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Another change about to happen


Howard_P

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Vertical integration was the way all big corporations worked in the 20s, 30s, 40s.  Look at GM, Ford, and many others, all building all parts of their product.  Everyone including IH backed away from this starting in the 50s as they bought components from suppliers that specialized in particular items.  One of IH's problems was they tried to be too broad with too many products in too many fields.  But the biggest problem was the lack of a financial plan that would give adequate returns from these products over the long run.  Some should have been dropped long before the end.

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On 10/17/2020 at 7:26 AM, Howard_P said:

..I think   of the VW 'beetle'.......and .those dreadfull   vans.......'metric tractors'...we called them, down under...........I look at the pictures taken in one of my many visits to USA...of the late conventional    Class 8 International Harvester trucks.....I look  at photo's of the numerous new IH equipment , including      Australian built trucks, that I brought....

Another bloody tragedy.......sigh

...at least its not a freakin  Chinese company....guess we should be grateful  for small mercies......

Mike

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12 hours ago, mike newman said:

..I think   of the VW 'beetle'.......and .those dreadfull   vans.......'metric tractors'...we called them, down under...........I look at the pictures taken in one of my many visits to USA...of the late conventional    Class 8 International Harvester trucks.....I look  at photo's of the numerous new IH equipment , including      Australian built trucks, that I brought....

Another bloody tragedy.......sigh

...at least its not a freakin  Chinese company....guess we should be grateful  for small mercies......

Mike

Traton,who are the trucking division with VW have had a small stake (16 % approx) in Navistar for 4-5 years now ,collaborating on technology etc,so it was bound to happen sooner or later.Not all bad ,they will still be Navstars,and built in the U.S.A bit like the Mack /Volvo setup. Mack is still Mack,and Volvo still Volvo.Both still good products.

 

12 hours ago, mike newman said:

,

 

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I don't see it as the end of the world or the end of the company as we know it as some do.  There is a difference in being owned by Traton, a heavy truck company, rather than by VW directly although VW does own Traton. 

I expect there to be few changes in the near future.  The corporation itself has not changed, it is just owned by Traton and rather than Carl Ican and hedge funds. 

Over time, Traton will make changes, but it will not make sense for them to destroy their entry into the US market.  Certainly there will be cooperation, particularly in new areas such as electric trucks and self-driving software, perhaps more common components such as engines, and it has been suggested this may make future financing of major projects easier.  But it is unlikely there will be one Traton truck replacing the present lines--the markets are just too different and imports/exports have not been particularly successful in the past.

In addition to the Mack-Volvo connection maintaining separate lines, Freightliner is owned by Daimler, but maintains it's American identity.

Even if VW exerts its influence, remember the "VW 'beetle'.......and .those dreadfull   vans" were the products of over half a century ago and the fact they have survived this long says something for them, but they are not representative of VW today.  Not everything IH did at that time was the greatest either.

 

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the County I work for buys Navistar trucks on a regular basis for snow plows.  Navistar has serious issues, one truck went back to the dealer 4 times before completing its route, another was delivered and parked by the fuel pump to fill up, then was towed back to the dealer, 3 more tows after that.  two of them throw exhaust temp warnings every time you slow down,  one of the brand new ones made it through its route and went back to the dealer the next day. They eventually get most of the bugs worked out of them but It really makes a guy scratch his head and wonder how they could sell one of these trucks to someone who depended on them for their livelihood.  Hate to say it but we're kind of hoping that the German engineering influence brings some much needed quality improvements.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/20/2020 at 9:36 PM, Howard_P said:

  Not everything IH did at that time was the greatest either.

 

Like the steel they used in the Scout bodies?  There is a place they should have been making their own. Oh wait, they did make their own until 1977 (Wisconsin steel).  Do you know if that is where the Scout body steel originated?

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I don't know for sure, but I doubt if it came from WS.  I would expect there is some processing needed to produce 18 (or whatever) gauge sheet metal from the output of the mill that I doubt if WS could do-- and I doubt if IH usage was enough compared to the Detroit car makers to justify this processing.  I've heard it was purchased on the open market.  One problem is the specs for the material weren't as good as they should have been in the early years so purchasing could buy the cheapest steel available until the specs were tightened in the mid-70s.

Note that Scouts were not that much different than early 70s Ford or Chev pickups.  Try to find one one the streets that hasn't been rebuilt.  The big difference is by 1980, they had made big changes in construction and materials so their trucks lasted much longer.

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Right before IH went down they were making major expansions worldwide, then a strike by the UAW along with piss poor management lead to there selloff. 

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