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My building restoration project in a single thread.......


dads706
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I'll do my best to explain.But first I have to apologize for no before pictures, i don't know what happened, and I wish you could see them just to see the transformation just jacking the building 6 inches made.

The wife's grandfather told us many times about the farm dances they had in this building. It is a horse drawn machinery shed. It only has 7' walls, Sometime in it's history it was used partially as a granary because there is a hole in the roof for an elevator, and on the far end there is a small door that would have been used to shovel grain into. The cracked and falling apart concrete had a day of 1921 and either her great grandfathers initials or her great great grandfathers initials (they had the same first name so the initials would have been the same). We are assuming her great grandfather.  We are going to cut that signature out and embed it in the new concrete floor.

This building had an old work bench with a post vise in the corner along with some nailed together used boards to make drawers along with a nailed together bolt?? bin and some used boards nailed between a couple studs to act as shelves of sorts. All of these I saved and will do my best to duplicate that corner work area as a legacy to the family members who built them.

I intend to make it into a wood shop. I currently have equipment scattered among 3 buildings. Planer/bandsaw/etc in one building, 2 tables saws in another and finally the 'wood shop' for assembly. Areal pain having to go from building to building to building to work on a project.

Except for the concrete work, I'm doing 99.9% of this myself so it may be this time next year before it is finished.

The building as it looked yesterday. Was hoping to go another foot higher so I would have a full 10' inside, but things were getting a bit wobbly. May still try it, just don't want it to fall and lose the entire building.IMG_0934.thumb.jpg.54c7c6b9ff5a3be0a67a1c6257511947.jpg

Using 4 - 50 ton jacks to lift it (extreme overkill) 20 years ago I bought a couple 15" by 34' I-beams for $200 for the pair.  Was planning on building a couple bale trailers. I'm glad I didn't because this was the perfect use for them.

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The studs were still somewhat attached to the sill. If you can visualize from where the foundation is rolled to you can get an idea of how far the walls were out of plumb. The second was not only out of plumb by 2', it also had a sway in the center by a foot or so. But those beams straighten the plates, and the walls plumbed themselves. ( I was hoping they would)IMG_0930.thumb.jpg.1bf839b4563ceaa4d878267b47bb4c29.jpgIMG_0897.thumb.JPG.3a0daba0fcb91729a6afde82c2105323.JPG

The man himself pulling on a wall to see how easy it would be to bring it back into plumb. For as spread as the walls were, the building is was not racked. I was quite surprised.

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Today we poured footings.

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There was no way to get under the building and dig a 4 foot deep footing all the way around the building so we improvised. We took his bobcat slightly angled the auger and dug a 16" hole 4' deep every 2 feet. We dug out a foot or so between holes and poured everything full. rebared the holes, tied the holes to the horizontal with rebar, double rebared the horizontal, and used fiber in the concrete besides. So while not the conventional method we should be good. 

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Hopefully if all goes well, I'll start sistering all the studs next week and lower it down on it's new foundation.

Now that I know how simple it is to post photos, I'll keep posting the progress if anyone is interested. 

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After the walls rolled out, the 4x6 sill rotted away, you just can't see it in the pic's. But surprisingly only the studs in about a 20' section were rotted through, but most had rot of some degree.  

One thing I did notice was that the east wall must have rolled out some time ago because the bolt bin I referred to was built plumb, not parallel to the studs. Meaning that the bottom was 4 inches further out than the top. And that would have had to have been built by the wife's grandfather or before.

The stories this building could tell.......

Oh, the building will be modernized. I will add an overhead door on the end and put metal on the outside. But the heart of it will remain 120+ years old not a board will be removed that doesn't need to be. Hopefully my grandkids kids will be able to look at the floor in 2120 and still see both the 1921 and 2020 date in the concrete and wonder about the stories. 

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Right now I'm at about 9' 3 or 4" floor to joist clearance. I'd like to get 10' clearance and may try it, but doubtful. Things were starting to get a bit wobbly. 

And saving family history is a lot more important to me than a couple more inches of headroom.

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Today's photos.  Jacked the building up another 6 inches from where it was in the previous pictures. That will give me 10' of clearance when we get the floor in. Most of the studs are in. The side door opening will be studded, but for now we can get the cement chute in.  The end has been cut out. Cribbibg is down and I-beams are out. Cement guy comes tomorrow to form up the 20x20 pad on the end, there will also be a small pad for the walk-in door. (not framed yet) and he is going to shoot the floor and get it ready. Cement pour Monday.

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Couple inside shots.

Gonna try to get the sheeting up this weekend to steady things up. I'm not ready to take any bracing down just yet. The 120 year old siding and the nails holding it are somewhat loose and wouldn't really keep things solid. I sistered 2x6's to the old 2x4 studs for support as well as room for a bit more insulation. Used a 4x6 for a sill plate. I want this to be here 120 years from now. Going to put a treated 1x12 along the bottom on the outside, and then I'll brake some coil stock to lap up the side and over the edge of the cement to keep moisture out. 

