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Fred B

Milo Harvest, South Texas

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Today my son and I got started with milo.  I have a 2388 that I bought two years ago.  Son is running the combine.  I am driving a 1991 7150 with a Caldwell 750BU auger cart.  The auger cart was built by E. L. Caldwell and Sons, Corpus Christi, TX about 15 miles from my place.  The milo is turning out right at 5200 lbs/acre.  We cut 8 semi loads today and only got stuck once.  Here is some photos.  

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That’s some itchy stuff right there. 

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great pictures   Fred !!

...pardon my "down under "  ignorance.....but is "milo " like "sorghum"..is it sorghum ??!!….sort of looks like what we call  sorghum...….

...you have some vast paddocks there  !

Mike

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8 minutes ago, mike newman said:

great pictures   Fred !!

...pardon my "down under "  ignorance.....but is "milo " like "sorghum"..is it sorghum ??!!….sort of looks like what we call  sorghum...….

...you have some vast paddocks there  !

Mike

Yes, it is sorghum.

Grain Sorghum (Milo)

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So when do you normally plant milo ? If we plant in early May ,then we can harvest in October if it gets into late May or early June, then harvest usually drags into November.

Do you plant another crop behind it ?

 

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Local coop here says most of the milo raised in this area is hauled to the Mississippi by rail then put on barges ending up in Mexico and some of that goes further by boat and goes all the way to Japan. 

What Japan does with it you would laugh at if I told you . 

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Interesting. The guys that rent our farm planted some milo a couple weeks ago. Its probably 4-6" tall now, if even that. Itchy stuff.

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19 minutes ago, SDman said:

Interesting. The guys that rent our farm planted some milo a couple weeks ago. Its probably 4-6" tall now, if even that. Itchy stuff.

In the dog days of July and August moving the sprinkler system irrigation pipe, quarter to half a mile depending on the field at 6:00 AM and again at 6:00 PM was a challenge.  Early system was three (3) inch aluminum pipe with sprinkler head on one end and the latch mechanism on the other.  Pushed the pipe inward and to the left to unlatch pipe and lifted over your head to move.  As I got older I was able to balance and move two (2) pipe at a time. As the milo matured and grew taller, it was more of a challenge and the taller the itchier the milo.  The cold water running down your back was an early morning surprise and on a hot afternoon, enjoyable.  I still own a pair of the knee high rubber mud boots worn for the task.  When we were able to level several fields and went to flood pipe, a godsend.  Later, on non flood irrigated fields, the irrigation systems were on four (4) foot high aluminum wheels and each section had a gasoline powered engine with a very simple transmission to move the pipe, seemed to be forty (40) feet per move. Today, the Zimmatic circle systems.

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Actually it appears grain sorghum and milo can be used interchangeably.   I'm a poor typist so I use milo because it's a four letter word and if I used sorghum I would have to put the word grain in front of it.  😄  Depending on if there are no freezes forcast, we can start planting the middle of February.  This field was planted March 2.  We started the year quite dry.  In fact, we were waiting on a rain when they finally said we would get a shower so we planted.  It came up nice, still dry.  We got 5-1/2 inches in five days in April.  And small 1/2 inch rains since then.  We needed rain sooner than we got it. 

Very little double crop is planted here.  Sorghum works good in rotation with cotton.  Cotton is our better money crop.   Most of our milo goes rail to Mexico, or export through the Port of Corpus Christi.  We have no irrigation here.  Milo is much more drought tolerant than corn.  Milo is our second most planted crop after cotton.  About half of my county (Nueces) is surveyed in sections.  I have some 1-1/10 mile rows (mile long rows).  I have heard of some 2 mile long fields in the southeast part of the county.  

Our cotton crop looks good.  Here is a photo of one my cotton fields in the foreground and the neighbors trying to farm half the county with a bunch of grain trucks in a row.  There are two big John Deere combines, and grain carts in that field somewhere.  This man controls about 25,000 acres.  All new John Deere equipment but of course the farm is, for payment purposes, split up into at least 4-5 operators.  As I understand it he knows what the equipment is going to be worth in trade on his next new equipment.  John Deere also does prototype testing on his place.  

Notice the clouds above.  It rained him out in the next 30 minutes.    They just moved to a different field. This was about 10 days ago.

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That a cool picture!!! I didn’t realize that you combine milo with a platform header?! Interesting!!

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Platform headers along with “milo guards”. Way faster than with a row head. Lots of milo fed in Kansas. A number of ethanol plants use Milo. 

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We used to grow milo here but not anymore. Milo is a much better dryland crop in my area but it's hard to sell here. The poultry feed mills will pay much much more for corn than the elevators will for milo.

Do you ratoon your milo?

Thx-Ace 

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That is a nice stand of cotton. Around here and up on the south plains there isn't much cotton this year.  Mostly rained or hailed out. Some guys around re-planted 3 times and still haven't got a good stand.

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My only experience with Milo was when I worked at the local Asgrow corn plant in the summers during high school and college. A lot of my time was spent in the warehouse sorting corn that was returned. Returns that came from Kansas would also return milo or grain sorghum along with the corn.

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What is price per hundred of milo now ?

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I don't know of anyone in the area that does  ratooning.  By this time, it's usually too dry for regrowth. 

According to the grain sorghum check off (percentage of sales price required by government for research and development) milo has near the same feeding value as corn.  The whole world is indoctrinated that corn fed beef matters, and that's the mind set of everyone.  

Current price is right at $7.00 cwt.  

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I have a friend named Milo, weighs 150, I think he's worth $11.

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9 hours ago, Fred B said:

The whole world is indoctrinated that corn fed beef matters, and that's the mind set of everyone.  

I feed a rolled milo based ration at my feedlots with ensilage.  No corn.  Milo has slightly less energy content than corn and my ration is based accordingly.  Numerous studies have confirmed there is no noticeable difference in dressing percentage, carcass quality or marbling with use of milo as a substitute for corn.

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well it's too bad more people don't know that, it seems the whole world revolves around corn.  Thanks.

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I agree milo makes a great feed. I have feed it myself.

Unfortunately it's hard to sell round here. There are numerous feed mills in my area that buy corn at a positive basis over Chicago. If I sell milo I must haul it over 100 million and take a negative basis. My market speaks!

Thx-Ace 

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