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3 kids killed in tractor accident

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Oh ya the local utility said I’d  be safe in bucket. LOL

john

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9 hours ago, sandhiller said:

Wife tells of when she was very young. Her and brothers and sisters were riding in loader bucket with legs dangling down. Dad was driving and for some reason couldn't stop coming up to a stock tank. They all got their legs lifted and one of her brothers grabbed little Jeanie and lifted her up out of the way.  Bucket hit the tank and pushed it a bit. Not sure what happened but the thought of 5 or six kids possibly losing their legs below the knee makes me shudder. 

I will lift my wife and boys up to pick apples but even that makes me nervous. Fairly new loader and hoses in good shape BUT anything mechanical is not fail proof. 

Clutches fail at the worst times (when you want to stop), neighbors wife pushing silage up a pile went over the end when her clutch failed and not enough time to react. It was early on the pile and only a drop of about 5 feet, luckily she was just bruised up a little but the tractor took some damage. 

Too many Children die in preventable accidents every year. Like the pic from 806 man above. That gentleman needs a friendly but firm, no BS education in respect for machinery. 

 

You are right on about machine failure, but I never thought about the harms way people are in when they are in buckets, with the farmland around here I never see it, but I guess its there.

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On 7/2/2020 at 9:02 AM, Qc.Can.IH man said:

Here in Quebec there is a law against that sort of thing, even if you are riding inside the cab of a tractor without a seat and a seatbelt for the passenger both can be charged with a $1200 fine and 14 points off your drivers license!

 It’s basically the same fine as if you were riding down the road sitting on the hood or the roof of the car, I’m not sure how many enforcement officers know about it when it comes to farm equipment or are willing to enforce it, somethings I can see turning a blind eye to but things like that are an accident waiting to happen!

 

They really don't let you have any fun up there eh?

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Bought my shop in 92.

Was an abandoned 30 ft square block house.

Built it into a 50x50 shop.

During that time, neighbor dairyman told me a married couple with infant twin girls rented the house.

Father backed out of the garage and ran over one daughter, killing her.

Then about 15 yrs later, a customer of mine backed over his grandson, also killing him.

These tragedys all came back to me during the "Joe" incident.

I'm paranoid anymore when backing ANYTHING.

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1 hour ago, MTO said:

Bought my shop in 92.

Was an abandoned 30 ft square block house.

Built it into a 50x50 shop.

During that time, neighbor dairyman told me a married couple with infant twin girls rented the house.

Father backed out of the garage and ran over one daughter, killing her.

Then about 15 yrs later, a customer of mine backed over his grandson, also killing him.

These tragedys all came back to me during the "Joe" incident.

I'm paranoid anymore when backing ANYTHING.

More power to you for being "paranoid" when backing up, it stops you from becoming complacent when driving forwards or backwards, I've had a couple of "whoops" when backing out of park stalls and always try to be extra vigilent when driving, especially at my age when grey hair is usually watched with an attitude of " watch out for the old guy" way of thinking.

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4 hours ago, MTO said:

These tragedys all came back to me during the "Joe" incident.

I'm paranoid anymore when backing ANYTHING.

A few years back I jumped in the pickup to move it or something, I heard a strange noise and hit the clutch and rolled back a bit. My weimeraner came squirting out from under the stock trailer. It was a hot day and he was huntin shade. Skinned up his head and folded an ear. Luckily I always take off slow but after that I always look underneath before I drive off in anything. 

 

You can never be too careful or even paranoid if that's what you want to call it. The extra minute it takes to be sure of your surroundings is a small price to pay vs a lifetime of regret if the unthinkable should happen. 

 

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I've often thought you can take a piece if 1/4 angle iron, x length of hyd cyl shaft, cut and worm drive clamp it to shaft (at least one side) for a safety when in bucket, use ladder to enter.

