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Hey guys, I’m looking to get into no tilling beans and cover crops more. The neighbor has a Krause no till drill and is super pleased with it, and just from looking at them they’re definitely really heavy.  
 

Anyone have one? How’s maintenance and repairs on them, any known weak spots? 
 

ive seen 5200NT and 5250NT drills locally. Any difference between the two or one better than the other?

Would a 1486 pull a fifteen footer around on my hills? Pic for reference.... we’ve got hills

F2D4A1BD-3182-4AE7-966A-DEBB1925F0F9.jpeg

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12 minutes ago, Dasnake said:

This can’t help cuz I know nothing, but what a great pic. Where ru?

Palmerton PA. 30 minutes north of Allentown pa. View through the gap is of the Lehigh Valley about a month ago

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In all reality they don’t pull real hard. I would think your 14 would pull it without any issues. If traction is an issue then put duals on it. 

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I have no experience with the krause but we are in the mountains in NC and our ground is very similar to yours, maybe a little steeper and I have pulled a 7 foot great plains no till drill with a caseih 885 (72 pto hp) with no trouble. Then a hay buster 10 foot no till drill with a kubota 125x. You should be fine with a 1486 on a 15 footer. 

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I have no experience with a krause but I have been around a landfoll drill. Those drills are heavy, like 20,000 pounds loaded, this one was a 30 foot. We usually drilled with a magnum 225 cvt, it pulled it ok. The mx270 pulled it the best. The jd 4650 could do it on flat ground but forget about it if there were hills. I didn't really notice the tractor pulling any harder when I lowered the openers into the ground.

I would think a 1486 would be able to pull a fifteen foot. Are you looking for a mounted drill or is it a pull behind. Pull behind drills can have a negative tongue weight effect when the openers are raised, at least the landoll did. That can make difficult head lands a challenge. Having enough weight on the rear axle would make a big difference

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12 hours ago, 88power said:

Still is,as for pulling a 15 you better run duals an a lot of weight on the front and that's with the ground dry

I have been renting an Esch 12 ft drill that turns sideways for transport like a corn planter.  This has 5.5 inch spacing so I am not sure how many discs etc are in the ground vs what you are looking at.  My 5250 with fluid in the rear would not pull it up a pretty good hill without the fwa engaged.  This is one of those hills you can't dump a round Bale out on without it rolling away.  Im guessing if you are on contours or level ground you will be ok but not going back and forth up and down a hill planting.  Just my little experience.

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Why you hung up on a Krause?  For what you can buy a late 750 Deere for, and the huge aftermarket support for them, let alone the factory parts backing, that is what I would go with.  15ft with 2pt hitch........possibly drawbar, but do not buy one with dolly wheels!

 

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54 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

Why you hung up on a Krause?  For what you can buy a late 750 Deere for, and the huge aftermarket support for them, let alone the factory parts backing, that is what I would go with.  15ft with 2pt hitch........possibly drawbar, but do not buy one with dolly wheels!

 

Why not a dolly?

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You can put two point style pull on with dolly wheels. We had one of each and you could raise three point to get dollies off ground if need be. 

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2 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

Why you hung up on a Krause?  For what you can buy a late 750 Deere for, and the huge aftermarket support for them, let alone the factory parts backing, that is what I would go with.  15ft with 2pt hitch........possibly drawbar, but do not buy one with dolly wheels!

 

I don’t have any particular reason to like the Krause aside from them being common around here and looking plenty heavy.  I always was onder the impression Deere’s we’re both expensive to buy and expensive to maintain with a ton of moving parts on the openers. The Krause just replace 2 discs and hit the road

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If you have similar terain to what we have I would definitely never try and pull a 15 ft no-till drill on a 1486 without 10 bolt hubs and duals

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22 minutes ago, Bdse25 said:

