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Okay I'll bite. What's the difference between a picker and a stripper?

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7 minutes ago, KWRB said:

Okay I'll bite. What's the difference between a picker and a stripper?

Stripper, as the name implies strips all the cotton in first pass. Usually lower quality  cotton destined  for canvas tarps and the like is my understanding.  Picker only picks the cotton bols that have opened up. Can go back thru as more open up. At least that is an iowa boy in a cotton picker factory's understanding.

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if you look at the two the heads are completely different. Also maybe the stripper doesn't have a water tank?  How bout it southern boys did I come close to explaining it right?

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Close enough.

 I think the original intent of the picker was to go over the crop two plus times as the cotton opens from bottom to top and only picks open bolls whereas a stripper “strips” off all the bolls at once, burrs and all and are equipped with an onboard cleaner to remove the burrs and drops them back on the ground.Now, at least here, cultural practices, varieties and chemicals changed things over the years. 
 It’s only picked over once here due to the expense. When 60%+ of the bolls are open it can be sprayed with a defoliant and a boll opener so all the bolls will be open prior to harvest. Picker cotton has less trash in the lint than does stripped cotton. 
 Strippers are used in more arid areas that have shorter more compact plants with less yield and pickers are used in areas with more rainfall that have more rank growth(big, tall stalk with lots of limbs).

Strippers have been tried around here a few different times but generally speaking they don’t work for our conditions. We have too many weeds, too much rank growth and too much moisture. 
 You can’t pix it enough to maintain the compact plants required for strippers in this area.

It’s too bad we can’t because stripper heads are more economical to purchase and maintain than picker heads.

The water tank on a picker is for moistening and cleaning the spindles to keep them from getting sticky so the doffers can unwind the lint off the spindles then it’s moved by air to the accumulator or basket.

 

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l belong to several cotton ginning groups on FB. Rumors are that JD is coming out with even bigger strippers and pickers by 2022, called CS770 and CP770. Lot of the ginners and gin owners aren't happy about because the round modules will be considerably bigger than now. And most gins have just in the past few years got set up to handle round modules. Everything was designed and built to handle the ones now but if the modules get any bigger, everything will have to be replaced and/or rebuilt to handle the bigger modules.

There is also rumors that CIH is developing a round module picker. But nothing about a cotton stripper. Hopefully they are because the way it stands right now JD has the cotton harvesting machinery market locked up with little or no competition at all.

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Last I knew a complete picker was 750 to a mil depending on options. Not sure but stripper probably isn't that much cheaper?

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22 minutes ago, New Englander said:

Price tag?

Not sure about a new one but yesterday l saw a couple of 2018 stripper models with fairly low engine and fan hours for around $509,000.00 Some of the cost depends on number of rows and row width. Some older model basket strippers with average engine and separator hours are selling for around $110,000.00 to $120,000.00

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And manufactured here in Iowa.    

Regarding growing cotton..... what is the row width? Does row width and plant population vary like corn and soybeans? Is cotton irrigated? What type of fertilizer is used? What type of tillage? Can it be no-tilled?    Inquiring minds......

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20 hours ago, dads706 said:

And manufactured here in Iowa.    

Regarding growing cotton..... what is the row width? Does row width and plant population vary like corn and soybeans? Is cotton irrigated? What type of fertilizer is used? What type of tillage? Can it be no-tilled?    Inquiring minds......

Here in South Georgia much but not all of it is irrigated with center pivots.

36-38 inch rows mostly however, it can still be found in 40 inch rows. Wide rows are used to help reduce boll rot which we are lucky enough to have plenty of it because of the heat and humidity.

Dry fertilizer spread just before planting, 70-130 N, 50-80 P,80-120 K.

 Very little N needed at planting, most is top dressed about boot tall. 
 No-till is a no go here in the Coastal Plains, a lot of it is rip-strip-tilled, the rest is mostly disked then  ripped and bedded. We have to rip under the row every year.

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Saw them on I-90 headed west by the truck loads, always wondered what they were.

APF

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On 10/22/2020 at 8:46 AM, dads706 said:

And manufactured here in Iowa.    

Regarding growing cotton..... what is the row width? Does row width and plant population vary like corn and soybeans? Is cotton irrigated? What type of fertilizer is used? What type of tillage? Can it be no-tilled?    Inquiring minds......

ln my area (west Texas) most rows are 38" but a few are still using 40". There are a few cotton growers in the Texas panhandle experimenting with 80" row widths to conserve irrigation water and save on seed costs. And yes, plant population varies by variety just like other crops.

  Also in my area, there are both irrigated and dry land cotton. As far as no-till, it's not real popular around here. A few do it but not many. After the cotton is harvested, they run  a shredder or a stalk cutter over it, then either disc or use field cultivator. And there are still quite a few that "deep plow" using a switch back plow.

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Mercy 

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Why so many mirrors in a row on left side?

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So, does the machine above drop out cotton "round bales"? Kind of like a big round bale of hay?

maybe addressed before and think I have seen pictures but can't remember where. 

Totally foreign to me but interesting nonetheless. 

 

 

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58 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

So, does the machine above drop out cotton "round bales"? Kind of like a big round bale of hay?

maybe addressed before and think I have seen pictures but can't remember where. 

Totally foreign to me but interesting nonetheless. 

 

 

Yes

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So does Deere build all their cotton strippers & pickers at their Harvester Works in Moline? I guess that would be no different than when CaseIH built all their cotton pickers at the combine plant in East Moline before it closed. Just seems odd that all the cotton harvesting equipment is built up north. CaseIH was still building cotton pickers at the sprayer plant in Benson, Minnesota a few years ago; not sure if they are still being built there as most everybody seems to say CaseIH pretty much handed the cotton harvesting market to Deere years ago. I guess its no different than all of CaseIH's corn planters being built up in Saskatoon at the old Flexi-Coil plant the last several years.

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Built in ankeny iowa as are the sprayers and grain drills. AlSo some tillage stuff.

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13 hours ago, Mountain Heritage said:

Why so many mirrors in a row on left side?

Well duh....so you can see where you been.....😄

But seriously, it is so you can see if all the row units are working correctly, especially the rows that go under the machine. Sometimes they can get choked up by a tumbleweed or a cockleburr or a mechanical failure and you won't know it until you see it behind you in the mirrors. Plus they usually have a mirror aimed to look at the side of the machine on both sides to check for smoke and/or flames in case it catches fire.

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How many pickers or strippers can be sold?  Cotton has not been a booming crop. California was well over a million acres down to under 200,000 acres this year. Other states may not have the options in other crops as here, but still cannot see to many being sold a year.

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