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Cultivating crop shields for corn


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I have few questions about these shields . Are they mounted on the Farmall C two on a side ?  Are they directional right and left ? 
if on a two row c244 I’ve  got to find or make the other sides ! 
Here’s what I would like to do is get them set up on the what I call the original Farmall C and show it at Springfield in 22 . I like to show if I can the equipment that was for the Farmall C . 
if you know about these shields help me and others out with comments please . I’ve never seen any pictures of this implements on the Farmall C just briefly dad cultivated with them ,65 years ago , I never saw them mounted

 

Also I’m coming to show the way the tractor is , I think it will be fine Power wash it , add with a coat of linseed oil. The reason is I don’t know if this the second or third coat of paint. One re top coat at the dealer for spring maintenance special was done for sure , I’d hate to mess that paint up . I think this is third paint job but going to leave it . You fellows can tell me when I get there .
 The cultivators we will use again ,I’m going to clean up and paint cause we need to preserve what we got . Going use in field so vibra-shanks are going to operational . I bought a set of cultivators for super c in canton one spring , my son use them to hill potato’s, the work great, I’m proud he is getting good at it. I need to take some photos ,they are so helpful. 
 

 

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2 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

Would these shields have been the same as most other fast hitch or early 3pt rear mounted cultivators?  

Not sure without looking but are very similar to front mount culivator i have for my 400.

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3 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

I have few questions about these shields . Are they mounted on the Farmall C two on a side ?  Are they directional right and left ? 

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What are the measurements of the shields?  If we can figure out that they are the same as several other cultivators, you may have better luck finding some. 

36 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Not sure without looking but are very similar to front mount culivator i have for my 400.

I have a # 463 rear mount that look very similar is why I asked.

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I have a......455 maybe? Not sure if the ends of shields are angled the same but other wise i think are real similar. Not at home but if i remember will look later...

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As others have said you have 2 shields per row, 1 left and 1 right. They are definitely not unique to the cultivators for a C. I have the same shields on a 466 cultivator. They are pretty common so think you could find more.

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Well I need to look ? more where I found these , I know dad didn’t throw them out .

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Shields ? 9 x32 looks  Also looks like 45 degrees 

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Dad used to store the cultivator against the back wall of the machine shed, the two front sections side-by-side against the back wall but with the lift cylinders to the outside and then lay planks, 2x12's on top of them and set the rear gang and the fenders on the planks. Fenders were removed when laying by corn.  Carrying those fenders was a finger pinching job of the worst kind.  Dad put rolling shields on as soon as Tractor Supply started carrying them. He was not impressed. I cultivated with them a year, maybe 2.

I think you would be surprised how many of those fenders got scrapped.  The idea was they would keep dirt off the shovels from covering the tiny plants, and as the plants got taller you raised the fenders to let more dirt get around the plants.  Root balls from last year's corn would get stuck between the fenders on a row, mash the corn or beans down quite a ways if it happened on a row you weren't watching. I normally watched the inside right row, and glanced at the outside right row a couple times in a quarter mile. Left side I'd check 2-3 times in a quarter mile.

Max Armstrong had a segment on U.S. Farm Report a bit over a month ago about a couple Midwest farmers cultivating corn again. And I guarentee you they are not using fenders!  All used 3 pt hitch cultivators, guidance systems,  auto-steer, and tractors with cab and AC.  One guy had a unique tool, he hill dropped his corn, not drilled, same thing Dad did 50-60 years ago, instead of a single seed every 4 to 5 inches, he planted 3-4 seeds in a clump every 12 to 16 inches. And he had a tool mounted above the cultivator with a motor that turned a horizontal disk with a rod running down over the row that was set to the outside of the disk, and a crescent shaped shovel on the end of the rod cultivated between the clumps of plants by revolving, spinning as the tractor moved forward. Each row had a photo eye to control speed so the sweep always missed the corn.  I didn't see any weeds in the fields but it looked like these cultivators were capable of getting every weed in a field.  I can't imagine cultivating coming back into rowcrop farming. Too many $100,000+ sprayers around.