I don’t have any particular reason to like the Krause aside from them being common around here and looking plenty heavy.  I always was onder the impression Deere’s we’re both expensive to buy and expensive to maintain with a ton of moving parts on the openers. The Krause just replace 2 discs and hit the road

i have used great plains and tye 7 foots. 10 foots deere 1590 and the khun krause. the deere is a far better machine that any of the others but ill narrow it down to the 5200 and it. Yes the deere we paid more for it new the kuhn but the deere is going to run far longer before any trouble the kuhn we didn't make it a acre and a half and the wheel bearing went out on one of the transports went another 2 acres and the other went out.in one fall ever bearing went out of the no till disc plus the no till disc turn and if they are not set just right they will knock off or cut the dust cap off the one next to it we even had one cut the hub and spindle all that had to be replaced. A heavy dew will clog the seed tubes on on up quick the seed tube setup on them is a joke they have the tube that comes from the meter it slides down into a larger tube that runs to the shoe shoe clogs up pushes the top tube off the meter breaking the tabs that hold it on then you need a new meter we took this one  apart and made it where deere tubes will work we did that and it was not even a year old yet. 5200 uses the weight of the machine to press down in the ground the 1590 deere uses hydraulic pressure which on hills makes a big difference especially if its wet. a 5088 singles no wet has a hard time pulling a 5200 up a hill when its wet.

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1 hour ago, Bdse25 said:

I don’t have any particular reason to like the Krause aside from them being common around here and looking plenty heavy.  I always was onder the impression Deere’s we’re both expensive to buy and expensive to maintain with a ton of moving parts on the openers. The Krause just replace 2 discs and hit the road

Never been around a Krause but was told the arm pivots on those wear just like anything else which is a big repair?  

Only thing that makes a Deere expensive is someone who didn't keep after it.  I see later 750's surfing craiglist out west very reasonable, with the trucking they are still cheap, and most out there aren't run into the ground like guys here do.  Even a worn 750 will do a good job.  Yes, in our hills the dolly wheels are not a good idea, zero weight transfer and those drills are heavy.  Even a early one isn't bad, if the pivots were greased, and you also grease it, and those are sure getting cheap as everyone wants a late one.  Put alot of seed in the ground with a early one, did a great job.  

5288drill.JPG.f2c74f667ac00accb305fd03f761a7a6.JPG

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18 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

Never been around a Krause but was told the arm pivots on those wear just like anything else which is a big repair?  

Only thing that makes a Deere expensive is someone who didn't keep after it.  I see later 750's surfing craiglist out west very reasonable, with the trucking they are still cheap, and most out there aren't run into the ground like guys here do.  Even a worn 750 will do a good job.  Yes, in our hills the dolly wheels are not a good idea, zero weight transfer and those drills are heavy.  Even a early one isn't bad, if the pivots were greased, and you also grease it, and those are sure getting cheap as everyone wants a late one.  Put alot of seed in the ground with a early one, did a great job.  

5288drill.JPG.f2c74f667ac00accb305fd03f761a7a6.JPG

So those Deere’s actually no till when they’re a bit worn?  I like the idea of a full row of no till coulters for doing some residue management at the same time

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2 hours ago, Bdse25 said:

So those Deere’s actually no till when they’re a bit worn?  I like the idea of a full row of no till coulters for doing some residue management at the same time

Yes, that one was shot when it came, but it was cheap.  Boots were shot, disks about shot, trench packers and the closer pivots were worn out, etc..............Didn't do a half bad job for what it was in true no-till.  In that shot above, NH3 was knifed in with mole knives(Owner wouldn't allow true tillage so we used the bar as a go by) and a VT tool was ran over it, which is why it looks worked.  Was better of-course after fixing most of it,  but it was supprising how well even a shot one would put the seed into hard ground because of the way they are built.  

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2 hours ago, Bdse25 said:

So those Deere’s actually no till when they’re a bit worn? 

They do when seeding into prepare ground like in the picture.  In ground that is trashy and has lots of cover, hair pinning is an issue. I've seen neighbors lose entire fields to that.  We and others that run JD no-till drills religiously change out the blades every 5,000 acres on 60ft drills.  Its why some guys heavy harrow now after harvest.  Plus people including us pay a lot more attention to maintenance on the straw chopper.  And now seeding at an angle to the previous crop helps alleviate some of the hair pinning too.  I've looked into Aricks row cleaners but the cost of those far exceeds to proper residue management.  

