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2366 Combine - Struggling in Soybean Harvest


SleepyKnoll

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Good Afternoon All,

I was hoping to find some insight on what my problem is.  We have a 2004, 2366 Combine that we run a 1020 25' head on.  When cutting 60 bushel - dry (11% / 12%) beans, we are only creeping along at 1.3 mph and the combine still sounds like it can't handle the beans we are feeding it.

We had problems with our old rotor (one impeller was ripping out of front cone) and replaced it with the updated AFX rotor 3 years ago.  All other settings for the combine start at what the book suggests and then we go from there nudging them slightly for a clean sample.

My dad and I are no harvest experts, so I'm just looking for a little insight in why we struggle so much in soybeans.  Any insight is welcome!

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10 minutes ago, SleepyKnoll said:

Good Afternoon All,

I was hoping to find some insight on what my problem is.  We have a 2004, 2366 Combine that we run a 1020 25' head on.  When cutting 60 bushel - dry (11% / 12%) beans, we are only creeping along at 1.3 mph and the combine still sounds like it can't handle the beans we are feeding it.

We had problems with our old rotor (one impeller was ripping out of front cone) and replaced it with the updated AFX rotor 3 years ago.  All other settings for the combine start at what the book suggests and then we go from there nudging them slightly for a clean sample.

My dad and I are no harvest experts, so I'm just looking for a little insight in why we struggle so much in soybeans.  Any insight is welcome!

What speed are you running your rotor at ?

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When you say combine can’t handle it what do you mean?  Rotor slugging, engine rpm drop?   If motor sounds like either fuel or air restrictions unless bunch of hours

rotor could be concave closed too far with rotor running too slow more info helpful

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2 minutes ago, JessePeden said:

When you say combine can’t handle it what do you mean?  Rotor slugging, engine rpm drop?   If motor sounds like either fuel or air restrictions unless bunch of hours

rotor could be concave closed too far with rotor running too slow more info helpful

Rotor slugging, engine rpm drop.  White knuckling the steering wheel hoping and praying that you don't have to unplug the rotor.  Engine hours - 3234 / Rotor hours - 2366

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8 minutes ago, SleepyKnoll said:

Rotor slugging, engine rpm drop.  White knuckling the steering wheel hoping and praying that you don't have to unplug the rotor.

In high yielding beans like your quoting run your rotor at the highest suggested setting rpm for beans  + 50 and make sure your concave is set right are you cutting drilled beans or planted beans ? that makes a difference too Also are the stems green still if they are you need to let them dry more those are a killer too unplugging the rotor is the worst thing imaginable

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7 minutes ago, SleepyKnoll said:

Rotor slugging, engine rpm drop.  White knuckling the steering wheel hoping and praying that you don't have to unplug the rotor.  Engine hours - 3234 / Rotor hours - 2366

Engine and rotor hours are meaningless, want to know rotor rpm, concave clearance, chopper, fan speed...

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The first question you should always ask in soybeans---is my header feeding the beans smoothly, or are they bunching up.    I knew a case where a guy was running a rusty, worn 20' head, his head broke down, so he borrowed another 20' header.  The new head had stainless sheet cover sheets, polished trough, good reel fingers, and squared up cross auger flighting.  Same combine,  same beans, same day.  Difference - 1 mph with the old head, 4.5mph with the new head.   The ONLY difference was smooth even feeding.

So if your head is not feeding the combine smoothly, fix that first.  One of the biggest changes I've ever seen combining beans was from grinding the crossauger flighting square, so the front edge was not rounded back.  That sharp front edge lets it "cut into" and grab the bean stems, once it grabs them it drags them in and your golden.   I had both the flighting squared, and full finger installed....the squared up flighting did far more to feed the beans than the full finger.

Actually, jass....somebody did ask if the combine had high hours (low power)....

 

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10 minutes ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

The first question you should always ask in soybeans---is my header feeding the beans smoothly, or are they bunching up.    I new a case where a guy was running a rusty, worn 20' head, his head broke down, so he borrowed another 20' header.  The new head had stainless sheet cover sheets, polished trough, good reel fingers, and squared up cross auger flighting.  Same combine,  same beans, same day.  Difference - 1 mph with the old head, 4.5mph with the new head.   The ONLY difference was smooth even feeding.

So if your head is not feeding the combine smoothly, fix that first.  One of the biggest changes I've ever seen combining beans was from grinding the crossaugher flighting square, so the front edge was not rounded back.  That sharp front edge lets it "cut into" and grab the bean stems, once it grabs them it drags them in and your golden.   I had both the flighting squared, and full finger installed....then squared up flighting did far more to feed the beans than the full finger.

Actually, jass....somebody did ask if the combine had high hours (low power)....

