Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 91
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

All this power for 3 steers, 

Wait.....there is an End to Haying!?!??   These are second cutting  this week. after tomorrow, only 100 acres left of second. Then it looks like there will be a third cutt

Well if I don't get stupid and try to go cut around some water holes in the horse pasture, I am done mowing! Bout darn time too. Had some to put up before I ventured into the duck pond.  Fell asl

Posted Images

3 hours ago, stronger800 said:

Can somebody post a link to a video on that unstable floating soil? I can't find it 

I may not be able to help you. 

Because of the uniqueness and small area it encompasses, it may be the only place in the world with this specific soil type/condition, it has not been studied much.

I did a google search on wet hay meadow fens and didn't really come up with anything of any help. 

My information comes from haying it, talking to other people who have hayed it and it's mention in local history books about Cherry Co. 

Someone, I think UNL might have studied it to some extent, Maybe Gudmundsen Sandhills Lab (a ranch by Whitman NE donated to UNL to be used for research on the Sandhills) but I can't find the information I want there either. 

Maybe I just don't know how to look. 

I will keep looking, maybe someone else (Nick???) will chime in with some information. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, stronger800 said:

Can somebody post a link to a video on that unstable floating soil? I can't find it 

What you guys are describing sounds a lot like how muck ground behaves. From what I've been told its definitely a unique experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m getting real close. I got 1/4 of 3rd put up this last week and I’ve got 40 acres left to go that I was too chicken to cut down with the impending weather. In hindsight I would have had time enough to get it put up had I cut it. So it goes. 
 

 

3A3362CA-F3B2-4E2C-839A-832B081279F7.jpeg

EDF4EB60-3A97-464D-B373-F72B9A65ED23.jpeg

08CB69CC-3D43-45C3-9F9C-7484C9CEE29A.jpeg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, sandhiller said:

I may not be able to help you. 

Because of the uniqueness and small area it encompasses, it may be the only place in the world with this specific soil type/condition, it has not been studied much.

I did a google search on wet hay meadow fens and didn't really come up with anything of any help. 

My information comes from haying it, talking to other people who have hayed it and it's mention in local history books about Cherry Co. 

Someone, I think UNL might have studied it to some extent, Maybe Gudmundsen Sandhills Lab (a ranch by Whitman NE donated to UNL to be used for research on the Sandhills) but I can't find the information I want there either. 

Maybe I just don't know how to look. 

I will keep looking, maybe someone else (Nick???) will chime in with some information. 

 

Maybe the same but not. 😉 The Sacramento River islands and delta. Parts are organic muck,would not support wheels. The reason Benjamin Holt put crawler tracks on a steam engine in 1904. 👍 He went on to help found Caterpillar. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

ZG6E, how many days does it take for your hay to dry, just staying in the swath like that? Sure has great color. A guy couldn’t do that here in NY. The bottom would mold before it would ever dry out.  Looking at your grass regrowth, I’m guessing you cut one day, and bale it 2 days later. We do that too, but we wear out tedders and rakes moving it 4,5,6,7x before we can bale it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

ZG6E, how many days does it take for your hay to dry, just staying in the swath like that? Sure has great color. A guy couldn’t do that here in NY. The bottom would mold before it would ever dry out.  Looking at your grass regrowth, I’m guessing you cut one day, and bale it 2 days later. We do that too, but we wear out tedders and rakes moving it 4,5,6,7x before we can bale it. 

It’s all dependent on the weather. I caught a hot dry spell and that was cut, set in the field 3 days and was ready to go that night. It took me a couple days to get it put up though with the short baling windows. If I had to move my hay that often I’m afraid I wouldn’t have many leaves left on the alfalfa. 
 

On first cutting I lay the windrows out a lot wider and it still isn’t uncommon for the hay to have to sit 5-6 days before it’s ready to go. It can be tough to get first put up here without rain on it. I don’t sweat it too much since I keep all my first and some of my 2nd to feed myself. The majority of my 3rd gets sold though so I really like to get it put up right. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

We don’t have much alfalfa anymore. Years ago we did, would try to always ted it early in the morning with dew still on it to save the leaves.  5-6 day stretches of good weather are not as common as they use to be. That’s why we ted and rake so much. Get it dry as quickly as possible. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ray54 said:

Maybe the same but not. 😉 The Sacramento River islands and delta. Parts are organic muck,would not support wheels. The reason Benjamin Holt put crawler tracks on a steam engine in 1904. 👍 He went on to help found Caterpillar. 

 

It is not muck I don't think. But good tight sod.

It is like laying down sod on a lake instead of ground.

Sod maybe one to three feet thick.

It really is unique, wish I could find someone with better talents than me for explaining it. There has got to be an article somewhere.

Maybe kind of like "Ice Road Truckers" where they have to drive slow to keep the ice from creating a wave in front of them.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

We are about done, but may cut a little third in a couple weeks.  We had these out for a tractor pull, and thought we would bale a little "old school."

Fun, but I still prefer to bale with the 706.  That's still pretty much "old school" I guess.

20200907_140230.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/8/2020 at 12:14 AM, sandhiller said:

 

It is not muck I don't think. But good tight sod.

It is like laying down sod on a lake instead of ground.

Sod maybe one to three feet thick.

It really is unique, wish I could find someone with better talents than me for explaining it. There has got to be an article somewhere.

Maybe kind of like "Ice Road Truckers" where they have to drive slow to keep the ice from creating a wave in front of them.

 

 

 

We have some pasture along a lake very similar to what you are describing  except I would never drive on it. Just driving with the quad you can see the whole ground move and walking on it feels so weird. I would say it is only about a foot thick layer of sod on top of water. When it dries out you could probably run a tractor on it but that would be very rare. I have put the skid stee throug the ice when we were logging in the bush there. Never dropped through the sod but also cant see the water holes when its covered in snow. If what you are cutting hay in is simialoar to that, that would be quite the experience. Around here our sloughs are all hard bottom, just sometime 2 feet of wet ground on top 😂

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cutting down the last 40 as I type this. Hoping for good drying weather but to be honest I feel overdue for getting some nice alfalfa rained on so we will see how it goes. 

C89E1DCA-2A37-460D-8918-C1F85F298536.jpeg

91FEC11E-6FA7-4D22-A6A5-BBCAA50547D4.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, ZG6E said:

Cutting down the last 40 as I type this. Hoping for good drying weather but to be honest I feel overdue for getting some nice alfalfa rained on so we will see how it goes. 

C89E1DCA-2A37-460D-8918-C1F85F298536.jpeg

91FEC11E-6FA7-4D22-A6A5-BBCAA50547D4.jpeg

That's some good looking hay right there. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Those two outfits are owned separately by two friends who are in their low 20s. They don't usually bale together, as each have their own business. Last weekend they were baling together pretty much wrapping things up for the year. That's my old 1486 I owned from 1996-2018. He helps around here now and then, and also bales some hay for me usually using my Hydro 100. I'm pretty proud of those young guys. Both have good work ethics, which is kinda hard to find in today's younger generation 

8890.jpeg

  • Like 5
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...