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38 minutes ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Dad used to store the cultivator against the back wall of the machine shed, the two front sections side-by-side against the back wall but with the lift cylinders to the outside and then lay planks, 2x12's on top of them and set the rear gang and the fenders on the planks. Fenders were removed when laying by corn.  Carrying those fenders was a finger pinching job of the worst kind.  Dad put rolling shields on as soon as Tractor Supply started carrying them. He was not impressed. I cultivated with them a year, maybe 2.

I think you would be surprised how many of those fenders got scrapped.  The idea was they would keep dirt off the shovels from covering the tiny plants, and as the plants got taller you raised the fenders to let more dirt get around the plants.  Root balls from last year's corn would get stuck between the fenders on a row, mash the corn or beans down quite a ways if it happened on a row you weren't watching. I normally watched the inside right row, and glanced at the outside right row a couple times in a quarter mile. Left side I'd check 2-3 times in a quarter mile.

Max Armstrong had a segment on U.S. Farm Report a bit over a month ago about a couple Midwest farmers cultivating corn again. And I guarentee you they are not using fenders!  All used 3 pt hitch cultivators, guidance systems,  auto-steer, and tractors with cab and AC.  One guy had a unique tool, he hill dropped his corn, not drilled, same thing Dad did 50-60 years ago, instead of a single seed every 4 to 5 inches, he planted 3-4 seeds in a clump every 12 to 16 inches. And he had a tool mounted above the cultivator with a motor that turned a horizontal disk with a rod running down over the row that was set to the outside of the disk, and a crescent shaped shovel on the end of the rod cultivated between the clumps of plants by revolving, spinning as the tractor moved forward. Each row had a photo eye to control speed so the sweep always missed the corn.  I didn't see any weeds in the fields but it looked like these cultivators were capable of getting every weed in a field.  I can't imagine cultivating coming back into rowcrop farming. Too many $100,000+ sprayers around.

When I cultivated corn as a kid these type of shields were gone and replaced by rolling shields.  The 463 4 row fast hitch cultivator I started with had been fitted with Noble rolling shields.  I then moved up to a Noble 8 row cultivator and it also had rolling shields.  As I said I never actually cultivated with this style shield but my understanding was that the rolling shields prevented some of the plugging from root balls and other trash you mentioned.

I have a restored 263 2 row 3 point cultivator that has "tunnel" shields.  I will try to remember to get a picture but they are basically a 1 piece shield that is on both sides of the row and goes all the way over the top.

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Dr Evil....you obviously haven't been out in areas where the weeds are resistant to every chemical in the portfolio!  Cultivator use is once again on the upswing, both from the above, and from organic farms.   Dad's 4 row cultivator had the slide shields similar to that....trashed em years agos.   Those may not even be IH....just like today, a lot of companies made "accessories" for common things like cultivators, and farmers bought what they felt wee the most cost effective.

My cousin farms organic, and he told me the other day that the old slide shields like that are getting hard to find.  He uses JD cultivators, though.   As noted, uses those when cultivating the small stuff.

One real advantage of those over the rolling shields was they did not have a "center" bearing right over the row, where they had to be removed or lifted up for taller crops.  I still cultivate corn (have my cultivator fitted out to sidedress as well) and the last few years have been tough.  The corn is so variable, 3" to 2' within a few 100 feet.   You need rolling shields down in the bad spots, and them off in the good areas.  I'm designing my own rolling shields with "no center"....using disk opener bearings and an arm on each side of each row unit.  I have the prototype done, and looks good.  Hope to have them on for next year.

 

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These were designed for corn and cotton per the manual description. But he using it for potatoes and other vegetables ?. 
Was there another model for vegetables?