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On 7/2/2020 at 12:03 PM, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Riding in a loader bucket never really appealed to me,  terribly rough ride, and dirty. But riding on the drawbar of an H or M, one arm hanging onto the seat and other reaching forward to grab the headlight bar was typical, even if you were pulling something like the auger wagon or water wagon to/from the hog pasture. It was Do THAT or walk. Fenders would have provided protection from the spinning tire but everybody knew not to mess with the tires. And two riders were easy to accommodate. Any more than that and you had the pickup out in the fields and had plenty of room in back.

   Sounds like a L-O-T more people, especially kids hanging on this tractor than there could be room for,  sounds like saw logs and kids in the bucket. Not many details of what happened, if it was on a lane on the property, or a public road. Probably would have been wiser to take a loader tractor And a pickup.

Denny,

You story brings back memories. Spent many hours as a kid riding an M like that! I have often thought that I would never let my kids or now grandkids ride like that.

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5 hours ago, Dasnake said:

More power to you for being "paranoid" when backing up, it stops you from becoming complacent when driving forwards or backwards, I've had a couple of "whoops" when backing out of park stalls and always try to be extra vigilent when driving, especially at my age when grey hair is usually watched with an attitude of " watch out for the old guy" way of thinking.

I almost never park head-in after I failed to notice someone directly behind me backing out at the same time.  When backing in I can see approaching vehicles all around me, and driving out it is a lot easier to see others.  (And I love the backup camera in the pickup!).

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2 minutes ago, E160BHM said:

I almost never park head-in after I failed to notice someone directly behind me backing out at the same time.  When backing in I can see approaching vehicles all around me, and driving out it is a lot easier to see others.  (And I love the backup camera in the pickup!).

Ya know I see more peeps backing in their stalls and after that whoops I referred to it is a **** of an idea when applicable.

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On 7/2/2020 at 12:03 PM, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Riding in a loader bucket never really appealed to me,  terribly rough ride, and dirty. But riding on the drawbar of an H or M, one arm hanging onto the seat and other reaching forward to grab the headlight bar was typical, even if you were pulling something like the auger wagon or water wagon to/from the hog pasture. It was Do THAT or walk. Fenders would have provided protection from the spinning tire but everybody knew not to mess with the tires. And two riders were easy to accommodate. Any more than that and you had the pickup out in the fields and had plenty of room in back.

   Sounds like a L-O-T more people, especially kids hanging on this tractor than there could be room for,  sounds like saw logs and kids in the bucket. Not many details of what happened, if it was on a lane on the property, or a public road. Probably would have been wiser to take a loader tractor And a pickup.

Doc, I spent hours and hours riding with my uncle one leg on drawbar, one on axle housing , one hand on light bar & other holding onto the back of the seat when I was little. Could be plowing, dishing, planting or hauling feed to the feed lot 2 miles from home. Looking back realize how dangerous it was. One slipm& I could have been dead but never thought about it back then. When Chad was young he would ride on the fender next to me. When I got my first cab tractor 1066,  I put a 2nd seat in it for him to ride on., When his son was little his now wife didnt evennwant him riding in the cab of a tractor or a combine even though they had 2nd seats with seat belts.

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Lots of hours spent riding on left fenders here prior to 1978. Lost a couple hat's being blown off by semi's going the opposite direction on a 2 lane state route. I'd pull the ole hat down tight right before we turned on it, because I was told to keep your left hand in the grab hole and the other on the rear lip all the time otherwise I couldn't ride anymore. That's one rule I didn't break, because I enjoyed riding too much. I would have got booted from riding would have been the worst punishment imaginable in my mind. Lol!

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I will use a bucket for a work stand but usually will park it at the work height and use a ladder to access it.

The story of the failed clutch linkage brings back two memories:

I was a about 17 working in a garage and brought in a diesel truck over the pit for an oil change. Hydraulic clutch line split and it was just going to keep going until it hit the wall. I managed to brake/physically pull it out of gear all at the same time while getting a dirty look from the boss who was in imminent danger.

Better story:

I was about 16 working in a gas station in town. My friend came by in his '66 Impala 396, got on it, and never stopped! I thought he was crazy. He was heading towards the busiest area AND a traffic light.

