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6 minutes ago, Dasnake said:

That’s a blackbird isn’t it, mom and I just listened what a great flick,

2301 mpg, pretty quick.

SR-71 Blackbird, yessir

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3 hours ago, lorenzo said:

Pretty cool.   
 

Some of the smartest men on Earth In control of those machines. 

Of all the computer controlled systems on that plane, the ones that impress me most are the minds of the men controlling them. You can't duplicate with wires in a box!

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10 hours ago, Dasnake said:

That’s a blackbird isn’t it, mom and I just listened what a great flick,

2301 mpg, pretty quick.

If your driving down I-80  West of Omaha and you want to see one , stop at the Strategic Air Command museum  AKA  SAC  and you can get a good look at one up close . 

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Just think of the brainy smurfs that were working at Lockheed's Skunk Works dreaming that design up.......in the 60s.....without whiz bang computers.......in that perspective......exceptionally cool!

The phone I'm typing this on has more computing power than an Apollo spacecraft.......some really smart minds in our past!!!

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That's always been a favorite of mine.

Nowadays everyone has a readout. I remember when I first started flying glass cockpits with inertial navigation and got magic readouts like ground speed, TAS, and wind direction. Flying above the airline guys flying Jurassic Jets and smugly listening as they asked for a heading to somewhere until they could pick up a VOR while we could just push a button. The freight guys flying pistons would be asking for a speed readout as it was a lot faster/easier than cranking a wiz wheel around. They were lucky to have anything working. My Cessna now has better navigation equipment than the first jets I flew.

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Watched that video a zillion times, and still love it.  The story jives with an experience I had, back in the day, when I was still a productive member of society, during a night shift at the Fairchild Command Post.  I was contacted by an SR-71 needing fuel. I did some coordinating for them to meet one of our tankers.  The SR was over northern Montana, the tanker was flying a track in Arizona.  Had a brief BS session with the SR, and was told to "tell your boys we'll be down there in 30 minutes."  Don't know how many miles per hour that equates to, but Montana, across northern Idaho, and then hang a left over eastern Washington, is quick, lol.  BK. 

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Truly hilarious. 
If you’re gonna hang at the highest levels you better be able to bust balls with the best.

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4 hours ago, Mr. Plow said:

Just think of the brainy smurfs that were working at Lockheed's Skunk Works dreaming that design up.......in the 60s.....without whiz bang computers.......in that perspective......exceptionally cool!

The phone I'm typing this on has more computing power than an Apollo spacecraft.......some really smart minds in our past!!!

The Inside Skunkworks podcast is worth listening to, they cover the Kelley Johnson days up to some of their current projects.

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1 hour ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Makes me thing of Randy Sogn.    RIP

X2. RIP Randy

If I remember correctly, the SR-71 would leak fuel on the ground but would seal up once everything warmed up and expanded in flight. Seems like the whole plane stretched several inches from thermal expansion in flight. I can't imagine the engineering required. 

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Didn't most of the titanium used to build the Blackbirds come from the Soviet Union? Seems I recall a story from the Cold War about how the CIA came up with some fake company in another country that was used to buy the titanium from Russia as they knew the Russians wouldn't sell titanium directly to a US company. 

Like you guys say, the technology behind the Blackbird was cutting edge, to say the least.

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1 minute ago, SDman said:

Didn't most of the titanium used to build the Blackbirds come from the Soviet Union? Seems I recall a story from the Cold War about how the CIA came up with some fake company in another country that was used to buy the titanium from Russia as they knew the Russians wouldn't sell titanium directly to a US company. 

Like you guys say, the technology behind the Blackbird was cutting edge, to say the least.

I believe you're correct. Russia does have the largest proven deposits.

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There was a post about a plane that buzzed a tractor trailer and might have been Mr Randy Sohn that had posted it? Does anyone have a link to that? 

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7 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

X2. RIP Randy

If I remember correctly, the SR-71 would leak fuel on the ground but would seal up once everything warmed up and expanded in flight. Seems like the whole plane stretched several inches from thermal expansion in flight. I can't imagine the engineering required. 