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3 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Dad used to store the cultivator against the back wall of the machine shed, the two front sections side-by-side against the back wall but with the lift cylinders to the outside and then lay planks, 2x12's on top of them and set the rear gang and the fenders on the planks. Fenders were removed when laying by corn.  Carrying those fenders was a finger pinching job of the worst kind.  Dad put rolling shields on as soon as Tractor Supply started carrying them. He was not impressed. I cultivated with them a year, maybe 2.

I think you would be surprised how many of those fenders got scrapped.  The idea was they would keep dirt off the shovels from covering the tiny plants, and as the plants got taller you raised the fenders to let more dirt get around the plants.  Root balls from last year's corn would get stuck between the fenders on a row, mash the corn or beans down quite a ways if it happened on a row you weren't watching. I normally watched the inside right row, and glanced at the outside right row a couple times in a quarter mile. Left side I'd check 2-3 times in a quarter mile.

Max Armstrong had a segment on U.S. Farm Report a bit over a month ago about a couple Midwest farmers cultivating corn again. And I guarentee you they are not using fenders!  All used 3 pt hitch cultivators, guidance systems,  auto-steer, and tractors with cab and AC.  One guy had a unique tool, he hill dropped his corn, not drilled, same thing Dad did 50-60 years ago, instead of a single seed every 4 to 5 inches, he planted 3-4 seeds in a clump every 12 to 16 inches. And he had a tool mounted above the cultivator with a motor that turned a horizontal disk with a rod running down over the row that was set to the outside of the disk, and a crescent shaped shovel on the end of the rod cultivated between the clumps of plants by revolving, spinning as the tractor moved forward. Each row had a photo eye to control speed so the sweep always missed the corn.  I didn't see any weeds in the fields but it looked like these cultivators were capable of getting every weed in a field.  I can't imagine cultivating coming back into rowcrop farming. Too many $100,000+ sprayers around.

Wished I could have seen that program ,sounds interesting 

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I did see a manual on eBay for a four row cultivation unit for a C , I can’t imagine that I have a hard time handling  two rows 

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I see they have a side dressing attached also in the photos . Again I remember dad had that attachment 

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We used home built scratch harrow instead of shovels the first time thru for corn or beans. Piece of rod or pipe for a shank welded to a 2' length of angle with old spike teeth welded to the angle iron. On a 2 row C you need 4 of em. Wasn't pretty but really effective plus you didn't have to drive at a crawl. This was also the norm for the 1st couple  times thru tobacco. I never used fenders on a front mount only rear mounted. The rolling fenders on a 6 row rear mount were the bomb for wiping out several feet of row when pulling thru morning glories. Of course, that wasn't my fault...... 

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Had a 4 row 30" front mount on the 656 with those fenders........end of the day all you saw was little green shoots between those black walls.....see them in your sleep......yuck.......

I hated it and I didn't even have to cultivate that much!

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This is the hot set up
I found the other sides , assumed that they fell off shed wall and elements got them . I think I will see if my sheet metal fabricators In Akron are still in business, a lot changes in 20 years. Hope so but I haven’t had any luck yahoo.

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4 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

This is the hot set up
I found the other sides , assumed that they fell off shed wall and elements got them . I think I will see if my sheet metal fabricators In Akron are still in business, a lot changes in 20 years. Hope so but I haven’t had any luck yahoo.

I’ve got 4-left and 4-right ones here that are solid. This isn’t a 4-sale add but you can send me a message if you want. I promise I’ll be nicer than the “sheet metal fabricators” ?

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When Dad bought the Farmall H in winter of 46 he got the new fangled tunnel shields plus the regular ones shown up top. The tunnel shield was about 6 inches or so across and half moon.  That worked like a charm as you could go a good speed on that first time through the corn.  No root balls as in those days it was small grain, corn rotation. 

When corn got taller you just raised the shield and threw the dirt under shield but still protected corn from dirt covering it from the top. Then took them off as corn got tall enough.  

I worked at IH dealer, starting in 58 and never saw that style shield.  People tried every thing you can think of. The tunnel like shown, rolling shields of several types and the   Yetter that was like a disk blade. 

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