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These oil questions are related to modern gas engine cars and light trucks

Castrol GTX Magnatec has anyone seen issues caused by this oil? 

 Adding Zinc or Moly oil supplements to modern engines

I understand they were removed for emissions reasons would there be any harm in using them?

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1 hour ago, jeeper61 said:

These oil questions are related to modern gas engine cars and light trucks

Castrol GTX Magnatec has anyone seen issues caused by this oil? 

 Adding Zinc or Moly oil supplements to modern engines

I understand they were removed for emissions reasons would there be any harm in using them?

I can’t comment on the oil, however my thought goes to the engineering of these modern engines and the knowledge that these additives in the oils wouldn’t be available for use. Just my 2cents

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Zinc additives are usually recommended for breaking in a cam on an older flat tappet or non roller cam.  
 

Modern engines don’t need it as much as an older one does. 
 

Not saying it would hurt anything , just saying it probably dosent need it. 
 

What’s your definition of modern ? 

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2019 

I started running the Castrol GTX Magnatec in my GM Ecotec Turbos those are 2007 and 2009.

It did quiet down the start up clatter and the MPG picked 3/4-1 MPG.

The in the scar tests the oils with higher zinc and moly levels do real well so with modern US spec oils using less I thought I might try it.  

I was wondering how the zinc impacted the emissions equipment.

I run the zinc additive in all the flat tappet cam stuff already so I have it.

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2 hours ago, lightninboy said:

Can get 200,000 miles or so out of most motor oils these days....

It's legal to use high-mileage high-zinc high-phosphorus motor oil, so what harm could come of it?

Only hurts your wallet, but really, other than flat tappets with high pressure on them it really doesn't serve any purpose. Tappet loading on a modern engine is light and the cam follower is lubricated hydro dynamically - it's skiing on a film of oil. If a roller tappet, same. Older flat-tappet engines, especially those with a heavy valve train/springs have the cam and lifters lubricated in a mixed method - lubricated hydro-dynamically and on a boundary layer created by the zinc phosphate in the oil. That's an extremely hard film formed on the cam surface and protects under heavy load.

Anyway, using it won't hurt anything but perhaps your converter but it won't help anything unless you have an engine that needs it.

Edit: Beware so called high zinc oils as often the label is marketing. Since most oils now have little zinc any oil with more than a little can call itself "high zinc". If you really want high zinc you need to look up the actual content rather than relying on the marketing statement.

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 Thinking about it every thing I have had has gone 200K plus and by then, in New England, it is toast from rust if it has been used in the winter.

After researching it the ash from the ZDDP can plug the converter if the engine uses oil.

There may be some benefit in the valve train like the rocker arm and push rod areas.

So likely not worth the effort on a roller cam motor  

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