Jump to content

282 trouble


brewcrew
 Share

Recommended Posts

I found a 706 with the 282 glow plug Diesel engine. Guy thought it has a blown head gasket, but when cranking it over it seems to put pressure back out the intake. Spraying ether will send more back at you than in the engine, and it flat out won’t fire. Will a head gasket cause this? Or is there something more serious going on?

One additional thought: this happened right after rebuilding the injection pump. Could the pump be wrong causing everything else? It ran for a while with the pump mounted, but started making bad noises so got parked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

anything is possible when its out of time - there are several here who can tell u how to check the time of the pump and engine to see if something is wrong there, i have read about it a few times here but havent had to do it nor have it in my memory - our 282 that blew head gasket multiple times blew pressure into radiator or would suck it dry and burn the water/antifreeze 

i have seen out of time engines blow up through the carb/intake when they try to fire and I have had engines with cracked or pistons with holes in them blow out the crankcase/vacuum lines and valve covers from the compression blowing up thru the bottom end. 

my guess would be timing and yes they will rattle/knock when out of time like they are going to blow/lock up too

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Thesd5488 said:

Check timing then head gasket

Like he said, start cheap, doesn't cost anything to check the timing. Head gasket is going to cost you some money. Mine is blown between two and three and makes it sound like an air compressor without the air filter. Sounds like you should be able to see where it's blown, but can only hear it through the intake without the piping attached. Also, it doesn't use any antifreeze. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Intake valve (s) hanging open? Bent? Soot?  Out of adjustment?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Timing might be off, but that isn't why it is blowing back through the intake.  Unless valve timing is off, which is plausible I suppose.  Blown head gasket or valve issues are likely.  Test or disassemble to confirm. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, brewcrew said:

Guy thought it has a blown head gasket, but when cranking it over it seems to put pressure back out the intake

Could have the head gasket blown between cylinders.  That makes for some weird symptoms.

Edit to add, the engine will run with a blown head gasket between two cylinders so that is not your problem likely. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

pump is 180* out of time, so it's injecting fuel when valves are partially open in overlap, not closed on the compression stroke. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Injpumped said:

pump is 180* out of time, so it's injecting fuel when valves are partially open in overlap, not closed on the compression stroke. 

He said it ran for a few minutes with the injection pump on as it is. Is that possible with it off 180?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

they may run 180* out of time, but would not have started well, or will not make enough power to pull itself. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Injpumped said:

they may run 180* out of time, but would not have started well, or will not make enough power to pull itself. 

We have a longtime pump shop 60 miles away. Started by two old Russian German guys from the area. They had a good reputation. I would bet they fixed a few hundred pumps for us. Years ago we took a pump for a 4320 jd down and a set of injectors from a 4010 same trip. Put the 4320 pump on would not run. With ether it would run a bit. Turned pump 180 same thing. Dad and Tractors owner took pump back down . Owner who rebuilt it said give him an hour it will be done. They picked it up owner said nothing wrong with pump but it will run now with a smile. Put it back on it ran. The guys have passed on but one owner son still does pumps there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/17/2020 at 9:47 AM, Gearclash said:

Could have the head gasket blown between cylinders.  That makes for some weird symptoms.

Edit to add, the engine will run with a blown head gasket between two cylinders so that is not your problem likely. 

Never did that to a Diesel, but blew a head gasket between 3 and 4 on a 460 gas. Right between the 2 cylinders. It ran, not well. But never lost coolant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Reichow7120 said:

Never did that to a Diesel, but blew a head gasket between 3 and 4 on a 460 gas. Right between the 2 cylinders. It ran, not well. But never lost coolant.

My experience was with an 856, D407.  Head gasket failed between jugs 5 and 6.  Ran halfway decent for 2 cylinders being affected, no coolant lose either.  My suspicion is that corrosion weakened the gasket there. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bet money it's a blown head gasket between the cylinders. Usually they still start and run, but it's hard to get started and lacks power. I took a glow plug and knocked the ends off and brazed an air Chuck fitting on it so you can pressurize the cylinder. Let me know if you want a picture to help explain it. Works very good, and my compression tester uses the same style ends. I'd be willing to say that the bad noises was from too much timing and firing hard, it will make a very pronounced knocking noise. Thus, too much timing is going to take out the head gasket in the weakest, thinnest spot, between the cylinders. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pull the intake manifold and valve cover,  and watch the valves and make sure that they all are moving while cranking the engine over with the starter.  Removing the manifold makes it possible to remove the valve cover much easier.

Using a flat prybar through the hole on the right side of the bell housing turn the engine so the valves for cylinder # 6 are in overlap (Exhaust valve closing and intake valve opening). Now line up the pointer with TDC mark on the flywheel  (Make sure you are turning the flywheel counterclockwize  CCW when viewed from the rear) with the pointer.  When cylinder 6 is on overlap, cylinder # 1 is on compression stroke. 

Now remove the small cover on the side of the injection pump ( the little cover that is held on with 2 small screws) and check if the two timing lines are aligned with each other.  With the valve cover removed you can also check the valve lash (0.027). 

This will tell you if the pump is in time, that all valve are moving and that the valve lash is correct.  If ever thing checks out, it time to remove the cylinder head. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I highly doubt that engine is going to start if the pump is 180 off. Sorry, these old 282 need all the compression they can get to fire. The glow plugs are going to help it some, but I don't see it running 180 off. I am willing to bet the pump was advanced way to much in timing when it was put back on and took out the head gasket. If it runs with the pump 180 off, it has to be a dang good engine, or there was another fuel source, i.e. ether or something of that nature. I've installed one on a 1456 180 off and all it did was smoke like a freight train, and they are way above on the compression ratio vs the 282. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...