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Been casually following this and just realized you could have sucked something solid into the chamber .Should be able to look into the area through the spark plug hole and see the top of the pistons when up partially.

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Look at the rod that the water came out of #2 If it would have had Lucas electrics it would have stopped when the front tire got damp, unlucky in that aspect but beats a lifetime of other grief

I’d remove the spark plug and attach a wet dry vacuum to each cylinder . Attached to air cleaner. Attached t to exhaust .  put some marvel mysteries oil in cylinders . Hand crank After your sure all

...interesting.....lucky operator.....that could have been far worse than a stuck engine.... .......the RPM's the engine is turning at , at the moment of immersion is  critical !!!....for example

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well.... Duntongw, thx for the help, and i'll stay in touch. Tomorrow i'll remove the "Lift-All" hydraulics unit (which i should anyway..) and maybe I can peek thru there !? Hey VacDaddyt; that's a possibility and i'll check that route in the morning light.  I dunno about removing the head, and will read further about that route...   The night may bring further wisdom. . . 

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19 hours ago, Piero said:

well.... Duntongw, thx for the help, and i'll stay in touch. Tomorrow i'll remove the "Lift-All" hydraulics unit (which i should anyway..) and maybe I can peek thru there !? Hey VacDaddyt; that's a possibility and i'll check that route in the morning light.  I dunno about removing the head, and will read further about that route...   The night may bring further wisdom. . . 

Nothing to see but the flywheel and clutch area by taking out the liftall pump.  Will give you no advantage on the engine.

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Pull the rod caps and look at the bearings.  Try turning the crank with the rods disconnected.  Try pushing the pistons up from beneath with a piece of wood and a jack.  It sounds almost like a spun bearing.

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I bought an Oliver 88 once that ingested it's own intake valve. It smashed the piston and sleeve to oblivion since it was running when it happened. The block was fine, I got a new sleeve, and another piston, new rod bearings. looked the rod over, it looked straight, decided to try to reuse it, I didn't have much into it and didn't really care. It ran real good for about a year, but without a lot of hours. Then one day it started lightly knocking when it was first started, then went away when it had full oil pressure.  I decided to recheck that rod. Pulled the pan, dropped that rod, and it was immediately evident that rod was truly bent although it didn't appear to be visually. The reason I could tell was that the outer edges of side of the bearing end of the rod was shiny like chrome, one side on the top, the other side on the bottom, from rubbing on the crank throws as it ran. Then, once I pulled the cap, the bearing looked like new on one side at the center of the bearing, and was wore down through the copper on the other side of the center of the bearing. I then took the rod and set it on a piece of glass with the bearing end flat against the glass, then I mic-ed the clearance between the glass and the wrist pin end on the very top of the rod, and then at the bottom of the wrist pin boss. It wasn't much, but it was for sure bent, and now being placed on that piece of glass, it became visible to the naked eye that it indeed was bent just a little. Used rod with a new bearing and it's been running great since, which has been a few years. But even a little bit of water can for sure bend a rod, I've seen it a couple times.

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thanks guys.... i intended to work on it today, but just couldn't with all the to-dos !  Tomorrow i'll try again...  first, i'll look thru the sparkplug hole for "something foreign" in the chamber (maybe even go in with a copper wire to see if i can snag something ??), and second; i'll remove the #2 rod cap and try to turn the engine to check if its any easier.  I do have another question; about the only place i haven't opened is the gears cover on the front... is that "compartment" sealed from the crankcase ?   There might be water there too... but its kinda hard to get to !  Maybe just drill a small hole on the bottom, and seal with silicone it in the future.... would that be a OK "solution" ??

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Filling with water can do some awful damage! A neighbour tipped his WD9 into a slough at wide open throttle. One rod bent over at a 90 degree angle, and the crankshaft stopped so suddenly that the flywheel sheared all the bolts off and kept spinning. Broke the head and wrecked the block too.

