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1/2" Hydraulic lines


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I want to reroute the 1/2" solid hydraulic lines on my front end loader, but have not found anyone that will work with the 1/2" tubing. I am in NW PA, does anyone know of anyone in the surrounding states that can make the lines and ship them? I have looked locally and on line, but have come up short. I really do not want to go with rubber hose for  this area.

Thank you for your time and help

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Try discounthydralichose.com.  I think they make lines and hose.  Making steel lines is neither rocket science nor expensive yet finding someone to make them is difficult.  I am looking to get the stuff to make my own steel lines.  Way cheaper to get into that than rubber lines.

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I’ve made my own lines already.  Only tools you need are tubing cutter and tubing benders for the correct size tubing.  You can get the materials from McMaster Carr.

       All it takes is a lot of patience........

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1 hour ago, Duntongw said:

Did you use flared fittings or ferrels? The flaring part is the expensive part if your buying tooling. I didn't know if the ferrels would hold up.

You have to flare it.  "Ferrule" is just a ring that is part of a compression fitting.  Compression fittings are not rated for most hydraulic pressures.  I won't even use them on hydraulic brake line, even though the industry seems to think that is ok.  I don't trust them in that application.  I'm not going to say none exist rated for 2400# pressures, because some engineer will come along and show some that are.  Let's just go with, you won't find any compression fittings rated for the hydraulic pressure your tractor makes.

Anyway, yes, flare.  And it has to be double flared to hold the pressure.  Also remember that hydraulics use a 37° flare and not a 45°.

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15 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Why not use black pipe and thread it. You can buy most adapters to fit pipethread.

Maybe he should go ahead and paint the tractor and loader with a paintbrush after he gets it plumbed. 

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25 minutes ago, J-Mech said:

 Compression fittings are not rated for most hydraulic pressures.  I won't even use them on hydraulic brake line, even though the industry seems to think that is ok.  I don't trust them in that application.  I'm not going to say none exist rated for 2400# pressures, because some engineer will come along and show some that are. 

Here in Iowa, I was always taught it's a big fine if a shop is caught using compression fittings on brake lines, but I see them come into my shop all the time, and I know the shop that is doing it. Heck, even Oreilly Auto Parts sells compression fittings for brake lines....I don't get it. It's not that difficult to cut and flare brake lines....

I was also taught that Copper is a no-no on brake lines, and was banned from being used sometime in the 60's...and now they've came out with nickle/copper line....

Travis

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7 minutes ago, J-Mech said:

Maybe he should go ahead and paint the tractor and loader with a paintbrush after he gets it plumbed. 

J mech you can do Whatever floats your boat.  For the rest of people on here.Lots of loaders used black or regular pipe for lines. You can bend it ,thread it put couplers on it. But what does a hick from up in Nodak know. Just pointing out a cheaper easier quick way to do it. 

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44 minutes ago, J-Mech said:

You have to flare it.  "Ferrule" is just a ring that is part of a compression fitting.  Compression fittings are not rated for most hydraulic pressures.  I won't even use them on hydraulic brake line, even though the industry seems to think that is ok.  I don't trust them in that application.  I'm not going to say none exist rated for 2400# pressures, because some engineer will come along and show some that are.  Let's just go with, you won't find any compression fittings rated for the hydraulic pressure your tractor makes.

Anyway, yes, flare.  And it has to be double flared to hold the pressure.  Also remember that hydraulics use a 37° flare and not a 45°.

Swadgelock makes a high pressure stainless steel line system that works well.

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Two of my 4 loaders came from the factory with iron pipes. Westendorf and Arps?(the sticker is long gone) were factory iron pipe, still working fine. My ih 2450 and 2355 still have the factory tubing. Thx-Ace 

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27 minutes ago, Sparky said:

I don't get it. It's not that difficult to cut and flare brake lines....

I was also taught that Copper is a no-no on brake lines, and was banned from being used sometime in the 60's...and now they've came out with nickle/copper line....

I agree about just flaring brake lines.  I do admit, when I bought a hydraulic flaring tool it made it so much easier.  Sometimes it's hard to get the necessary tooling in to do the work.  The hydraulic flaring tool is very large, but it is long, not wide like a flaring block and screw.  I love that tool. 

