Jump to content

Tying round bales by hand


Recommended Posts

So I'm baling hay this afternoon and the electric tie actuator quit.

They are calling for 2 to 4 inches over the next few days, hurricane beta.

So I unhook the actuator and do it by hand. Every bale I jump off the tractor, untie the twine, move the arm across the bale, get up on tractor, shut off the pto, get off tractor,  cut the twine, tie it to the frame, get back on the tractor to kick out the bale and go again. I was on my 4 post 1486, no cab, which actually made it easier.

It made for a dusty afternoon and my arms sore from climbing on and off the tractor.  I doubt osha would approve but I got the field done...

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

  Check the Electric 12 Volt plug on the Twine arm,  It may have gotten wet or Damp,  poor connection.   you need a healthy positive & negative connection.

With the monitor plugged into your tractor activate the Manual twine tie,  another person may need to push the Button, do you have 12 volts to the electric motor plug?

Check the full length of the wire harness, you will see many wires in that plastic woven covering, the larger RED wire runs the motor.

Over the years that wire harness may have been damaged or crushed by the former owners,  if that hot wire has copper showing and grounds it self to negative baler frame the system shuts down.

Do you have a small white reset button on the bottom of your control box?   that can give you trouble if it gets wet,  water runs down the top of the control box to the lowest point, the alarm beeper, circuit breaker and wire harness plug,  even a heavy due in the morning can effect the control box.

And the last thing to check,  that small motor on the swing arm needs lubrication inside the motor shaft bushings,  over the years the original grease gets gummy and stalls the motor,  That arm assembly needs to be removed from the baler,   placed on a bench,   this motor assembly is very similar to a car door with power windows, a small spinning worm gear that spins one direction and immediately spins back to the home position.  remove the motor,   slowly remove the 2 small bolts holding the motor together,  watch for the brushes,    lubricate the bushings,   reassemble. 

Good luck,    Jim Droscha

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that it helps you now but you can turn the pto on and off from behind the tractor by pushing or pulling horizontally on the actuator rod. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a problem like that.  Turned out there was a mud dauber nest in the control box.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The round baler we have now had that problem once when my Uncle was still bailing his own hay with it. He wrenched his back up and needed help bailing hay with it so my Dad and brother went down there to bale. Make a bale, my brother would hop off the tractor and manually work the wand back and forth on the baler to tie it.

Uncle sent the baler to us to see if we could find the problem. In our case it was a wire that went bad in the middle of the piece. Never was apart so i have no clue how it did that but ran a new wire and it solved the problem. Hasn't been a issue since and we have the baler now.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, exSW said:

I had a problem like that.  Turned out there was a mud dauber nest in the control box.

Bill Faberbakke?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MTO said:

Bill Faberbakke?

Figures. 

Man you're old.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Its something in the actuator. The motor runs but it's not moving. I'll take it apart and fix it or replace it with a hydraulic cylinder and control valve. It was just annoying.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Weren't some of the early vermeer balers manual tie?  Cousin was telling about feeding twine in by hand on them somehow. My old 510 jd is a hyd cylinder on twine arm. Has a flow control but i always bump the lever wait bump again. Gets old but reliabe if the operator is any good 🤪

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Weren't some of the early vermeer balers manual tie?  Cousin was telling about feeding twine in by hand on them somehow. My old 510 jd is a hyd cylinder on twine arm. Has a flow control but i always bump the lever wait bump again. Gets old but reliabe if the operator is any good 🤪

The early New Holland's had a option of a manual crank or electric tie ( our New Holland is as early model round baler as you can get and it is a electric tie). The later ones for a bit had hydraulic tie. Neighbor has a 853 i believe and it's hydraulic tie.

Ih 241s were pull ropes pulling the arm across 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Reichow7120 said:

The early New Holland's had a option of a manual crank or electric tie ( our New Holland is as early model round baler as you can get and it is a electric tie). The later ones for a bit had hydraulic tie. Neighbor has a 853 i believe and it's hydraulic tie.

Ih 241s were pull ropes pulling the arm across 

 

In college I ran a Balzer baler which is Vermeer made that had the rope pull twine arm. A little crude but better than getting off and on like Ace had to do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My old Holland 847 has hydraulic tie that mostly works great. Occasionally the twine won't start wrapping because it is a bit short so I have to get out and help it. Every time I do that I think about the stories I've heard of guys losing their arms or their life working on a running baler. So far, so good. But never forget. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Awful glad you are around to type this thread. 

