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jeeper61

Old Cable Stuff

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Boy do I miss the summer shows this year so I'd like to see what everyone has for photos of old cable operated stuff.

I saw this one a few years ago at a friend’s place.

I notice Lima was using the "Pay" name too

 

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Lima and Link Belt.jpg

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Worked on a pipeline project in '76.  I was surprised to see that outfit still was using a couple Bucyrus-Erie cable hoes.

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Jeez, if Seth reads this he is going to start rambling about how he likes my UNIT.

 

 

 

 

Here is a picture of me displaying my UNIT at my wedding reception:

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Another brand from a bye gone era what’s it got for power?

BTW you might want to get a sun screen for your Unit it’s looking a little red

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excellent pictures  >.!!!

....I imagine the operator was as old as the Shovel....

Mike

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9 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

Another brand from a bye gone era what’s it got for power?

BTW you might want to get a sun screen for your Unit it’s looking a little red

Power is a 2-71 Detroit.  I would say that the governor is not set for very high speed because it has a pleasant sound to it without screaming.

Red?????  Perhaps orange?  More Specically Persian Orange (Allis-).

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8 hours ago, mike newman said:

excellent pictures  >.!!!

....I imagine the operator was as old as the Shovel....

Mike

 I noticed that he likely ran one when he was a young lad.

There is a video of what looks the same machine digging on you tube.

One operator pulling the levers the other stoking the boiler  

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16 hours ago, 1586 Jeff said:

Power is a 2-71 Detroit.  I would say that the governor is not set for very high speed because it has a pleasant sound to it without screaming.

Red?????  Perhaps orange?  More Specically Persian Orange (Allis-).

That is good that they didn't have to spin the motor to fast to get to the dreaded Detroit Scream Level.

If I leave my unit out in the sun to long it gets red.

If you’re a John Deere man I wonder if your unit turns green  

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This old Bucyrus Erie sits at the entrance to a local stone quarry.

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On 7/25/2020 at 10:05 PM, 7and8and1456 said:

This one is steam powered. I saw it in 2006.  It is at Denton Farmpark in Denton NC, home of Southeast Old Threshers’ Reunion ( https://dentonfarmpark.com/48th-annual-southeast-old-threshers-reunion/  

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Reminds me of the book “Mike Mulligan’s Steam Shovel”. Was a favorite when I was 7 or 8....

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8 hours ago, NY1468 said:

Reminds me of the book “Mike Mulligan’s Steam Shovel”. Was a favorite when I was 7 or 8....

I always liked Katy and the big snow myself with Mike Mulligan as a close second. 

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Every time I see a cable shovel, ever since I was about a six year old kid, I say "you are a snort".

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4 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I always liked Katy and the big snow myself with Mike Mulligan as a close second. 

I have both of those books still, kinda disappointed that my son didn’t like them as much as I did. Katy was a impressive dozer!

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😀

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1 hour ago, NY1468 said:

I have both of those books still, kinda disappointed that my son didn’t like them as much as I did. Katy was a impressive dozer!

Send him up to my place for a week.  I can arrange a bit of dozer time for him!!

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1 hour ago, NY1468 said:

I have both of those books still, kinda disappointed that my son didn’t like them as much as I did. Katy was a impressive dozer!

She sure was. Reminds me of my friend’s grandfather, used to maintain roads for the town of Wilton CT, talked about being out at the top of Wolf Pit Hill having pushed and pushed and pushed with a dozer (probably a td15) had a giant snowball he was trying to maneuver off to the side when he pushed too close to the edge and it got away from him. Says he watched helplessly as it rolled down gathering speed till the road flattened out near the bottom and it disintegrated into a pile he then had to go deal with 😂 

no one got hurt. 

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Never been around a cable shovel but there were alone of drag lines round here. There was a local sand plant running one till they went under about 10 years ago. Thx-Ace 

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lossy-page1-1024px-thumbnail.tif.jpg

As an indicator of size, note cars for scale.

Big Brutus

Big Brutus

Big Brutus

The newspapers called it a coal monster, and a monster it was. Dubbed "Big Brutus," the enormous power shovel towered 15 stories high and weighed 11 million pounds. Purchased in 1962 from the Bucyrus-Erie Company of Milwaukee, the machine's cost was $6.5 million. To ship the shovel to Cherokee County, 150 railroad cars were needed, and once there it took a year to build.