I don't know what to think of that copper/nickel line.  O'Reilly's tried to sell me on it and I wouldn't use it.  I finally tried a piece of it, and it did bend easy, but it was hard to flare because it was soft.  I still only stock and use steel.  

 

Dale, I'm not sure that iron pipe and fittings are cheaper than tubing and fittings.  Iron pipe and iron fittings are pretty expensive.  And ugly....

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18 minutes ago, kevinj said:

Swadgelock makes a high pressure stainless steel line system that works well.

Stainless steel is softer than steel.  I'm familiar with the Swedgelock stuff, but I don't like using it on hydraulics.  Or at least not anything with that high of pressures.  I consider a loader a pretty important device you do not want a failure on.  Like brakes.  I had a hydraulic hose blow on a loader I was using yesterday while moving round bales.  Not cool.  Thank goodness it didn't cause anything to fall, but it did make a mess, and it was very near my bare arm.  Again, not cool.  I much prefer steel line unless it needs to flex.... and although it's ugly, I'd have to go with Dale... iron pipe is pretty safe. Although its typical working pressure is about 1750# for 1/2", with a burst pressure of like 14,000# or some high number.  Just make sure you are using pipe rated for the pressures used. 

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Look into the stainless options from Parker or SwedgeLoc if you want to piece it together from fittings.  The 3/8" lines I am familiar with are good to 3000# or more working pressure.  Larger may be less or require more wall thickness.  Double ferrel fittings.

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2 hours ago, Sparky said:

was also taught that Copper is a no-no on brake lines, and was banned from being used sometime in the 60's...and now they've came out with nickle/copper line....

Travis

And it is the cat’s pajamas, doesn’t rust out haven’t had it fail yet, I keep a couple rolls on hand. Frankly here I think steel lines are a bigger danger, the coated ones rust out where they put stickers on and where the coating gets damaged by the flare tool clamp. I’ll take my chances with the nickel copper vs rusty junk every couple years.

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6 hours ago, Duntongw said:

I am in NW PA, does anyone know of anyone in the surrounding states

RJ Hydraulics in Butler, PA.  As much as I am disappointed with my valve stack experience they did an awesome job with the line on my IH 1460 that blew out.

I don’t think Allied Rubber in Ellwood City makes steel lines (hence the rubber) but ask for Travis to double check.

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7 hours ago, IHC5488 said:

Parker dealer near me bent everything I needed for a loader I restored a couple years ago.  Did a really nice job and all in ½" .  May have to zoom in a little bit.

IMG_20190105_173009177.thumb.jpg.80efb73075f36e3b22e13eb44cdadd23.jpg

IMG_20190107_190138477.thumb.jpg.78522e69511dac3da94b0c4f446b8020.jpg

 

Is that a 2450 on a 186 Hydro?

That belongs to a “member” here?

 

As far tubing versus iron pipe, I have been taught that iron pipe will create A LOT MORE HEAT due to friction than tubing.

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10 hours ago, J-Mech said:

Stainless steel is softer than steel.  I'm familiar with the Swedgelock stuff, but I don't like using it on hydraulics.  Or at least not anything with that high of pressures.  I consider a loader a pretty important device you do not want a failure on.  Like brakes.  I had a hydraulic hose blow on a loader I was using yesterday while moving round bales.  Not cool.  Thank goodness it didn't cause anything to fall, but it did make a mess, and it was very near my bare arm.  Again, not cool.  I much prefer steel line unless it needs to flex.... and although it's ugly, I'd have to go with Dale... iron pipe is pretty safe. Although its typical working pressure is about 1750# for 1/2", with a burst pressure of like 14,000# or some high number.  Just make sure you are using pipe rated for the pressures used. 

We have ran miles of the Swadgelock for industrial hydraulics.

And you are correct about the tube / pipe/ hose being for the application.