 

crop conditions dictate how a header will feed a 25 ft header in 60 bushel beans is plenty for that combine to handle as well lots of questions to be asked is this combine new to the fella running it pics would help alot I've seen people trying to cut beans way to green lets seen some field conditions pics

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Guys - thank you so much for your thoughts so far!  Happy to hear from people that are willing to help - THANK YOU!

- We plant all of our beans in 15" rows.

- Beans / stems are generally dry.  There has been a green patch here and there we go through, but very uncommon.  I figure the slow speeds and the combine growling is to be expected with the green stems.  But not the dry stems.

- Rotor RPM - We set the rotor in low gear and run at 560 - 600 rpm (I'll have to check the book for the recommended setting then I'll have a better number)

- Last year beans were short, they did feed a little uneven.  Although, generally the head usually does a pretty good job.  Maybe first day or two is rough until we shine the trough up, but then they even out and feed pretty good.  Also, if I run into problems with uneven feeding I found cutting on an angle helps quite a bit as well.

- As far as the concave, chopper, fan speed - I'll have to look at my notes tonight and get back to you guys.

- I'm in northern Ohio.  Beans are a quite a bit out at the moment.  Trying to do some research before harvest begins, so I can't send pics of field conditions.  Although, if I keep running into the problem, I will gladly attach pictures later on when we start. 

 

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3 minutes ago, SleepyKnoll said:

Guys - thank you so much for your thoughts so far!  Happy to hear from people that are willing to help - THANK YOU!

- We plant all of our beans in 15" rows.

- Beans / stems are generally dry.  There has been a green patch here and there we go through, but very uncommon.  I figure the slow speeds and the combine growling is to be expected with the green stems.  But not the dry stems.

- Rotor RPM - We set the rotor in low gear and run at 560 - 600 rpm (I'll have to check the book for the recommended setting then I'll have a better number)

- Last year beans were short, they did feed a little uneven.  Although, generally the head usually does a pretty good job.  Maybe first day or two is rough until we shine the trough up, but then they even out and feed pretty good.  Also, if I run into problems with uneven feeding I found cutting on an angle helps quite a bit as well.

- As far as the concave, chopper, fan speed - I'll have to look at my notes tonight and get back to you guys.

- I'm in northern Ohio.  Beans are a quite a bit out at the moment.  Trying to do some research before harvest begins, so I can't send pics of field conditions.  Although, if I keep running into the problem, I will gladly attach pictures later on when we start. 

 

Sounds like your about right on rotor rpm's when first staring out on beans is always a test , Dry conditions always help too and angle cutting helps feeding so you have the right ideas good luck have a great harvest 

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You’ll want vanes in at least medium speed if not in fast setting, I’d run the rotor at 750 and drop if you start splitting them, concave opening around 4 fan at 1100. I had a 2366 that would occasionally for no reason just drop in rpms doing corn and I ended up listening to Dirt boyz and increased horsepower and eliminated the wastegate line on turbo and seemed to help.

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I am going to suggest you research the horsepower your 8.3 is making.  Are the fuel and air filters recently changed?  The 2366 only has a little tiny juice can size filter and I have had them plug in mid season.  Jass1660’s suggestion to check the wastegate actuator is a good one.  The diaphragm in the 8.3 in one of my tractors failed causing the anaeroid on the fuel injector pump to limit the fuel flow, cutting the power waaaay back.  No power and no smoke either.  I have run a 2366 over 10 years now and that combine should walk through 60 bu. Beans at 3 to 4 mph easy in my opinion.  Good luck.

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I have run 80 series since 1987 and have always run high range, never had a specialty rotor, 3 standards and 1 AFX.  Don't recall what the low end RPM of high range is but 700 is about my minimum and in tough beans and stems I wind it up till I see cracking then back off till good. Don't know what that would translate to in feet / minute on the smaller rotor but seems like 800rpm for starters

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27 minutes ago, Torque said:

Check to make sure the transport vanes in the cage are good. If they are wiped out it will act like that, BTDT.

 2144 here, 30' 1020, 50bu beans @ 5 mph, 70 bu @ 3.5 mph.

+1. 

As Axial-Flows kept going up in HP, the higher tendency they had to either fold over vanes, or rip the bolts that held them into the cage right out of the cage. Then what would happen is what I call a "constipated" combine...meaning the crop does not go through the cage/rotor area in a smooth fashion. Instead, the crop has a tendency to wrap around the rotor in the area with the vane damage. I've seen combines that will actually get a "burn ring" around the cage in the area of vane damage because the crop just wants to stay in the cage, because of the lack of a good vane to move it on through the cage.

Think of the rotor and cage moving the crop through the combine just like screwing a bolt through a nut. A damaged vane will act just like a bad thread in the nut or bolt...causing the nut/bolt to quit turning smoothly on the threads.