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33 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

They do when seeding into prepare ground like in the picture.  In ground that is trashy and has lots of cover, hair pinning is an issue. I've seen neighbors lose entire fields to that.  We and others that run JD no-till drills religiously change out the blades every 5,000 acres on 60ft drills.  Its why some guys heavy harrow now after harvest.  Plus people including us pay a lot more attention to maintenance on the straw chopper.  And now seeding at an angle to the previous crop helps alleviate some of the hair pinning too.  I've looked into Aricks row cleaners but the cost of those far exceeds to proper residue management.  

As long as the disks are good, and installed with the edge angle right, that isn't as big of an issue as most make it out to be.....................Put on new disks with everything else worn out and do not have hardly any issue in standing 150 bu/acre corn stubble.  From there up with worn boots, it gets a bit iffy..........New boots and good disk, its just drive, works good.  

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1 hour ago, TP from Central PA said:

As long as the disks are good, and installed with the edge angle right, that isn't as big of an issue as most make it out to be.....................Put on new disks with everything else worn out and do not have hardly any issue in standing 150 bu/acre corn stubble.  From there up with worn boots, it gets a bit iffy..........New boots and good disk, its just drive, works good.  

What were they drilling? Beans or wheat or rye ? 

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2 hours ago, bitty said:

What were they drilling? Beans or wheat or rye ? 

Beans in that particular picture if my memory is right............Put in alot more cover with it than anything else.  Beans with the cup meters was a pain when you were used to a corn planter meter, the lower population you plant the worse it is as far as accuracy............Belt meters would fix that, but the neighbors didn't like their belts for any cover.............It worked but not the greatest, so the cup meter, or controlled spill meter as I called it, was the best for all around use.  

Only gripe with a 15ft is it is hard to move on the little roads..................Everyone else who had a notill drill that didn't have a Deere had a Tye here.................Dairy in the next county over is about as anti-green and the heads of CNH, they even got a 1590...............Painted Black and hidden when not being used, so they must not be too bad.

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4 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

As long as the disks are good, and installed with the edge angle right, that isn't as big of an issue as most make it out to be.....................Put on new disks with everything else worn out and do not have hardly any issue in standing 150 bu/acre corn stubble.  From there up with worn boots, it gets a bit iffy..........New boots and good disk, its just drive, works good.  

Earth Metal blades for the JD drill were a good investment when we rebuilt our 750 drill several years ago.  I think they are outlasting the original openers at least 2 to 1.  There are a lot of companies making aftermarket "improvement" parts for these drills too (Kind of like the axial flow combines!)  Good Luck.

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20 minutes ago, axial_al said:

Earth Metal blades for the JD drill were a good investment when we rebuilt our 750 drill several years ago.  I think they are outlasting the original openers at least 2 to 1.  There are a lot of companies making aftermarket "improvement" parts for these drills too (Kind of like the axial flow combines!)  Good Luck.

Yeah, the aftermarket support is nice.............Shoup, CFC, etc all have parts so you don't need mother Deere for very much, if anything.  

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4 hours ago, TP from Central PA said:

Beans in that particular picture if my memory is right............Put in alot more cover with it than anything else.  Beans with the cup meters was a pain when you were used to a corn planter meter, the lower population you plant the worse it is as far as accuracy............Belt meters would fix that, but the neighbors didn't like their belts for any cover.............It worked but not the greatest, so the cup meter, or controlled spill meter as I called it, was the best for all around use.  

Only gripe with a 15ft is it is hard to move on the little roads..................Everyone else who had a notill drill that didn't have a Deere had a Tye here.................Dairy in the next county over is about as anti-green and the heads of CNH, they even got a 1590...............Painted Black and hidden when not being used, so they must not be too bad.

I use to rent out 2 750s back in the 90s and was delivering one to a neighbor and the farm he wanted it at had a gate that you went straight off a 90 degree corner on a gravel road. It was getting dark in the evening and we were approaching the corner when I noticed lights on a car coming toward the corner from the other direction, off the corner I went to beat the oncoming car with all being fine. Went to pick it up a couple days later, took about 3 tries to get it between them gate posts in the daylight and rubbed as well. Guess I should have waited till dark to get it.    :lol:

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