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A nice load of big Upper Michigan hardwood


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I haven't put anything from work on here in a while. I went put and got this load today off of one of our jobs. It's a load of oversize mixed hardwood. Hard and soft maple, ash, a few birch, and some basswood.  Some  of the bigger sticks measure 36 inches across. Usually anything that big has a rotten center but not this load, they were all good.

20200916_145329.jpg

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Good looking load. 

   Kinda funny to me anyway.        We bought a 445? Timco  out of the UP.   He keep telling us that they had big timber.     He even cut a big oak ( not sure what kind it was )  it was 18_20" stump.        The job we where on was smallest 20" stump .   There big trees was are small limits.        

Just kinda funny with geographic differences  and past logging practices i guess 

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I bought an IH TD15-C dozer from a guy near Rapid River about 13 years ago. He mainly hauled wood with a truck and pup, but used the dozer for plowing. I hauled wood with a truck and pup in Minnesota. Could not haul that much then (5 axles total). They can haul more now but need 6 axles, nothing like Michigan though.

DWF

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But on another note. 88,000 is are max gross weight  80,000 + 10% for not being a weighed product, or a raw product. ( we can't weigh them in the woods )  you guys blow that out of the water lol

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I think this the first time I have seen them perpendicular to road ,why ? Short 

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14 minutes ago, 560Dennis said:

I think this the first time I have seen them perpendicular to road ,why ? Short 

100 inch logs

Mike

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32 minutes ago, Missouri Mule said:

Cool. What part of UP you hauling. Just went to ironwood last summer for vacation. My folks parents lived there working in the mines. 

I'm in the South central part of the UP, Ironwood is about a three or four hour drive from me. A co-worker and I went to Bessmer last fall to pick up a cat no12 road grader my boss bought for maintaining woods roads and plowing snow.

 

11 minutes ago, 560Dennis said:

I think this the first time I have seen them perpendicular to road ,why ? Short 

These logs will be sawn into pallet decking, they are 88 inches long. 40 inch pallets so they will cut two boards out of the length and have 8 inches to spare for trimming square. My first winter working there they had a job that had some maple veneer, those were 10 foot logs and were hauled lenghtwise.

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Around here cant'z,(?) is the pallet lumber.  then you get ties ( RR ties ) log cut 8'.6" .  can be pretty good especially if you can get cross ties,  For the intersections 14-16' +6"   but most of the market is grade lumber.   Best is veneer.

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11 hours ago, ottofreise said:

Love Michigan trucks, just put more axles where you can and haul like crazy. Nice truck😁

   We owned a 1979  International Michigan Special  5000 Paystar,   855,  Spicer trans,  2 speed rear,  4 axels under a 18 foot "Sugar Beet" box.

It Became a Michigan Special "Silage"  truck,  Weighed 28,000 empty,   Manufacture in The thumb of Michigan,  "Thumb Truck Company"  installed the Steel box and Cylinders on the Chassis.

That Many axels made it difficult to turn on a muddy headland when loaded with corn silage, only rear axle lifted.

We purchased the truck in 1990 at a consignment sale in the Michigan Thumb area, 15 trucks in the line up,  $12,000. was the average price of the Sugar Beet trucks.

1992 we purchased another "Sugar Beet Michigan special "  International 1850B cab over, 466, Allison, 18 foot steel box,  4 axels on the ground.

Michigan Special's are extra heavy Duty,   I know our trucks are Triple Framed,  with  a over built front axel and rims , rear leaf springs.

I know there is more info about these "Michigan Special" trucks,  I don't know all of the specs.

Jim Droscha

 

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Thanks for posting , I appreciate knowing how others make a living ,also  thank you for your hard work , being retire I ve lost focus on the fact someone is hauling logs to make skids , on the skid comes goodS and serviceS that make retirement a blessing. Amen 

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Nice looking load of logs. Wish we had more hardwood options around here. Birch and poplar are about it and neither are very good. Some nice birch in pockets but if it’s over a foot in diameter odds are pretty good it’s goong to have some rot in it. 

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That is interesting.  Thank you for posting.

Years ago, I heard the "Michigan Hauler" rule was 11 axles and load it as heavy as you care to.  Is this correct?  If so, do you know what your highest gross weight has been?

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1 hour ago, EquipmentJunkie said:

That is interesting.  Thank you for posting.

Years ago, I heard the "Michigan Hauler" rule was 11 axles and load it as heavy as you care to.  Is this correct?  If so, do you know what your highest gross weight has been?

