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I know this has probably been discussed to death but I am trying to figure out a plow size for a 282 706. I know that back in the day around here a 460 gas would from time to tome carry the front wheels on a 3 bottom 14 inch plow with no weights on the front in corn ground that was plowed every year. Trying to figure out if a 706d could handle a 3-16 or a 3-18. Tractor has two sets of rear weights, no fluid and some weights on the front. Tires are 15.5-38 Firestone about half tread and the ground would be alfalfa ground that's red clay. 

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it would handle those 3 bottoms easily - has it been turned up? original 282? my latest 560 w/282 woudl pull 3 16 easy peasy but it was singing 2400rpms, IH turned them up even more in the combines if you want to go down that road and throwng more rpms/fuel to it 

with the extra weight of a 706 a 3 bottom is a cake walk for a 706 

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706 diesel should pull 5-14's no problem.  Grandad and dad pulled 6-14's with 806 gas tractors. 

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Depends on your ground, but you should be safe with 4-16s in a semi mount.  3-16s or 3-18 would likely not load it much.  


How many acres are you plowing?  

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1 hour ago, Mudfly said:

Depends on your ground, but you should be safe with 4-16s in a semi mount.  3-16s or 3-18 would likely not load it much.  


How many acres are you plowing?  

It's only 8 to 10 acres. We rarely plow anything, it's all notill anymore. But the thing that worries me is how hard our ground gets, a 2 shank subsoiler is all a 886 can handle in our ground. like I said earlier it's red clay, very high clay percentage and if worked at the wrong time we end up with a field full of baseball clods. I just don't want to over work the old gal

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I live in a high clay area also.  I still say 5 bottom plow.  I get tickled at the guys who say black loam pulls hard.  Those guys must have never plowed clay.  If you are conservative, go 4 bottom, and it will pull it like nothing.  You could also use a different tractor.  Just sayin. 

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I'm not sure whether to use my "not all ground is the same" speech or my "why pull the guts out of a 60 year old tractor" speech here. Guess we'll all find out together, so here goes...

Yes, a 706 is a "5 plow" tractor per the advertising from 1963. Even then, that was in ideal ground, and you were running the tractor at maximum capacity, or beyond if you thought the tractor wasn't pulling it fast enough and coerced the mechanic to turn up the smoke screw, and/or installed an M&W turbo kit.

57 years down the line with repairs being expensive, and you never knowing the exact condition of your tractor, IMHO it pays to take it a little easy. Cruising along with 3-18's vs clawing and scraping for every inch with a 5-14, the choice is clear to me.

Now, around here 5-14's is a good way to keep a 706 from rolling away if the park lock is broken. The tractor would just sit and spin unless you weighted it down, then it would run out of power unless you turboed it and turned the pump all the way up. Then it would launch the head into space, or tear up the transmission, so it's a no-win situation. This ground gives a turned-up 1066 a run for its money with 5-16's.

Heh, looks like I did a bit of a hybrid speech.

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Back in the day they pulled 5's with 706 gasers here, as my dad said they sounded like airplane ready to take off up river, eating valves all the way.  We had a 706 with a D282, 4-14's was all it wanted in our clay, 5's never would have happened.  

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Where I live a 4-16 would be a full load if you need any depth in plowing I had a 806 and tried both a  4-18 and 5-16 and it was a good load  We paired a lot of 1086s to 5-18 720 when they were new. Back in the day of the 706 literature being printed a lot of 14 inch plows were sold so they  could pull a 5 bottom and do a good job of skimming the soil nowadays people  tend to plow deeper. 

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Have to remember also that a 560 was touted as a five 14 tractor. I think they went by the size of the hood on the tractor and not the size of the engine.  We actually sold our first 560 diesel with a five bottom plow.  He ended up with another tractor in front of it from what I understand but he moved several miles away and we never had any more contact with him. 

Most 706's pulled four around here and some with three pretty much all 16 inch bottoms.  Soil, depth and bottom tell the story. 

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I'm thinking that I'll try the 3-18 I have and see what happens. If that's too much I'll try to track down a 3-14, I don't think I can do a 4 bottom and I really don't want to break anything. 

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There were quite a few gas 706's around home back when they were new. They ALL pulled 4-14's. Maybe a couple north of town pulled 4-16's.

We had lots of clay sidehills. They were tough,  as in pull the TA back going DOWNHILL.  And if you want to see good black dirt that pulls hard, watch guys plow at Half Century.

If you only have 8-10 acres hook up the 3-18's, it's only going to take you 4-5 hours.

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Dad pulled a 4-14 with the 400 gas.    Then we got a 806 and pulled 5-16, the stack would turn cherry red but it pulled it!   I tried running that same combo a few years back and it was like trying to plow concrete....I think the soil is getting harder from all the big machinery & mono cropping.

I think a 4-14 or 4-16 would be an ideal combo with a 706.

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Our big tractor in the later sixties was a 706 gasser.  4 14's was about right on it.  4 16's would have probably worked but it would have had it's hands full at times.

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In the spring of 1964, my Dad bought a new IH 706 with a D-282 as well as an IH 550 5-bottom plow(not sure on the bottom size, but I believe it was 16"). In all honesty, that was probably too much plow most of the time. I remember Dad and our IH dealer talking one day....they came to the conclusion that most farmers around there thought that an 806 pulled 6 bottoms better than a 706 pulled 5 bottoms. That was Dad's heavy tillage combo until the 706 was replaced by a new 1086 in the spring of 1978. Still have both the 706 and the plow.

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16 hours ago, 885 said:

I'm thinking that I'll try the 3-18 I have and see what happens. If that's too much I'll try to track down a 3-14, I don't think I can do a 4 bottom and I really don't want to break anything. 

It will do just fine.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Take it easy on the old girl....I'm sure she's earned her keep over the years.  I have that same tractor and we pulled 5-14's.  As everyone understands, the type of soil can make a huge difference.  Ours had fluid in the rears and in soil that had any clay the front end would come up off the ground 6 - 8 inches and she'd lug through it.  

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My triple six with a D312 (few more ponies than a D282) plowing sod with a Ford 101 with 3-16's is a good match.You should have no problem pulling 3-16's.

Paul

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