When the work was completed in June 1963, Big Brutus, with its 90-cubic yard shovel, could move 150 tons of coal in one bite, enough to fill three railroad gondolas. The shovel was behemoth, capable of only moving .22 miles per hour. It was used to remove the dirt and rock from on top of the coal and provided coal to seven electric companies.

Coal mining in Kansas began in the 1850s. Lead and zinc deposits of southeast Kansas drew a large number of workers to the area in the 1880s and 1890s who found jobs in the shallow shafts.  Strip mining began in the 1870s and became the preferred method by the 1930s.  Power shovels like Big Brutus were used to remove the layers of coal.  However the minerals had been depleted by the 1970s and the mines closed in the 1980s. During the history of mining in Kansas, more than 300 million tons of coal was processed.

Although designed to last a quarter of a century, the big shovel was used for only a decade. The coal in the area had been depleted, and coal prices made digging what was left unprofitable, since it required 6,900 volts of electricity just to start Big Brutus. By 1973 the shovel was obsolete.  Deeming the it too big to move and too expensive to dismantle, the owners stripped Brutus of its electrical and auxiliary equipment, leaving it to rust, a dinosaur of the technological age.

Eventually the old shovel received new hope when a non-profit corporation dedicated to the mining heritage of southeast Kansas decided they wished to make a theme park dedicated to coal mining, with Big Brutus as the centerpiece. The P&M Coal Company donated the shovel, 16 surrounding acres, and $100,000 to the project. Volunteers quickly restored Big Brutus, and it now operates as a museum. With the claim that it is the largest existing electric shovel in the world, the coal monster of southeast Kansas lives again, now teaching children and families about the history of coal and Kansas.

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Marion 6360 "The Captain"

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At the time of its creation in 1965 for the Southwestern Illinois Coal Corporation, the Marion 6360 was the world’s largest mobile land machine; with ballast it weighed 28 million pounds. It required 10 months for field erection at the Captain mine near Percy in Southern Illinois. Working around the clock, seven days a week, it helped deliver approximately 150 railroad carloads of coal a day. It moved overburden 270 tons at a pass, uncovering two coal seams simultaneously at the mine.

 
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This interior view shows the two hoist drums that were driven by eight 1,000 hp electric motors, the largest ever used in an excavator. Four 3 1/2-inch wire ropes hoisted the dipper through a two part hitch. One of eight 625 hp swing motors is in the background.

Four motor generator sets converted 14,000 volt AC power to direct current for twenty main-drive motors capable of 30,000 horsepower output. The shovel could propel itself at 1/4 mph on four pairs of crawlers. Each crawler was 45 feet long and 16 feet high. Each crawler shoe measured ten feet across and tipped the scales at 3 1/2 tons.

The operator could telephone nine other stations on the machine, talk to the ground by loudspeaker, or to other mine areas by radio. A 3-man 8-story elevator transported crewmen from the lower frame to the machinery deck and gantry structure.

There was more than a mile of wire rope in the Marion 6360. The hefty dipper measured 24 feet from teeth to door, was 18 feet wide, 24 feet high, and could hold 180 cubic yards of earth and rock.

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1742625425_Screenshot_20200801-155311_SamsungInternet.thumb.jpg.5c5b4cc6210cde27c99ba209272f01d9.jpg this. Is the one they used to have at work. Its in MN. Now at a museum restored to working order  I remember seeing it there  long before I started 

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1 hour ago, dannyredfan said:

1742625425_Screenshot_20200801-155311_SamsungInternet.thumb.jpg.5c5b4cc6210cde27c99ba209272f01d9.jpg this. Is the one they used to have at work. Its in MN. Now at a museum restored to working order  I remember seeing it there  long before I started 

I assume this is the Osgood shovel at Western Minnesota Steam Threshers.  Rollag Minnesota. I think I have some pictures and maybe a video of it. 

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Can't say. What brand it is . But I would love to go see it restored 

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14 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

I assume this is the Osgood shovel at Western Minnesota Steam Threshers.  Rollag Minnesota. I think I have some pictures and maybe a video of it. 

Yes I did some looking. That is it

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