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Milk Can , Showcasing


560Dennis
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I have an old milk can , I thought I would show it off ! What do you think , like it ? 
What Milk can You tell me about it ? I don’t know who made it ? Or if it was plated with nickel or  something else. 
I think it cool here on the deck. 
What is that about 5 Gallon ?  So 45 +pounds full 

Long time ago 
Friend of ours had a run would pick them up in morning before work ,then work a full shift in tool room . Always remember this little man had tremendous arms from lifting them . Not an ounce of of fat on Ernie! 
 

got any story’s about milk cans to share ? Or showcasing your collections . 
 

Wife want to paint it again. She mention it ,I was think have it plated (expensive) ?

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Hawkron said:

I have one from the farm in storage now.. I think they were zinc plated?

 

Took photo of inside inside lid does look like Zinc 

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We had one that was in awesome shape 30 years ago. I don't remember if it sold at our sale or what happened to it. We always used a few to haul drinking water to the fair for our animals as the water was way different at the fairgrounds

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My Dad used milk cans in the 1950's. Finally got a bulk tank sometime in the 1960's. I remember every so often the milk processing plant would send back a bright and shiny new can. I remember Dad telling me that they re-plated them every so often.

I used an old milk can at the 2013 Roundup in Lima and again at another show.

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I’ve got a dozen. Use to be my Great Grandfathers.  I think I remember Grampa saying they had 100, drop off 50 full, pick up 50 empty.  I have waste oil in one right now. And another that we use about yearly for Ford 5000/6600 clutch split jobs.  The can is a exclusive safety feature, it’s just the right height to slide under the bellhousing as a backup support. 

Given.....now I want to put a metal seat on one. 

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On this farm they were cream cans. We milked cows (by hand) , then cranked the milk through the IH 2S cream separator. Fed the skim milk to the calves, pigs, etc. and sold the cream in those same cans for years. In early years the Keliher creamery sent out a cream truck to pick up the cans but after that burned down we hauled our own to town in the trunk of the old 52 Merc. We had several we kept separate used just to haul drinking water from a neighbour's well. I have lifted a lot of those over the years. I've got some saved away. Maybe I'll have to get one out on display like some of you guys have. 

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27 minutes ago, Nebraska Cowman said:

Not zinc. Tin.

Thank you 

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I've got a nice one that came from the family farm. I remember when they had to go to bulk in the mid '60s. It started to rust so I painted it. Farm down the street has their mailbox in one so they can move it away from the plows in winter (IH Red with black stripe). I moved my box just behind the utility pole so they have to take that out before they get my mail box. Hasn't stopped the trash truck, though as he turns in my drive.

Sorry, can't find a picture of the can but here's what the trash truck did to a granite post. Claimed he didn't feel it!?

Trash truck driver is a red guy so maybe intentional? ? I've got both colors so used the only full can I had to paint.

Mailbox photos.jpg

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I've got a couple, one still with the big hand painted red letter/numbers code of the farm from which it came.

Our place was on an intersection of 2 gravel roads.  This was before stop signs were invented.

I don't recall the exact year but I was about 7 - 9.  Was a hard winter that year and the snow banks were high.  One blustery Feb day the snow plow and milk truck ended up in the middle of that intersection at the same time.  The V-plow split the truck open behind the cab.  Knocked the milk hauler over and spun the snow plow around.  No one was seriously injured but 40 or more full cans were strewn all over the road.

When things warmed up that spring it took a number of hard rains to wash away the spillage and smell of all that spoiled milk.

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https://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/story/34034/20170714/early-milk-transportation-dairy-plants-from-the-1800s-to-the-1930s

This was an interesting article but factually incorrect as it said the cans were aluminum.I believe aluminum  would leave an off taste in the milk thus leaving the milk unusable. As I write this, the one gallon containers we had for house milk were aluminum and I don’t remember an off taste from them. My sister uses aluminum or tin cups for drinking from and they leave a taste in my mouth.

I believe they were 5 gallons or bigger. My uncle use to talk about how many pounds they held, not gallons, as milk was sold by the pound. Another article I read said 86 pounds but idk.

Everyone had a farm number and processing number on the can and lid. The milk(some of it here)would get picked up by a truck and delivered to the plant where they’d sample/test it for quality and then process it. The cans would be placed bottom up on a conveyor to be washed (idk how the lids were washed) and then they would be taken back to the farm. 
I think some cans were loaded onto milk trains headed for Boston from here. Most if not all milk plants were on rail lines. 
My uncle would talk about “Joe Whatever” who could swing a full milk can onto the truck one handed, carrying a can in each hand! Different times for sure.

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IIRC the cream cans were 5 gallons around here.  Know for sure milk cans were 10 gal.  At 8.6 #/gal, and guessing 15# for the can it gets close to 100# filled. The milkman would lift the cans out of the cooler, swing them 4’ up into a truck box, then to climb into the box to put the cans on a rack.  Do not remember if the he did it one handed.  Dad’s producer number 14-6 was painted on each can and lid.  A bulk tank and pipeline milker was installed about 1961 and then the milkman’s belt began to get too short.

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