hauled many ole White 2-135 tractors in on that truck, always wondered how many phone lines an etc....he wiped out unknown to him. 

Local jockey has a roll back with drop pockets for rear wheels.  

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I have hauled 06-86 series tractors on the back of my 1600 loadstar dump bed with the side boards off.. Back into a ditch or against a berm, dump all bed untill it touches the ground and drive it on or off. The only problem is long axles! Thx-Ace 

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One night I'm driving home from work at FARMALL, was in 1977, I'm on 16th Street in Moline, the street that winds around UNDER I-74 through downtown Moline, it's 5 - 5:30 PM, I meet this semi on the other side of the street, it has a single 86-series tractor in his flatbed, the cab didn't look quite right, I finally see why when I look at the tractor in my mirror, the roof of the cab was ripped off and hanging down covering the rear window of the cab. I suspect it was going back to FARMALL for a complete new cab.  Hard telling what all could have been damaged on that tractor.

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I worked at our local IH dealer during the summer of ‘76. I was tapped to deliver 3 new tractors that summer on a single axle, winch / rollback. The truck was an IH, I forget what model. Some sort of Loadstar. 

I got to deliver a 666 Hydro Diesel, a 1066, and a 1466. All were open station tractors. I was instructed to take the mufflers off to transport the tractors. 

As a young guy, I really felt  nervous having those tractors “way up there” high on that bed. I took things slow and easy, especially during turns and curves, lol. Didn’t want to tip over. We didn’t haul any duals installed on the tractors, and no room for them on the truck bed, so we would deliver them separately. 

Funny but I don’t think I’d have the nerve today in my old age to haul tractors up high on a truck like that now days. 

 

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In the early 90's I drove new combines (roaded them) from the factory at East Moline to the dealer I worked for just north of Bloomington, IL.  One day we had a convoy of 12 of them.  L...o...n..g ride with no radio (dealer installed option) and the toe not set on the steer axle.

Dealers semi wouldnt pass inspection (long story) and they sold 50 combines that summer......so 3 time we roaded them home.  Not legal for dealer to do.....but I was just college kid summer help.....so down the road we went.....all the set up guys, salesman,  etc.

Last trip I was in a 1660 with 28L rubber. 3 of us fell way behind the others and ended up getting pulled over by the IL State Police officer who sidelined the dealers semi.  Got a ticket going 12 mph in a combine for "overwidth in an implement of husbandry".  Ticket was a trip, Make: CASEIH, Model: 1660, Color: RED......got thrown out of court when dealer got the semi deal straightened out.......crazy deal all around.....

Getting out of E. Moline was .....interesting. 

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Back in the 80s Ertl introduced a 1/25th scale S Series logging truck for the JD industrial division, orange/yellow/brown JD industrial decals, and "INTERNATIONAL"  plain as day on the grill!

Next run of those trucks were still the S Series cabs, but no grill badge.......mother  Deere fixed that mistake real quick.

john-deere-logger-semi-truck-log_1_bce84a0d5b8134c5c24644c7eb9b9d35.jpg

john-deere-logging-truck-25-original_1_c9fb75f37cb61effe1e5f3bbd82da823.jpg

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  Mr. PLOW - Mother Deere had an unwritten rule that the trucking companies they used could use any brand of truck EXCEPT IH.  Really put carriers around the Quad-Cities with both IH and Deere plants in a bind.  Lots of GMC's, Whites, and now Mack's.

    On your other post,  getting out of East Moline with an over-width combine,  not sure what would be the best way.  I remember one of the QC tv stations had a news story a custom harvester picked up 5-6 new green combines,  ran right past the IH E.Moline plant, down River Drive jumped on I-74,  really tied up traffic on the bridge,  and off into Iowa.

   East Moline to BLOOMINGTON is a drive,  think I'd go same way as the custom harvester,  River Drive to I-74 south across I-280 to Rt 6, then east a mile to Rt. 150 south.  THAT would be a l-o-n-g day.

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