Well, LH motor mount broke which pulled the clutch cross shaft out of the ball on the block, pulled the vacuum hose out of the brake booster, and shorted the starter ignition bypass wire to the hot battery lead. He couldn't de-clutch, couldn't brake, and couldn't shut it off. All he could do is steer and ride it out until the valves started to float and the engine rocked back down which un-shorted the ignition bypass and the engine quit. He came walking back to the station, about a quarter mile walk, white as a ghost and still shaking. It took us a while to figure out why the engine wouldn't stop when he shut the key off but we found the arced wires when up on the lift.

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On 7/4/2020 at 6:47 AM, new guy said:

They really don't let you have any fun up there eh?

We have lots of fun… Until we get caught!

 

12 hours ago, E160BHM said:

I almost never park head-in after I failed to notice someone directly behind me backing out at the same time.  When backing in I can see approaching vehicles all around me, and driving out it is a lot easier to see others.  (And I love the backup camera in the pickup!).

 

12 hours ago, Dasnake said:

Ya know I see more peeps backing in their stalls and after that whoops I referred to it is a **** of an idea when applicable.

I always back in when parking, there’s just too many people in a big hurry who try to get past you instead of waiting for a minute so you can back out!

 

back in May I was picking up a couple of totes of seed when the guy loading me told me about the fire call that he got, apparently the farmer was up in the bucket and somehow or another the bucket fell off the loader and landed on him, he was killed instantly!

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5 hours ago, New Englander said:

I will use a bucket for a work stand but usually will park it at the work height and use a ladder to access it.

The story of the failed clutch linkage brings back two memories:

I was a about 17 working in a garage and brought in a diesel truck over the pit for an oil change. Hydraulic clutch line split and it was just going to keep going until it hit the wall. I managed to brake/physically pull it out of gear all at the same time while getting a dirty look from the boss who was in imminent danger.

Better story:

I was about 16 working in a gas station in town. My friend came by in his '66 Impala 396, got on it, and never stopped! I thought he was crazy. He was heading towards the busiest area AND a traffic light.

Well, LH motor mount broke which pulled the clutch cross shaft out of the ball on the block, pulled the vacuum hose out of the brake booster, and shorted the starter ignition bypass wire to the hot battery lead. He couldn't de-clutch, couldn't brake, and couldn't shut it off. All he could do is steer and ride it out until the valves started to float and the engine rocked back down which un-shorted the ignition bypass and the engine quit. He came walking back to the station, about a quarter mile walk, white as a ghost and still shaking. It took us a while to figure out why the engine wouldn't stop when he shut the key off but we found the arced wires when up on the lift.

he was one of the reasons GM sent out a little bracket and cable to attach to the frame and engine to keep the motor from rolling  WHEN the mount broke they sent one for my 67  Impala

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4 hours ago, R190 said:

he was one of the reasons GM sent out a little bracket and cable to attach to the frame and engine to keep the motor from rolling  WHEN the mount broke they sent one for my 67  Impala

Ha! My sister snapped the mount on her '65 Impala. She had happened to drop by the gas station where I worked when we had Franks' '66 on the lift doing the forensics and putting the clutch shaft back on. So knew what needed to be done when it later happened to her. With the help of her otherwise useless boyfriend, she used the bumper jack between the frame and manifold, I guess, to get the engine high enough to slip the cross shaft back on and drive gingerly until I replaced the mount. She didn't have any kind of wild ride, just dropped the shaft. Hers was just a 283 but she left lots of rubber around! My other sister had a Buick GS400 with the 430 engine. What a sweet ride! Powder blue with a white leather interior, a true chick's car.  A pilot friend of mine, quite a pit younger, put my name and hers together. She started teaching 3rd grade at 21 in his school. He said all the boys were in love with her; a cute redhead with the hot car!

Pretty common happening back then. I remember the cables coming out and then a replacement mount that had a metal tab that would limit the travel should or rather, when, the rubber broke.

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Another fatal in the accident now four.

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