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Harvest full swing in Almond orchards


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4 hours ago, Lazy WP said:

I think they grind about anything and everything for dairy cows. I haul a lot of soybean hull pellets to dairies. Have hauled cotton seed hulls, you see large piles of corn cobs, from the seed corn plants, and they grind them for cow feed. 
I have seen guys unloading DDG, that use a sort of maul. They called it an Almond Knocker? You ever use something like that?

We used to get loads of distillers out of Kentucky for dairy cow feed. Sure smelled good. Cows loved it.

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Even though I am suppose to be retired I still get to play Farmer on my small Almond orchard  Many of you may remember the posts of me removing a vineyard in 2015  and planting these sticks Janua

Thank You .  Since a kid I would always read the Farm Journal and been intrigued by farming in the Mid West.  Could never visit because of family and farming kept me busy.   Since joini

Everything I know about any kind of farming other than corn, soybeans and cattle outside of central IL I owe to people like Tony who take time to share how things work.  So thanks to all of you who Ta

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On 9/3/2020 at 6:43 PM, IHhogfarmer said:

Very informative Tony, thanks for sharing! 
 

I had the chance to share with the people in my area (Northeast CO) about almond and cotton growing when I had @Tonyinca on our FFA radio show back on March 19th. Out here we are dry land, some irrigated of corn, wheat, millet, hay of course as well as others crops. But what Tony does was foreign to what we knew out here. Having Tony on the show he went in depth about what is involved in growing cotton and almonds, oh and of course we talked a little about tractors too😀
 

I did the FFA radio show for my chapter for two school years....... until corona cut the second short 😢 Tony was my final guest on the show, and a great show and great way to finish it was. Thank you for doing it Tony! ☺️

Since March I've tuned into a few on line go to meeting presentations on different subjects. It's just an idea but what if you you hosted a meeting with Tony as the speaker. You could work with Tony on a power point with some photos and you could interview him like you did on the radio. We could ask questions, both live and via chat room. You could interview some others on the board as well.

I'd offer to help but I'm challenged sometime getting on some of the presentations I watch / listen LOL

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WP  😉 Tony's part of the world is always up with the latest tech. Now my world over here in the "back woods" I know what you mean. 😉 Think of wood club about the size of a baseball bat.Has 6 to 10 inches of rubber on the end you hit the tree limb with. 

Paso Robles was the first almond growing region in California. But that day is a long way past. The last almonds planted here was in the 70's. But I know I can show you 75 year old trees that have not been tended in 40 years. None of the big dust stirring sweepers Tony has. Here was a home built sled about 30 foot long. There was canvas on one side you pulled out so as you hit limbs with knocker club all nuts fall on canvas. Then with nuts on canvas you pulled it back so all nuts where in the sled. Horses where used to pull sleds long after they where not used for any other farm work. But crawler tractors where used as well. More nuts where shoveled into burlap sack than where handled bulk. But at the end most used a elevator and shoveled nuts to elevator into a truck and to the local huller.  

 

Gee Tony if you would of got that business education before you lived it. Cal Poly did give me a degree in Ag Business Management in 78, but I still just farmed because I thought it was fun. Never wanted to have to think for help so I never had much help. My dad never finished his last year of high school because his dad rented 200 acres to farm 10 miles from the home farm in 1929. My dad was sent with 6 to 8 horses and was on his own 6 days at a time. So dad sent all his kids to college.

 

A old joke around here was call them amounds cause you knocked the L out of them getting them off the tree.

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2 hours ago, Raildudes dad said:

Since March I've tuned into a few on line go to meeting presentations on different subjects. It's just an idea but what if you you hosted a meeting with Tony as the speaker. You could work with Tony on a power point with some photos and you could interview him like you did on the radio. We could ask questions, both live and via chat room. You could interview some others on the board as well.

I'd offer to help but I'm challenged sometime getting on some of the presentations I watch / listen LOL

Hummm, I’ve not thought about this idea and I like it. I’ll have to continue to think about it. 
 

Like I say I’m not doing the show anymore because I’m out of FFA. But it would be fun to pick up something similar to the radio show again. 
 

It would be a great way to get forum members more connected to each other..... so down the road I’ll have to make a thread here about it, some ideas, and who would be interested. 
 

It may be a like 9 months or so before I could start doing something, I just got done with my first full week of college and a couple of my classes will cause🤯 so my suggestion is to keep your eyes open here on coffee shop when I start looking into it more....... or at least until I get some stuff more in control. 
 

Again thank you for planting the idea! I will definitely be saying something about it again

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1 hour ago, Lazy WP said:

Yep that’s exactly what I was talking about. 

Okay , I did not understand  . 
yes when I got involved in Almonds in 1973 mallets and tarps were still used on first and second crop trees . As knockers . Farm labor was having labor union problems in central Cal and every thing was being done to cut labor .
In the seventies and  eighties much UC Davis research as acres increased .mechanization , irrigation , insect control , have all changed dramatically . 
Figure ! ,when I started , CaLic.  Had approx 175, 000 acres in production and 250 million lbs production . Today industry is estimating 3 Billion lbs on nearly 900 thousand acres. 
Paso Robles area  , Ray54 ‘s area , was the premier almond growing area 40, 50 , 60 , before I even knew almonds , other candy covered almonds that we bought at Black oak Restaurant  In Paso Robles , on way to Pismo  .Dry Land Almond farming most part . Today there a few almond orchards left , well up in age but Paso Robles has transformed from Almonds and Cattle to Vineyards irrigated by drip irrigation and Boutique wineries and horse ranches ! A few of the old family money still farm grains and raise cattle which I love to see , they are the real farmers imho 

the vineyards and wineries are investment dollars and tax rite offs , imho !

tony

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Very interesting Tony, I read a post on RFD a couple hours ago .It sounds like California has a fantastic crop this year, way to go .

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3 hours ago, IKS said:

Very interesting Tony, I read a post on RFD a couple hours ago .It sounds like California has a fantastic crop this year, way to go .

    Thank You ! the Down side like most AG is big crop pushes prices lower .

   Tony

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4 hours ago, IKS said:

Very interesting Tony, I read a post on RFD a couple hours ago .It sounds like California has a fantastic crop this year, way to go .

I believe talk of the first almond crop to be over 3 billion pounds,I remember when they where worrying about the first 1 billion pound crop 20 years ago.

Back 20 to 30 years ago 1 million acres of cotton today 150,000 to 200,000 acres max. A good part of the us to be cotton acres are almonds and pistachio today.  

The organic walnuts near me are at such a low price they may not be harvested.

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9 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

wow tony, you climb every tree and shake it - how long does that take ? 

Hey now, Tony is a big guy- it would take him a lot less time than say a 98#-when-wet man.

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On 9/2/2020 at 8:18 PM, billonthefarm said:

  Everything I know about any kind of farming other than corn, soybeans and cattle outside of central IL I owe to people like Tony who take time to share how things work.  So thanks to all of you who Take time to post pics.  It is always appreciated!!!!!!!

Yes it is appreciated. Farming in Mich. sometimes looks boring when you can see what it's like in other parts of the country and world for that matter. Thanks Tony for your time to post. Very interesting 😄😄

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