If you look at the right side of the second picture you will see the bolt bin I'm going to remove and then put back up after the inside is sheeted. If you look at it you will get an idea of how far that wall was pushed out of plumb. (and that was all in 7' height.) You can also see the boards that were scabbed between the studs to act as shelves. I plan to restore this corner to as close as it was so that if the wife's grandfather or great grandfather stepped into the shed their work bench area will be just as they left it. Along with the same junk that was in the bins. (minus the mouse turds)

 

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Not a really good photo, but the center 10' between the uprights will be storage. Or as the wife says, just another place to hoard stuff. I have to remove some of the 'extra' boards and it would be easier to visualize. The sides will be 4'6" with enough height to walk around easily. It will be lighted and have outlets also, but will probably be the last thing to do.

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My 70 year ol'body is getting sore. But it is a fun kind of sore. (just buy aspirin in bulk) Next week will be finishing the studs, framing the door, soffits, and windows (I'm building the windows also) and then hopefully get the outside ready for tin. I'd like to get it buttoned up before the snow flies. Then I'll be able to roll around on the scaffolding.   Plus I have some winter building projects I've committed to. So if I at least get it closed in, I can shift gears and projects.

I haven't quite got this retirement thing figured out yet......I was planning on putting my feet up and napping. (maybe next year)

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......great project.......and being ''in the family''   ....very special ,........

....I noticed    how your "sistered "     6x2     studs  were put  in...We are ''doing up '    an old 1906   built house.....or villa    as the old more ornate   buildings were called.......We did the same thing   using 4x2    Doug Fir studs.........The original   timbers were , in the main....very sound.....New Zealand has some very nice  "native " tree species....some of which are very durable.....but some of the sap wood  was getting  a bit like swiss cheese..........

The interior   walls   have    "saking "    on them ...(sp?)......8''x1''......we are using standard "gib board " ...now metric....dimension.....and therefore   the 12 foot stud rooms have to be "dwanged "  to suit all this.....

Your project    is very interesting...please  keep the odd picture coming.....:)

Mike

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If I understand you correctly, you plan to have coil stock in contact with the treated lumber. You may want to reconsider since the treatment will eat aluminum. There are probably differences in the type of treatment that is used on the wood but I covered some with aluminum coil and it ate right through in a couple of years. 

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Strong ️Got that I beam up there all by yourself ? 

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i like it A LOT............you are doing an amazing job - that is one thing i didnt get talent in - carpentry, i just scab and try..........never comes out like i planned i cant think ahead of the measurements - i forget to allow for x and y and then i get frustrated 

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no progress today. To many errands.

Mike....... For my cabinet face frames I've been using "New Zealand Pine". I use it for anything that will be painted. It seems to work up easily. I have a couple boards 5/4 X 6 that I plan on resawing and will use it for drawer fronts to see how it works. 

12-guy..... good point. The 'old' stuff was nasty and probably toxic  but would last forever. I have been wrapping 4x4 and 6x6 for years with no side effects. The "new" stuff won't eat screws and nails like the old did. I could always put some felt paper behind the coil stock just for insurance. Since there will be felt paper on the outside under the tin. Sorry, I'm old school. I still like felt paper.

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2 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

i like it A LOT............you are doing an amazing job - that is one thing i didnt get talent in - carpentry, i just scab and try..........never comes out like i planned i cant think ahead of the measurements - i forget to allow for x and y and then i get frustrated 

Like my brother the carpenter likes to say, “I cut it twice and it’s still too short!”

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4 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

i like it A LOT............you are doing an amazing job - that is one thing i didnt get talent in - carpentry, i just scab and try..........never comes out like i planned i cant think ahead of the measurements - i forget to allow for x and y and then i get frustrated 

 

1 hour ago, ihrondiesel said:

Like my brother the carpenter likes to say, “I cut it twice and it’s still too short!”

That the story of my wood butchering as well.

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12-guy..... good point. The 'old' stuff was nasty and probably toxic  but would last forever. I have been wrapping 4x4 and 6x6for years with no side effects. The "new" stuff won't eat screws and nails like the old did. I could always put some felt paperbehind the coil stock just for insurance. Since there will be felt paper on the outside under the tin. Sorry, I'm old school. I stilllike felt paper.

 

If it were me, I would brown cedar instead if treated. You can still wrap with aluminum and felt paper

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Impressive project and a good-looking outcome.

All looks plumb and level.  Acheiving that must have been challenging.

Thank you for taking the time to post the photos and narrative.

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This fall I am cutting some hardwood and do some projects. Nice work. I move my house in on steel, cut it in half and hall it home and put it back together. It is a 40x40.

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Treated wood will eat right thru your aluminum coil. Would hate to see that happen to you after all the work you’ve done on it. Awesome progress so far and you are doing a great job. You must feel pretty proud to be able to revive an old building. Keep up the good work! 

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