Don't ask a log truck driver that question and expect an honest answer.  All joking aside, if I do my math correctly my maximum gross weight is 154,000. The truck weight in at 55,000 empty so that gives me just under 100,000 of payload. The only time I go over a scale is when I take pulp to the paper mill. The heaviest I've been scaled in at was just under 172,000...oops.  Wood is so inconsistent its really hard to know with any degree of accuracy how heavy the load actually is

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11 axles total is the most, depending on trailer and axle combination. I think a 5 and 3 can haul 168k, more popular are super trains and break-up 28's and both can haul 164k. Lately a lot of bigger operators are hauling sugar beets direct to the processing stations after getting loaded off of the headland with a Ropa Maus or Holmer Terra Felis. Doubles and 8 axle trailers are very popular in our area in the last 10 years. I have scaled around 175 once, with only 425 hp, that Pete wasnt exactly running away with the load. The next load was 10k less.🤔

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I see a lot of trucks with 7 axles pulling a 4 axle pup. Somehow that combination gives you the most allowable gross weight. 

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2 hours ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

Don't ask a log truck driver that question and expect an honest answer.  All joking aside, if I do my math correctly my maximum gross weight is 154,000. The truck weight in at 55,000 empty so that gives me just under 100,000 of payload. The only time I go over a scale is when I take pulp to the paper mill. The heaviest I've been scaled in at was just under 172,000...oops.  Wood is so inconsistent its really hard to know with any degree of accuracy how heavy the load actually is

We use to haul marble chips to bag for landscaping stone. Using a walking floor trailer you scale in, go up to the quarry then come back and scale out.

The first time in the quarry I told the loader operator what I needed and how much to put on. Between him being new, and my first time in the quarry, he misunderstood me and loaded the trailer with 4 buckets, probably 7-8 yard bucket(?) 

I got back down to the scales and about crapped myself when I saw it go over 140,000 pounds😱

I said to the woman in the scale house there was no way I was running that heavy and I needed to off load some of it! 
The problem was, that walking floor was not going to move, I got lucky when they said they had a long reach excavator there! 

 

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8 hours ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

Don't ask a log truck driver that question and expect an honest answer.  All joking aside, if I do my math correctly my maximum gross weight is 154,000. The truck weight in at 55,000 empty so that gives me just under 100,000 of payload. The only time I go over a scale is when I take pulp to the paper mill. The heaviest I've been scaled in at was just under 172,000...oops.  Wood is so inconsistent its really hard to know with any degree of accuracy how heavy the load actually is

WHEN I LOGGED MY TRUCK WAS A MACK. SEAMS LIKE IT HAULED MORE WEIGHT AFTER 2 IN THE MORNING...LOL

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45 minutes ago, farmall666 said:

WHEN I LOGGED MY TRUCK WAS A MACK. SEAMS LIKE IT HAULED MORE WEIGHT AFTER 2 IN THE MORNING...LOL

...Yes !!!....likewise down under.......funny   that...guess it was because  you couldn't see   the cheater pins   in the dark...just keep piling them on....

Mike

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9 hours ago, TractormanMike.mb said:

Don't ask a log truck driver that question and expect an honest answer.  All joking aside, if I do my math correctly my maximum gross weight is 154,000. The truck weight in at 55,000 empty so that gives me just under 100,000 of payload. The only time I go over a scale is when I take pulp to the paper mill. The heaviest I've been scaled in at was just under 172,000...oops.  Wood is so inconsistent its really hard to know with any degree of accuracy how heavy the load actually is

/......great picture   !!!......is your truck   triple drive with  two airlift axles  ???........loading like that would be a pain....but quite obvious how you load.......Spent several years loading longs    ...using the excavator....very quick loading out  20 foot plus logs......

I guess 'mud '  would be your biggest  headache......!!

Mike

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2 hours ago, mike newman said:

/......great picture   !!!......is your truck   triple drive with  two airlift axles  ???........loading like that would be a pain....but quite obvious how you load.......Spent several years loading longs    ...using the excavator....very quick loading out  20 foot plus logs......

I guess 'mud '  would be your biggest  headache......!!

Mike

Thanks. My employer owns the truck. The front two axles are lift as well as the rear most axle. I drop the one directly ahead of the drives right away after I load the truck to take some of the weight off of the drive axles unless I have to make a really sharp corner. Loading isnt too bad but I've been doing it for a year and a half now. On average I would say it takes me about an hour to load the truck and pup. Pulp is a pain to load because it tends to be more crooked and it's smaller wood. Keeping the load straight can be a challenge. Pulp is cut at 100 inches so that doesn't give much room for ones to stick out and not be overwidth. I do carry a small chain saw to trim after the truck is loaded

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