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Trying to make another round on soybeans today since it will be in the 70s.  Is there 1 or 2 heater valves that need shut off in order to prevent heat?  I never messed with this last year since never got going until November. Doubt A/C works but at least if I turn on air it wouldn’t be hot air.

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There are two valves but don't turn both off! A sunny day will heat the coolant that is trapped in the heater and blow it apart.

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Really? I’ve be n turning off both valves on our cabbed 1066’s forever, but, they have long rubber hoses that must be able to absorb the expansion. Do the combines have all hard lines? I’ve noticed newer machines only have the one valve, which always seemed odd to me 

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I've turned off both also for years never had any issues always thought its good insurance in case of a major leak and loosing coolant in hot weather very seldom need heat down here anyway

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2 hours ago, TeachersPet1066 said:

Ok - just one up by cylinder head?

if its like a tractor one on the back on the intake side and one on the thermostat housing, down here we cut both never had any problems, a old heating system sometimes is sticky and likes to put off heat regardless if the heat is turned off at the switch in the cab causing the a/c to seem not to work the hotter it gets

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Every 1400 series combine that I have seen has a water shut off in the cab located on the left side near the door latch. All you can see is the knob. Item 8 in the attached drawing

03ADBCFD-88D0-45FA-9FA3-D4D8A2117BF1.png

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8 minutes ago, striker782 said:

Every 1400 series combine that I have seen has a water shut off in the cab located on the left side near the door latch. All you can see is the knob. Item 8 in the attached drawing

03ADBCFD-88D0-45FA-9FA3-D4D8A2117BF1.png

That's how you control the heating temp in the cab it doesn't stop coolant from reaching the cab

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2 hours ago, striker782 said:

Every 1400 series combine that I have seen has a water shut off in the cab located on the left side near the door latch. All you can see is the knob. Item 8 in the attached drawing

03ADBCFD-88D0-45FA-9FA3-D4D8A2117BF1.png

Like KS said, if you only use that valve it still gets too hot in the cab.  It will let enough heat through the AC has a hard time working against it.  You have to shut the engine valves. 

On that related note, when you do want heat, you only need to just crack that valve open.  Doesn't take much! 

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5 hours ago, J-Mech said:

You have to shut the engine valves. 

It was much better today! (as far as cab not being hot).

Unfortunately plugged the combine & then had a lift cylinder leak & straw spreader cross bar break and only got a cart full.  Was hoping to finish beans today but will have to wait another week.

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4 minutes ago, TeachersPet1066 said:

It was much better today! (as far as cab not being hot).

Unfortunately plugged the combine & then had a lift cylinder leak and only got a cart full.  Was hoping to finish beans today but will have to wait another week.

Just turn that faucet handle off in cab. Never turned the Engine valves off on a 1460 ever. 

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49 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Just turn that faucet handle off in cab. Never turned the Engine valves off on a 1460 ever. 

That only stops one hose still heat there in summer. 

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

Just turn that faucet handle off in cab. Never turned the Engine valves off on a 1460 ever. 

Same here. Have never shut the other valves and the AC will freeze you out in the summer

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Turn the faucet off. Simple as that when you need heat turn it on. I would guess 50 percent of machinery do not have engine valves for heaters. John Deere doesn’t. Want heat turn knob want ac turn knob. Almost every automobile of that era turned a valve for one hose. Been a long time since I read a operators manual for one am positive it says shut faucet handle in warm weather. The 915 had same valve turn it off fo ac turn it on for heat. 

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Water shutoff valves....that's an interesting topic. Through the years, we've had two valves on the engine...one valve on the engine...no valves on the engine...then we've put them back on the engine. Depends on the product.

The best example on this was the classic Magnums. The original 7100 series Magnums had two water valves on the engine...one right underneath the alternator on the RH side of the engine, and one over on the LH side of the cylinder head between the injection pump and fuel filter. Sometime during 7100 series production the one under the alternator was removed...it was replaced with just an open fitting. I always figured this was a "bean counter move", as you really only need one to stop coolant circulation. Then, with late 7200 series Magnums with electric PTOs, we took the second one on the engine away. We were told that it wasn't necessary...the cab's heater valve was all that was necessary. Unfortunately, that idea got off to a bad start. The first spring they did this we were installing heater valves back on the engines as the AC systems weren't keeping up as the weather got warmer. After CaseIH got some pushback about this, they looked into the problem...and found that the guys in Racine that were installing the heater valves in the cab were not installing them properly. With the knob in the cab all the way in "off" position, the heater valve was still open a little bit, causing the poor AC performance. Once that problem was all figured out, we got along fine with no heater valves on 8900 series Magnums. 

After 2000 or so, most CNH products went with Auto Temp Control, so they used an electronic water valve...with no valves on the engines. Too bad they had to use one with rather poor quality control at the manufacturer...we used to put mechanical valves back on the engines for better AC performance again. The Magnums from the MXs on have had them on/off through the years as far as factory installation is concerned...Steigers haven't had any installed since the STXs came out in 2000 to my knowledge. Combines have pretty much have had one valve on the engine since the Flagships came along.

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I close the engine valves to head-off  unexpected trouble when cutting wheat here in kansas on 100 + degree days last thing your thinking about is needing more heat those hoses are long and rubbing against things and old can mean the difference between a breakdown or worse engine failure just my thinking on the subject concerning them engine water valves

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20 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

I close the engine valves to head-off  unexpected trouble when cutting wheat here in kansas on 100 + degree days last thing your thinking about is needing more heat those hoses are long and rubbing against things and old can mean the difference between a breakdown or worse engine failure just my thinking on the subject concerning them engine water valves

That's my reason as well

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