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Ok... after s'more finger freezing, this is what i did and discovered.  I removed the belly pump... and at first sight all looked good in that flywheel/clutch/pump space. Then i went back to crankcase bottom, and removed the #2 crank rod cap. The engine was immediately much easier to turn, although only for a few degrees.  Then, looking for an explanation.... i noticed that the clutch-flywheel are stuck together !!  When i depress the clutch pedal, i can see the T/O bearing being pressed against the clutch "fingers"... but nothing operates; ie both parts remain firmly attached/fused together.  I tapped it lightly, then medium hard... but with no encouraging results.  Any special tips on this ??   (thks cbfarmall, not removing that front cover makes it easier on me.   kal;  the tractor entered the pond going at about 1/3 speed, in first gear)  ( am i correct in assuming that that #2 rod is bent  ?? )

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I’ve never even sat on an M, but i will type anyway:  first, sorry for the situation but the key is she wasn’t hurt.  Next, at 1/3 speed I would agree with Duntongw, I’d think it would have stalled fast and it would easily, without a struggle, and as such shouldn’t have bent a rod or hurt a bearing.  Several guys asked about the clutch pedal. Sitting on it, your left foot can’t feel it being normal or not? In general, a clutch disk barely moves away from the pressure plate, or I should say the plate barely moves from it. You may not be looking at it correctly, and will need a helper to work the pedal up and down fully, as you look up at it with a light.  A clutch problem doesn’t explain your motor not wanting to move though, unless something very rare and exotic is going on, like a clutch finger blew out and is somehow stuck between the flywheel and the bell housing ( not even sure that’s possible) but, get my point?.  I’d remove the starter, if you did already sorry I missed it.  Also with that rod cap off, if that rod as a problem, shouldn’t the motor turn half a revolution freely?  Be very careful doing that though please. 

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OK... the starter is removed, and while a helper rocks the engine by hand at the front fan pulley i'm looking at the clutch/flywheel assembly from underneath, thru the belly-pump opening. I can see the shaft going to the transmission (thus after the clutch) also rock back and forth. This being independent of the clutch pedal released or jammed tight in the "in"position with  2X4.   ( The FarmAll is stationary (tires on the ground) because of its broken front left spindle. )

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when i first did removed the belly-pump (lLiftAll pump on that tractor) yesterday... i was kinda "hoping" to find a rock, or something similarly hard rubbing/jamming everything, but i see only a small sector of the flywheel, and nothing that could "seize" it !

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I reckon that several guys asked me about the clutch. Truth is i couldn't, nor my friend helping me troubleshoot (and he's knowledgable with farmAlls..), notice anything wrong with the clutch by depressing it !!  As one pushes on the pedal i can see the TO bearing slide till it contacts the clutch, then the person depressing the pedal feels the increased pressure as i see the fingers move some ways..... but ultimately the disk remains fused to the flywheel.  Tomorrow, if the weather permits i'll try delicately inserting a thin blade (scrapper?) inbetween these two parts.  Unless someone tells me otherwise....    Also; as i was removing the #2 rod cap yesterday, i notice a few drops of antifreeze  (fluo yelowish-green color) drip.  Haven't seen that (antifreeze) nowhere else....    any ideas ??

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Thanks for the suggestion stronger800... but then is my only other alternative for freeing a stuck clutch is to split the tractor ??   And once split, can the clutch be saved anyways ??   I wonder if i can see/measure how much pad material there left from looking at it from the belly pump area... something to try tomorrow.   I'm aware i'll not get that FarmAll going before next summer... but it would ne nice to know whats "waiting" me job wise... and find/buy the materials needed before hand.  ( &... we're on a tight budget ! )

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Clutch  disc is probably stuck to flywheel due to being wet and then rusting slightly. Not uncommon  in high humidity  conditions  for clutch to stick to flywheel if a tractor hasn't been run in a while. Since yours has been dunked I'd guess thats the deal. Usually start in gear with clutch depressed and brakes firmly applied will break a lot of em loose. In your case thats not gonna happen obviously.  Least of your problems at moment. If it sucked water in and came to a sudden stop even at 1/3 throttle I wouldn't be suprised if something got bent. If it died due to wet ignition and then filled with water you probably be ok. Truth is you were not there so you don't know and your operator was probably very shook up and may not be able to give an accurate  account of events.