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1 hour ago, Torque said:

Check to make sure the transport vanes in the cage are good. If they are wiped out it will act like that, BTDT.

 

33 minutes ago, SDman said:

+1.

X2 or 3... however many times mentioned.  Sounds like the material is not feeding through. Check all the vanes in the cage. Vanes in the cone affect feeding also.  Seen lots of those worn flat too. 

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4 hours ago, jass1660 said:

May want to check wear on rasp bars. Guy I work for has a 9550 deere, 1.5 max in beans. New rasp bars and will go 4 mph now with 30’ platform. 

I guarantee a 9550 with a '30 header here won't cut 4 mph in beans I have a 9650 with a '30 and best I can do after everything is shined up is 3 maybe 3.5 mph Cylinder Deere machines just won't take alot of material  all the 9550's around here all have 25's 

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33 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

I guarantee a 9550 with a '30 header here won't cut 4 mph in beans I have a 9650 with a '30 and best I can do after everything is shined up is 3 maybe 3.5 mph Cylinder Deere machines just won't take alot of material  all the 9550's around here all have 25's 

The lovely weather we’ve had the last three years we haven’t had beans over 40 bpa. 

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17 hours ago, jass1660 said:

You’ll want vanes in at least medium speed if not in fast setting, I’d run the rotor at 750 and drop if you start splitting them, concave opening around 4 fan at 1100. I had a 2366 that would occasionally for no reason just drop in rpms doing corn and I ended up listening to Dirt boyz and increased horsepower and eliminated the wastegate line on turbo and seemed to help.

Its interesting you mention an RPM drop in corn.  In corn, our combine eats it up and chugs along really well!  If I can get this machine to run in soybeans the way it does in corn, we will really have something!

I'll check the vanes and rasp bars tonight.  This rotor was brand new with all new components and vanes a few years back.  Honestly, that is something that we haven't really kept a good eye on (pretty ashamed of myself to say that).  Also want to check on where we have the vanes bolted in at.  There could be a chance that we have them bolted in the wrong position.

Fuel / Air filters were both changed in the beginning of last years harvest as well.

On another note :  I can't believe how many responses I have gotten.  This is the first post I have ever created (long time reader / first time poster) because I figured I wouldn't get much attention, but wow.  Thank you all so much!

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It takes a good 9/16” wrench and a half hour you can move vanes position. I’ve had all three rotor variations thru 3-1460’s, 2-1660’s and a 2366 so learned quite a bit but by no means an expert. Don’t be afraid to ask Most of us are willing to help if we can. 

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The last 2366 that I checked for a low power complaint had a plugged fuel tank vent. We put the vented fuel cap from his 1066 on the combine so that he could finish the morning field before going back to his shop to blow the vent clean with compressed air. The tanks have also been known to plug the outlet port.

    ....not to say it isn't a feeding/threshing problem, but it's an easy check to do. If you take the cap off and hear air rush in, the vent is plugged.

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I have no idea if this applies.....but the last year I ran my 7720, it kept bogging down...just no power.  Just like you, wondered about thresher problems, crop conditions, etc.   Cleaned screens, changed filters, new lift pump, no difference....finally got so bad it barely would run.   Thought it must have major problems.  Pulled off the bowl/screen one more time....and noticed that when I turned the fuel petcock back open to fill the bowl, it was real slow.   Used air to blow back into the tank...and it ran great... for 5 minutes.   So I pulled it back up to the shop, pumped out the entire tank (just filled of course) and pulled the entire bowl/strainer/etc fitting out of the bottom of the tank.   Lo & behold, there is a 2' high plastic "pre-strainer" built into that outlet fitting.  The pre-strainer was NOT plugged.....but inside it there was a ball of corn silks that had somehow weaseled thru the strainer and then formed a "ball of snakes" that was blocking off the small hole into the bowl!   Blow back in, air shoved it up into the prestrainer, fuel would run great....until the ball worked back down and plugged it again.  Pulled the strainer off, dumped out the silk ball, and reassembled.  Cheap fix at least!!   

So maybe....find a spot to check if fuel is running out of the tank freely?  

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If you say it works good in corn would make me think more about the condition of the vanes. You can have pretty bad vanes and it will still work in corn. With a vane or two gone in soybeans, you will usually end up with roping around the rotor where the vanes are missing/damaged.

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Good Morning All,

Just like SDman said, in my head, I'm thinking its the vanes.  I am going to check them tonight.  Meant to last night, but lost track of time - I'm currently re-working and getting the feeder house back to new.  I think this problem is due to poor quality vanes and/or vanes not set aggressive enough.  Will let everyone know tomorrow am.

Thank you everyone!

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