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Are there any of you peanut farmers? What kind of a planter do you use and do you plant the whole peanut or is it shelled? Could you use the peanuts that are sold as in the shell bird, squirrel food? They are raw I believe.

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I tired some Virgina Jumbos in my garden several years ago. It was a cold wet spring and they rotted before they came up. They were big seeds if I remember. If I had time and space I would try them again but plant them in ridges. That might help the wet part of it. Seems like they needed 120 days to mature.

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You can get those plates for just about any brand planter. You plant them in the spring and harvest them in the fall. You dig them with a inverter which put them in a windrow, with the nuts up. Let them dry for about three days in the field, and then run the combine and dump them in air drying wagon.

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I had some pictures posted of my friend digging peanuts and harvesting peanuts. Search peanuts and it should come up.

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I don't plan on raising a crop but, would like to plant a few just to see how they would turn out. How deep are they planted? In our area we would not get 120 days frost free so I would start them in the green house in pots. Like I say, just a few plants to try out.

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A friend of mine has a son-in-law that grows peanuts here in west Texas. He sent me some pics from last year's peanut harvest. First pic is a peanut digger. Digs them up and turns the plant over so the peanuts can dry.  Second pic is a peanut combine. Built by Amadas on a JD combine chassis and running gear. Third pic is a shaker-dryer loading a truck. And just to make it "legal" here, another shaker-dryer being moved by a Red tractor.

peanut digger-maple, texas.jpg

peanut harvest- maple, texas.jpg

peanut harvest-shaker.jpg

peanut harvest-shaker-1.jpg

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Peanut plants are a vine. You would need to get it out of the pot before the vine started running. The vine puts down roots all along the length.

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I heard that you have to a license or permit or something like that to grow peanuts is that true ?

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In the past there was a quota system for government support. You can plant all you want but the support system has to be bought into or grown over years.

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When I was a little kid,  dad had a peanut allotment that came with a place he bought. Somehow he traded it for a rice allotment. We never grew peanuts but I remember some about how they did it, small scale.

Plant peanuts on  well drained sandy ground. It's difficult to get the clay off peanuts but dry sand falls off. Prepare the ground normally and plant them similar to soybeans. Control weeds, etc. At harvest time they turned them with a turning plow, putting them on top of the ground. They gathered the vines and wrapped them around poles to dry. Then they were thrashed, separated and cleaned.

Now its more automated in large scale but I have known people who used this method and it still works.

Cottage is similar to growing soybeans except there is alot more scouting and management. Obviously you pick cotton with a cotton picker or by hand. 

Thx-Ace 

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I know a guy that grew some in his garden about 50 miles south of Valentine Nebraska. If I remember correctly, he ended up with about 40 pounds of peanut. 

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I've been to Duluth many times, all seasons. I'm not sure peanuts will survive if you get a wind off lake superior. It won't hurt to try though. Thx-Ace 

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I like trying different things in the gardens. Many times you see that they are for some other zones but a lot of times they'll do just fine if you provide what they need. I've planted some seeds that were for high up in the Andes mts. and they grow well, also some very tender plants that must be protected from winter cold " Myier lemons " that we take in the house for winter. A lot of house plants can go outside for the Summer just have to debug them before you bring them back in. Most plants like the longer days we have here so they grow well.

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