Swadgelock had stuff up to around 60.000 PSI, that should cover any tractor app!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

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Here are pics of two common loaders in the area over the years. The farmhand used galvanized pipe for lines around 50 years until tubing started to show up on newer ones in the end. The JD used pipe with threaded ends also. They look factory assembled never had oil problems with the pipe either.

F4A6C6B7-9C9C-4F05-9C19-C208BE441DEF.png

A583B726-2D29-43F2-8501-5E449EA11C43.png

98A82096-218F-4219-AC8A-E10E42AADF39.png

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There are so many "do this, don't do that...." you can get confused.  Here's my thoughts and what I was always taught:

1) NEVER use galvanized pipe on any fuel or hydraulic circuit.  The galvanizing can flake off and go into the system and damage pumps/etc.

2) Black Iron pipe is still the best choice for long lasting durability. Heavy, strong, hard to puncture, bend, or break.  Takes forever to rust thru.  And ugly.  :P 

3) Yes copper is a no-no on brakes...normal copper pipe is low pressure only.   

4) Steel pipe SHOULD have been outlawed on brake systems 50 years ago. I honestly can't understand why they have all these safety regulations about everything else...and then allow something that is GOING to fail catastrophically and quite possibly kill somebody.   Require ABS & all the other expensive stuff on brake systems, and don't fix the obvious most common failure point first???   I mean, come on--the brake pedal suddenly going to the floor is like--a meme in movies, etc!   If you have no clue what I am talking about, you must live down south and have never heard of road salt.  Here in IL any car over 10 years old is a 70 mph missile just waiting to happen.

5) Anybody that can bend and make steel hydraulic lines and keep the fitting from leaking...(BOWS respectfully with hands folded)

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56 minutes ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

There are so many "do this, don't do that...." you can get confused.  Here's my thoughts and what I was always taught:

1) NEVER use galvanized pipe on any fuel or hydraulic circuit.  The galvanizing can flake off and go into the system and damage pumps/etc.

2) Black Iron pipe is still the best choice for long lasting durability. Heavy, strong, hard to puncture, bend, or break.  Takes forever to rust thru.  And ugly.  :P 

3) Yes copper is a no-no on brakes...normal copper pipe is low pressure only.   

4) Steel pipe SHOULD have been outlawed on brake systems 50 years ago. I honestly can't understand why they have all these safety regulations about everything else...and then allow something that is GOING to fail catastrophically and quite possibly kill somebody.   Require ABS & all the other expensive stuff on brake systems, and don't fix the obvious most common failure point first???   I mean, come on--the brake pedal suddenly going to the floor is like--a meme in movies, etc!   If you have no clue what I am talking about, you must live down south and have never heard of road salt.  Here in IL any car over 10 years old is a 70 mph missile just waiting to happen.

5) Anybody that can bend and make steel hydraulic lines and keep the fitting from leaking...(BOWS respectfully with hands folded)

I hear what your saying. Farmhand was based out of South Dakota or Iowa. They used galvanized pipe on tens of thousands loaders. Granted they had their own hyd system but their pipes never caused a failure. Years ago before air seeders everybody had drill fill augers on their trucks. You don’t know how many trucks I plumbed with diverter valve , hand valve and couples mounted at drill step level. Threaded lots of pipe , made attaching clamps every job looked good. 

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I would like to thank everyone for the above conversation, very interesting. I have worked with flaring hydraulic lines before, but the tooling for 1/2" steel started north of $400 and is one of those things I would probably never use again.

The black pipe option was mentioned to me, probably would work, but yea, just doesn't look good. The other thing is you have various levels of thread forming, and high pressure is much better than standard NPT. Plenty of goop I guess.

Teachers Pet, thank you for the info. I had tried Allied, but they do not do it, I will try RJ Hydraulics in Butler, PA.

I never thought that this would be so tough to track down, but once you get above 3/8, it's a whole new ball game. I will let you know how I make out.

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6 hours ago, 1586 Jeff said:

Is that a 2450 on a 186 Hydro?

That belongs to a “member” here?

 

As far tubing versus iron pipe, I have been taught that iron pipe will create A LOT MORE HEAT due to friction than tubing.

It's a 2455 loader.  Yes it belongs to member on here, FarmallFan or BJ Kline

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