Exhaust all the simple causes first, which sounds like you probably have. Wouldnt be suprised if you end tearing it apart.

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thx iowaboy....what you say jives with everything on this end.    Just that i had hoped to only rebuild the engine without splitting the tractor...  but so are the dices thrown !!   I'll cover the whole shebang for the winter, and check things out again when the snow melts next spring.  So my next question (to the group/forum..); what sort of winterizing can i do to mitigate further damages.. ?   I'll have the winter to re-rebuild all removable parts... which is OK.  How may separate the clutch from the flywheel (??)... as that once done i could possibly see (by isolating it.. ) if the tranny is also damaged.  Damaging it further is of no consequences if its thin enough to warrant replacement.... or am i wrong ?  (i'd use a scrapper, or a rivet-busting chisel in very good shape, or.... (?) )

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Piero: Quit making more problems for yourself, one thing at a time. If your not going to get this resolved soon, in my opinion, you better be concerned with the engine being stabilized until spring. That mainly means not getting rust in it. Get yourself some large cans of WD40, this is a water disperser made of fish oil. There is still water in places of the engine that needs to get out of there. Start internally at the top and work down. Spray all around the rockers, valve stems, etc., if it is not painted drench it, if there is a hole, spray it in it. I assume that there is a side panel on the engine where the cam and lifters are. Take it off and drench everything in there. Spray in your spark plug holes, spray all around crank, up under pistons where the wrist pin holds the rod to the piston, and where the rods connect to the crank. After a few days, the wd 40 will basically dissolve, it is not a rust preventive coating. Now you will need to coat it probably with oil. That connecting rod that you disconnected, is now very susceptible to dirt and damage. The tiniest speck of dirt or rust can cause major problems down the road. That babbit bearing on the rod end is extremely soft, and any dirt will imbed into it. Be very careful not to nick the crank, and make sure you get a good coating of oil on that bare journal. When done, put all of the covers and pans back on, you don't need new gaskets. Wrap the engine in an old quilt, blanket, something non plastic, it will help absorb moisture before getting to the engine, then cover with plastic, tarp whatever. If I have missed something, I am sure someone else will mention it, or have a better plan. It seems your out of nice weather, and trying to rush something in the cold is not the best way to handle it.

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Be nice if you could split it and get engine inside so you could diagnose and work on it over winter. Dont think those are too rough to split. 

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I'll wrap it up tomorrow... ; oil and protect as much as i can, as Duntongw wisely suggests. (i've bought Fluid-film, spray type Cosmoline, Stabil fogging oil, and have cans of Beoshield B9 and another one that i forget the name at this time... and will report what worked best in the spring) But i'll still have another go at trying to dislodge that clutch.  I'll de driving thru Wisconsin quite a few time these coming months, and could try a different country route everytime, just to see if i can find a parts donor tractor if so needed.  But for that i need to know what else is wrong, ie: is the tranny good or not !?  It can't be split at the moment because of that damn broken front end; as the front wont roll as it is, and where its at just doesn't make it any easier, + that freaking snow wayyy ahead of its regular due time.... duh,     &  F#*% !   I guess that i'll be "practicing my patience" . .. ... ....

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Around here we typically roll the front ends forward but it seems most guys actually prefer to roll the back ends backward. Some extended wood blocking would support your front end if you wanted to slide it ahead. Or, block it good and move the rear. (It’s not a big tractor....you’re looking at how many bolts here). Like you said split it then you know where the problem is, ie, “is the tranny good or not”.

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