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My wife and I were discussing our vegetable garden last night. We only utilize about half of the given space. I stopped tilling it around the first part of August when the plants got too big, it's ugly. Now with the pumpkin patch, some of the bigger stuff might work it's way out there where it's easier to cultivate. I also wouldn't miss the workout with the troy bilt tiller.

I mentioned raised beds. They would be used for stuff like tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, and maybe some other things. We really don't plant much other than that anyway. Does anyone have any experience with raised beds? I'm just curious how they are set up and maintained. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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We have 5 in the yard, peas, strawberries, beans, beets, cucumber, carrots, lettuce and chives this year they are raised about a foot, they are fairly easy to maintain, we have done a few hills of potatoes before but I think they are better off in the ground

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Granddaughter made a half dozen this year. She loves them. A suggestion.... make them tall, narrow(er) and long. Tall enough that you don't have to lean over, and narrow enough that you can reach everything from either side. In-laws did "square foot" gardening several years ago. It is just a variation of raised beds. They liked it, they just aren't gardeners. We built one this spring for strawberries. I just built it out of stuff I had laying around. My mistake, not tall enough, and to wide. But..... I will admit that I do a much better job of weeding it than I do a normal bed. Whenever I walked by it just became habit to pull any weeds because I didn't have to stoop over or use a hoe. For a hoe I just used one of those hand held hoe things.

Bottom line, I would definitely build more.

PS: I think I would vary the height to what I was planting, Taller for short plants, short for taller plants. So that any harvesting would be at a comfortable height. Just think of a workbench with dirt. Come to think of it, that pretty much describes my workbench.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, dads706 said:

Granddaughter made a half dozen this year. She loves them. A suggestion.... make them tall, narrow(er) and long. Tall enough that you don't have to lean over, and narrow enough that you can reach everything from either side. In-laws did "square foot" gardening several years ago. It is just a variation of raised beds. They liked it, they just aren't gardeners. We built one this spring for strawberries. I just built it out of stuff I had laying around. My mistake, not tall enough, and to wide. But..... I will admit that I do a much better job of weeding it than I do a normal bed. Whenever I walked by it just became habit to pull any weeds.

Bottom line, I would definitely build more.

PS: I think I would vary the height to what I was planting, Taller for short plants, short for taller plants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's kind of what I was thinking. Get some treated 2x12 and make some boxes about six feet wide by the lenght of the existing garden. Space the beds far enough to mow in between and then plant grass in between them. The garden I have now is just too much wasted space.

 I also started to think of all the other options such as covering one and running a line from my outdoor boiler to heat the ground to start something like sweet corn super early. 

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6 feet wide is to wide. You can't reach the center from either side. I think mine is probably 5' and my next ones will be no more than 4'. But, I'm talking strawberries, carrots, onions etc.

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We have seven old wooden feed bunks, just one 2X12 high and they work GREAT!!!

You don't have to bend over to weed, and the strawberries and cherry tomatoes are exactly the right height when you go by on the Cub Cadet......:D

I would be hesitant to use treated lumber......I have used raw linseed oil to kind of waterproof some planks I have replaced.

Pics tomorrow if you want...

Mike

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I have used rusted out tin water troughs for years. I clean cattle pens to fill or refill them. Soil is real poor around the house so need use dirt out corral and barn as fertilizer,and we need to water too. I have trouble with everybody wanting different stuff and they get over filled. On bigger round ones a pumpkin goes in the middle. The runners end up putting the pumpkins over the side out on the ground.

 

Must be popular out here as I see leaky water troughs on craigslist for 50 bucks and they don't stay up to long. I may have to buy some more galvanized as I am running out. And the blue plastic ones are out lasting metal.

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12 hours ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

My wife and I were discussing our vegetable garden last night. We only utilize about half of the given space. I stopped tilling it around the first part of August when the plants got too big, it's ugly. Now with the pumpkin patch, some of the bigger stuff might work it's way out there where it's easier to cultivate. I also wouldn't miss the workout with the troy bilt tiller.

I mentioned raised beds. They would be used for stuff like tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, and maybe some other things. We really don't plant much other than that anyway. Does anyone have any experience with raised beds? I'm just curious how they are set up and maintained. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Our raised beds are 4x8,  constructed of eastern hemlock and northern white cedar.  The photo below was taken a few years ago when my wife was undergoing cancer treatment.  Hence the fallow beds and the buckwheat green manure.   

The hemlock 1x material has held up surprisingly well.  I purchased several board feet a few years earlier when a local mill was closing,  and decided to use it even knowing it might eventually decay.  Except for the interior corners, all boards are still sound and in use today, ten years after construction.  This season I began replacing the interior corners with short lengths of 3x3 aluminum angle making corners.  The exposed end grain on the interior corners absorbed too much moisture and rot.  Besides being more durable the aluminum exterior corners will cover the  end grain of the side boards.  The stiffeners along the side and the center bar stabilize and prevent spreading.   I found the aluminum angle on CL. 

The 4-foot width  works well for hoop house construction from bent metal conduit, extending the growing season.  Seeding and weeding the interior rows at 48-inch width gets more difficult each year.  Anything wider might be a pain.

Good luck with the beds! 

garden_beds.jpg

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