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Blower for Detroit


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My Godfather who was in the Navy in WWII loved those GM diesels.  He ran a landing craft in the Pacific that had twin 6-71 Gray Marines in it.  He had one story of being hung up on the beach and not being able to back off.  He put both GM's wide open in reverse and he and his two crew members got down between the motors to shield them from the bullets.  He said they had time to smoke two cigarettes' before she started bumping and moving backwards.  When she came off there were two piles of sand on either side that had fun through the cooling system pumps.  Needless to say the engines had to be replaced after that!  He firmly believed in them as the best engines ever made to the day he died!

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double

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7 hours ago, J-Mech said:

. it's a long list and a lot of stuff can be swapped

You speak the truth , Bought a reman short block for Silver 8V92 in a L9000 ford , took me dang near 3 days to undress/dress it

Sure was a horny sounding motor though 😀     Oh geez now I gotta find last months issue of Wheels of time and hit the .....never mind

 

2091552525_detroitgirl.thumb.jpg.c54f5c20fa78876a787be7813f80f5f6.jpg

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7 hours ago, J-Mech said:

 

double

 

 

 

detroit girl.jpg

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double

 

 

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44 minutes ago, Kevingweq said:

took me dang near 3 days to undress/dress it

Lol.  Not poking fun in any way, but me and my best friend worked together at our first job as mechanic's while we finished school.  We used to sit the old and new engines side by side and swap all the parts in a day.  One time we had a 4-53 in an oil rig break a main bearing cap.  I pulled a rebuilt engine off the rack and started undressing it while he pulled the engine out of the rig.  Once everything was disconnected, we both pulled it out of the frame and sat it next to the other engine.  We swapped the bell housings, exhaust manifold and switched something else, but I can't remember what.  Might have been governor's.  Then put the new engine back in the rig.  Took us 7 hours including tools out and putting them up. Guy we worked for was an old hard ass who had been in the service in Korea or Vietnam, I don't remember which.  He got trained by the Air Force (I believe) as a diesel mechanic and then worked on nothing but Detroits.  He trained us. Even he was impressed we swapped that engine in a day, let alone in less than 8 hours. We did crap like that regularly.  We used to do clutch jobs on fuel delivery trucks with dual PTO's on them in just a few hours including resurfacing the flywheel.  It was a busy shop and we got to be very good at what we did.  Not bragging, just sharing stories. 

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29 minutes ago, J-Mech said:

We used to do clutch jobs on fuel delivery trucks with dual PTO's on

There was a notorious runway plow truck at Logan Airport , An old cantankerous FWD with a Frink rollover plow and sander on it .

Well every new driver got trained in that horse and chewed up and spit out the 14in double disc pull clutch , Kept a resurfaced flywheel on the

shelf along with a rebuilt clutch after the smoke cleared and she cooled down a bit , I would pop the floorboards and hang the tranny with a chain hoist 

about an hour or two later we would bolt the floorboards back in and send it out plowing the runways.

Worked side by side with my Dad for a lot of years. Best thing about it was being headfirst in a truck or piece of equipment and without saying a word he would hand me the exact tool that i need for whatever I was doing .

One of my best memories was firing up a fresh rebuilt 3208 that powered a runway broom . cranked it over and she fired right away , We both saw a small rag

near the intake pipe flutter and the next instant it was sucked right in , Dad reaches for the controls and instead of shutting it down cranks the throttle wide open

and holds it there !!   Smoking and popping while flaming pieces of rag shot everywhere then it smoothed right out and run like a champ . He shuts it down

and gives me a crap eating grin and says "Dam those Cats are a tough motor"

 

Here's Dad George (Jolly) Wheeler with his part's runnin 29 Model A pickup and his 26 T

(RIP)

 

T and A 26T 29A dad 001.jpg

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1 hour ago, J-Mech said:

Lol.  Not poking fun in any way, but me and my best friend worked together at our first job as mechanic's while we finished school.  We used to sit the old and new engines side by side and swap all the parts in a day.  One time we had a 4-53 in an oil rig break a main bearing cap.  I pulled a rebuilt engine off the rack and started undressing it while he pulled the engine out of the rig.  Once everything was disconnected, we both pulled it out of the frame and sat it next to the other engine.  We swapped the bell housings, exhaust manifold and switched something else, but I can't remember what.  Might have been governor's.  Then put the new engine back in the rig.  Took us 7 hours including tools out and putting them up. Guy we worked for was an old hard ass who had been in the service in Korea or Vietnam, I don't remember which.  He got trained by the Air Force (I believe) as a diesel mechanic and then worked on nothing but Detroits.  He trained us. Even he was impressed we swapped that engine in a day, let alone in less than 8 hours. We did crap like that regularly.  We used to do clutch jobs on fuel delivery trucks with dual PTO's on them in just a few hours including resurfacing the flywheel.  It was a busy shop and we got to be very good at what we did.  Not bragging, just sharing stories. 

Hey, when a guy is good at what he does it ain't bragging, I knew some motorheads like that, great guys to have around especially when you had a chase truck with tools.

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Detroit Diesel was born out of GM wanting to establish a automotive diesel division. It was first Winton motor. They unit injectors for yacht motors. Ketterling of General Motors needed his yacht motor improved so they came together and developed the first GM diesel motors. In 1938 they were used in GMs own bus company. Interesting is they looked at buying Cummins. Detroit is a fun motor to play around with. One day I will get them figured out. Posted some pics off the net.

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