Jump to content

Rusted lower 3pt arm extensions-will electrolysis work to help free them up?


Recommended Posts

The lower 3pt extensions are rusted into the arm pretty tightly. I have tried heat and pulling on them with it chained to a steel pipe concreted in the ground and they will not budge. Will electrolysis clean the rust up internally in the sliding parts enough to help them come apart? 

Thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, nomorejohndeere said:

it will if you do it long enough

so will more heat and pulling harder............

Yes, but the electrolysis method is a lot less time consuming and not near as dangerous as tugging like heck on it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

lay them flat on a big piece of steel on concrete and beat on the sides of the outer tube with a sledge to break the rust "weld". Then try beating them in farther. Beat the extensions up and down. Blow rust out with compressed air, soak them in a pail of diesel fuel. Rinse and repeat as necessary. :)

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

What’s this on?  Usually those lower arm extensions are pretty sloppy in the arm, seems like in most cases dirt is the main reason they don’t want to move.  I would imagine you have a real manly air hammer, I would try pulling on the arm and hammering at the same time.  I like to put a steel slug on the end of a punch tip attachment for such stuff.  Doesn’t bugger everything up.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Take them off and soak them in a barrel of hydraulic oil then use a hydraulic jack to push them out I've used that method 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I had the same issue, tried a chain to a big dead elm tree trunk all i did was dig ruts in the edge of field,

 removed one side and hung from the other side still on tractor with 3/4 bolt and nut, remove latch assy on adjuster.    Heat till glowing red with rosebud torch.  Pound lift arm down with all your might,  have friend take over when your are tired of swinging the maul. repeat.   Consider wearing safety gear 😉.  took about 20 min a side.

Once they are out and rust and dirt come out of the socket they will slide out effortlessly.  Amazing how strong the rust and dirt bond is.  

 

imagejpeg_0.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1256 project had this issue a few months ago.  Soaked for a few weeks while on tractor.  Heated while other person used winch.  A 3rd person to hit sides & underneath to break rust bond loose.  Amazing the rust dust you will see when hitting it.  Took more time compared to the 1066 but they will come.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure what tractor they're on, but if they are on a 706-1586 or comparable tractor, take them off and throw them in a tank of water. It's just years of dirt holding them together.

 

Travis

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve tried a log chain around a tree, no luck. I put a large breaker bar through both lowers and used a hydraulic jack right next to one side. Should’ve seen bar bend and bend. Used a sledge hammer on the bar with plenty of panther fiss. No luck. 
 

Sunday I mounted the plow and went out to a field full of hardpan and unfriendly top something.  Traveled about 2 to 3 mph keeping a close eye out for any movement of the links. Nothing. 

C7205C13-0A63-4912-BF08-E8978C53B77A.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TeachersPet1066 said:

1256 project had this issue a few months ago.  Soaked for a few weeks while on tractor.  Heated while other person used winch.  A 3rd person to hit sides & underneath to break rust bond loose.  Amazing the rust dust you will see when hitting it.  Took more time compared to the 1066 but they will come.

AGREED!  

I soaked mine with penetrating oil for a couple weeks before as well don't know if it really helped.   Agreed on the amount of rust dust and pieces flying when I was hitting mine, I also hit mine on the sides and top and bottom to break the rust bond.  when the end finally came out I poured a pile of rust out of the socket.  

On the 5120  the lock lugs were rusted in as well, had to hammer and chisel them out as well.

We used one person to hold additional piece of metal on the lift link edge and pounded on it to save peening over of the lift arm edge.

KEEP it glowing red hot and keep hitting it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

These are are off of a 1456. I have been spraying these with penetrating oil off and on for a year. Besides heating one of them and pulling on it pretty hard I have tried my hi dollar Snap On air hammer rattling it every which way, and a sledge hammer to try to move it in and out a little. Other then being stuck, these arms are in pretty nice shape, so I am not real wild about beating the heck out of them.

Right or wrong, last night I rigged up a 30 gallon plastic barrel to try the electrolysis thing. This morning I will move it outside and get it started and will see what happens. If this works, I can see using this for other rusted parts that we fight from time to time on customers equipment, like rusted top 3pt links, rusted vertical 3pt adjustment links and lots of other rusty stuff.

Thanks for the suggestions, I will let you know how this turns out.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if this means anything or not, but I sure have a lot of rusty looking crap floating on the top of the water after only running a short hour or so. This is my first time with this so I don't have any idea how long this should take. I wonder what the downside to leaving it in longer then necessary? I have read somethings about hydrogen embrittlement from this process, so that may be a downside of leaving it work longer then necessary.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, pirlbeck said:

I don't know if this means anything or not, but I sure have a lot of rusty looking crap floating on the top of the water after only running a short hour or so. This is my first time with this so I don't have any idea how long this should take. I wonder what the downside to leaving it in longer then necessary? I have read somethings about hydrogen embrittlement from this process, so that may be a downside of leaving it work longer then necessary.

Be sure to take a picture, kinda curious to how well it cleaned them up

Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a 4BT Cummins in wood chipper that muffler rotted away and head was rusted horrible inside intake manifold as well as exhaust ports. Studied and done the electrolysis to clean it up. I was impressed, almost looked like a new casting. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a couple of pictures from this morning. The top was pretty much clear water when I started, so hopefully the rusty looking stuff is coming from the right spots. Sure will beat fighting these sort of things with heat and large hammers if it works.

5EF410E7-B568-4CB9-97F2-C37D745DDE1A.jpeg

16B153DC-5A49-45C9-A675-206D64938567.jpeg

EFF99326-6DF3-4DAA-AF33-55DCE1EEFCEE.jpeg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing the  photos, Interesting concept,  Will be interested in the idea of electrolysis to removed rusted frozen tight items.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

5000 PSI hot water power washer and a needle stream tip has worked for me numerous times.

Aim the stream straight into the joint where the extension slides in and drill the dirt and rust out.

If you start in one of the corners and drill through to the point that the water starts running out of the dust holes you are on your way. Just use the water stream like a reciprocating saw blade.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, boots said:

Nothing like a torch and a pair of shorts

It was a spur of the moment project,  Friend stopped by and we were looking and talking about the lower arms being stuck, next thing you know....sledge hammers farm jack, bottle jack, chains pry bars and torch is out and the lift arms are loose.  My wife snapped the picture,  I did not even realize I was in shorts until I posted the pic 🙂

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...