Not sure what kind of baler you have (maybe you were completely safe in running the twine arm by hand) but my NH's, where the twine arms are located, no way in he11 would I stick my arm down there on a running baler. 

Had the hyd tie with my first NH 855 (got good practice counting 1 thousand thousand 2 thousand thousand................😄), then went auto wrap on the next three. Never looked back and less trouble than bale command or so I tell myself. 

A past pastor of mine got an arm caught in a running baler. Just tight enough he couldn't pull it out and loose enough it didn't pull him in or take arm off. tractor finally ran out of gas. Later that night wife found him, went and got help to get him out. Seeing his arm (yes he kept it, very ugly looking) is a reminder to stay away from the business end of a baler when it is running. 

I get why you did what you did. (and will repeat, maybe you were completely safe running the twine arm by hand) I have done things in a rush I looked back on, shivered a little, and sent a thankyou northwards for  sparing my dumb arse. Very glad you made it through. 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

The early New Holland's had a option of a manual crank or electric tie ( our New Holland is as early model round baler as you can get and it is a electric tie). The later ones for a bit had hydraulic tie. Neighbor has a 853 i believe and it's hydraulic tie.

Ih 241s were pull ropes pulling the arm across 

 

Don't think the early NH 850s were available with electric, but late ones yes for sure. My last 850 was electric, my 1st two were hand crank. Today I sit in a Magnum 275 & bale with a NH 7090 and think I did something on a 250 bale day when I have to get out once to put a new roll of net in.  Then I recall the day in 78 that I baled 423 bale with a hand crank 850 behind my open 856 for 11 farmers with 22 fields in 3 counties. Used 21 balls of twine, 9000 ft as there was not round baler twine yet then. No cell phones, 18 yrs old, just pulled out the drive with enough twine to last till swinging by home for more fuel and a planned route in my head, and a jug of water. Also carried a couple jugs of oil to douse the floor chains. That is my biggest hay day in 44 yrs of round baling. Never know might best myself, got a 560 Bale Slice Plus on order for next summer.  :lol: Have no interest in that long of day anymore. Don't like missing Jeopardy !

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, 1480x3 said:

Don't think the early NH 850s were available with electric, but late ones yes for sure. My last 850 was electric, my 1st two were hand crank. Today I sit in a Magnum 275 & bale with a NH 7090 and think I did something on a 250 bale day when I have to get out once to put a new roll of net in.  Then I recall the day in 78 that I baled 423 bale with a hand crank 850 behind my open 856 for 11 farmers with 22 fields in 3 counties. Used 21 balls of twine, 9000 ft as there was not round baler twine yet then. No cell phones, 18 yrs old, just pulled out the drive with enough twine to last till swinging by home for more fuel and a planned route in my head, and a jug of water. Also carried a couple jugs of oil to douse the floor chains. That is my biggest hay day in 44 yrs of round baling. Never know might best myself, got a 560 Bale Slice Plus on order for next summer.  :lol: Have no interest in that long of day anymore. Don't like missing Jeopardy !

Nice work. 

Our 850 is a electric tie but with no serial number records or breakdowns i have no clue when it was made. Dont even know about the dealer that sold it new according to the dealer stickers in it. Oh well, it was a free baler for us. It works 

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, 801486 said:

That's why I like my Vermeer J with hydraulic tie.

Hydraulic tie was theoretically good but in actuality it would get bent out of shape every year from oversize windrows or something. I could hardly imagine electric tie being worse.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/22/2020 at 8:25 AM, acem said:

Its something in the actuator. The motor runs but it's not moving. I'll take it apart and fix it or replace it with a hydraulic cylinder and control valve. It was just annoying.

Ace, that's what separates the men from boys. Honestly I'd of parked it and figured something else out. So my hats off to you sir for doing what you had to do. Us younger generation (me included) have at times gotten spoiled. my grandfather was the same way. The old saying "it is whatever it is" comes to mind. Something breaks, you work around however you must and you did just that. Be safe out there. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, lightninboy said:

Hydraulic tie was theoretically good but in actuality it would get bent out of shape every year from oversize windrows or something. I could hardly imagine electric tie being worse.

I've been running a J with hydraulic tie for more 10 years with no problems.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...