The plane grew by several inches due to the heat when flying.  In the Skunkworks podcast they talk about send engine oil specifications out for somebody to develop an oil that would handle the heat, the first sample they got back was a powder that turned to liquid at operating temperatures so they had to specify that it had to remain a liquid at very cold temperatures.  That was the beginning of the synthetic lubricants industry.

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1 hour ago, Cliff Neubauer said:

The plane grew by several inches due to the heat when flying.  In the Skunkworks podcast they talk about send engine oil specifications out for somebody to develop an oil that would handle the heat, the first sample they got back was a powder that turned to liquid at operating temperatures so they had to specify that it had to remain a liquid at very cold temperatures.  That was the beginning of the synthetic lubricants industry.

Actually not true. The Germans late in WWII were making and using synthetics, both fuel and oil because most of their access to dino oil had been cut off or drastically reduced (they failed to take the fields in the Caucasus area and the Romanian fields were don't to about 20% production) . After the was dino oil and fuel was so cheap that until the SR71 there was no need for it so it was kinda put on hold until needed. Other than aircraft use it didn't hit mainstream until the oil embargo in the 70's. But the technology for synthetics is old. 

Historical Facts(borrowed from wayback machine since synlube website was down) 1877 C. Friedler and J.M. Crafts synthesize the first "synthetic" hydrocarbons. 1913 Friedrich Bergius in Germany develops Hydrogenation process for production of synthetic oil from coal dust 1921 Standard Oil in USA produces one barrel of synthetic oil from one ton of shale rock 1921 Friedrich Bergius in Germany develops commercial process for hydrogenation of coal to synthetic oil 1925 In Germany Franz Fisher and Hans Tropsch develop Synthetic Oil industrial production process 1926 I.G. Farben acquired the patent rights to the Bergius hydrogenation process for production of synthetic oil from coal 1927 I.G. Farben's Leuna works start synthetic oil production 1929 Standard Oil of Indiana makes the first attempt at commercial development of synthetic hydrocarbons Many gallons of synthetic oil were made by polymerization of different olefins. 1930-34 Union Carbide and Carbon Corp develop and investigate the applications of water soluble Polyalkylene Glycol (PAG) 1931 Nobel Prize for Chemistry: Friedrich Bergius & Carl Bosch Invention and development of chemical high pressure methods (used for synthetic oil production) 1932 I.G. Farben investment into synthetic fuels production from coal 1936 Adolf Hitler in Germany starts Major synthetic fuels and oil program 1937 First Polyalphaolefins were synthesized 1939 Fischer-Tropsh process that used carbon monoxide and hydrogen to make synthetic oils and fuels was commercialized in Germany 1942-45 PAG synthetic oils used in fleets and commercial vehicles 1944-1954 10% of German supply of lubricating oil is "synthetic", made by using three different processes 1944 US Army aircraft operating in Alaska and Canada use PAG engine oils 1944-45 The idea of using colloidal solids in synthetic fluids for lubrication of the first jet engines is tested and researched in Germany 1946 National Carbide Company, Inc. markets the "First" commercial PAG engine oils Prestone Motor Oil 1946 New York Power & Light Corp uses PAG engine oils in variety of their commercial vehicles. 1942-1955 Diester oils used in turbine engines because Petroleum oil simply was inadequate to meet the demands of these engines. 1962 Texaco produces Synthetic Aircraft Turbine Oil 1962-66 U.S. Army experiences significant problems in operating vehicles and equipment in Alaska with MIL-L-10295 Lubricating Oil. 

Rick

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I've got Brian Shul's Sled Driver books that this story is from.  Very spendy, but what treasures.

Little bit of virtually unknown trivia- when they made that last record breaker cross country flight to deliver a bird to the Smithsonian, it was talked about to make the attempt at Mach 3.FIVE.  The jet was very capable of doing so, but the risk of having a compressor unstart and losing the aircraft was deemed unacceptable.

Also, the reason there was never an around-the-world record attempt by the Blackbirds is because there weren't enough of the KC-135Q tankers to have a spare tanker available at every refueling point that would have been necessary to circle the globe and mitigate the risk of losing the Blackbird because it couldn't get gas if the primary tanker broke.

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