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Logging Sleighs


jeeper61
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Jeeper...some of the old tram  ''trails''  in various parts of NZ.....also have been turned  /  upgraded, obviously after many years of neglect.....to easy walking trails.....Very popular in the summer months

Mike

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,,,few more....the first picture 'caption'  shows a Fordson tractor.....To me the radiator cap assembly looks wrong...and the air cleaner set up looks IHC...as does the 'bonnet''......??   1957  picture

second  is obviously Fordson...which subsequently , ran to its destruction...no date...and not surprising considering the load behind a small ''tractor ''

third picture is a Johnson  'A" lokey...(made in Melbourne, Australia )...after a fatal  derailment , January, 1911...this but a few miles from where lived..

last picture depicts a similiar  incident...another fatal runaway...this time on a steep incline in the North Island....1910

Mike

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On 10/22/2021 at 2:31 AM, mike newman said:

,,,few more....the first picture 'caption'  shows a Fordson tractor.....To me the radiator cap assembly looks wrong...and the air cleaner set up looks IHC...as does the 'bonnet''......??   1957  picture

second  is obviously Fordson...which subsequently , ran to its destruction...no date...and not surprising considering the load behind a small ''tractor ''

third picture is a Johnson  'A" lokey...(made in Melbourne, Australia )...after a fatal  derailment , January, 1911...this but a few miles from where lived..

last picture depicts a similiar  incident...another fatal runaway...this time on a steep incline in the North Island....1910

Mike

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Mike ,definitely not a Fordson.More like Mcormick possibly ?.Fuel tank is shorter ,filler cap on Fordsons not that far back,aircleaner wrong as you pointed out.Radiater is fluted at top ,not fordson,steering wheel much higher and set back.Gear shifter in centre;Fordson,s are on left side forward,also lettering on rad iator is not Fordson.Theirs was smaller and was farily well in the centre.The side covers look very Mccormick ? Apart from that ,great pics.

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4 minutes ago, Pukeko said:

Mike ,definitely not a Fordson.More like Mcormick possibly ?.Fuel tank is shorter ,filler cap on Fordsons not that far back,aircleaner wrong as you pointed out.Radiater is fluted at top ,not fordson,steering wheel much higher and set back.Gear shifter in centre;Fordson,s are on left side forward,also lettering on rad iator is not Fordson.Theirs was smaller and was farily well in the centre.The side covers look very Mccormick ? Apart from that ,great pics.

yeah...as said, the picture ''caption''  suggests Fordson...but it just didn't look correct !!    10/20.....I reckon

There are some fantastic pictures in this book...including IH stuff  ''modified ''  to suit the various situations

That third picture, where the ''lokey''  (the word "lokey''  is used  extensively , in the book...)  has crashed into that White Pine stump......was in the Opouri Valley....near the Rai Valley....I have done a lot of work up there...never knew about that tram way for the logging..no one ever mentioned it !! 

Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...

Quote :  a  missjudgement  by the brake man, on a wet day, let this one get away... Crew jumped to safety.. ......    no date

second picture shows ''Spragging ''...which evidently  was the time worn method of ''braking '' the unit.   That photo, according to the caption, is the only known photo  of that system..Spoked wheels were required ....and the   train / lokey had to be moving.  A ''sprag'' was an iron bar, which the brake man, poked into the wheel spokes..prior to any descent , The bar would jam on the chassis of the wagon....(Note middle left of photo....showing two ''sprags'' jammed   in the left wheels....)

Good  'hand / eye cordination was required.....a ''failure ''   to place the sprag   quickly and correctly....resulted in  either a broken wrist...or...the sprag could fly out...thus requiring  more frantic attempts to lock a wheel.....1930   photo  and the 'lokey''   was a 22 ton NZ made   one...

From 1888  to   1893  , there were fifteen different   Engineering   Foundry's, in New Zealand   making log hauling  'lokey's"

There was a lot of virgin bush , on difficult terrain , to tempt the ''loggers'' of the day

Last photo is a NZ made Steam   Winch Hauler...with a rated  Winch pull of ten tons..... 20 Horse Power, operating at 150 lbs pressure.....overall weight  12 tons.................. photo circa  1900

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  • 1 month later...

....the International  powered 'lokey''  pulling coal   from the  "Charming Creek '' coal mine... The 'lokey" pulled out four loads of coal, per day, and one load of logs   circa     1954...  West Coast  ....    South Island  .

The IH  has to be a W9   power plant, I believe.....

...the little  0-4-0T, rigid    geared'  lokey' was built in New Zealand   in 1883....picture   taken in 1893, North Island..

Mike

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This whole post is just tops! I could go through and like every pic but im lazy today...lol 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

still a few Lombard loggers left here in Maine many still run, there is a pair of steam locomotives up near Allagash that are setting where they were last used in the early 1900's I see a lot of the photos in this thread are from Maine I gave sledgehammer a book  about logging in this area back in the late 1800's that has some of the same photos I spent a few years in the late 70's working in logging camps in northern Maine It was good paying work and I put enough money away in one winter to buy my first logging truck 

An old Maine guide that I worked with as a young boy told a story of when he worked in the camps during the depression They didn't get paid till mud season in them days and when he came out of the woods that spring he stopped at a store now he'd been in the woods for the winter his wool cloths covered in pitch and sawdust smelling pretty nasty and asked the store owner if he had  any crackers and cheese, the man replied that he did for paying costumers having just been paid for a winters work Stacy pulled a wad of cash out of his pocket and said have you got change for a hundred , the store keeper said I'll have to run over to the bank and have them make change, Stacy says you better hurry or I may buy this place out from under you!!  

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In the video that Jeeper shared you will notice that the firebox stack is just behind the men doing the steering, this is an early model Lombard. the problem was that sparks would fall on the men and some got burned pretty good and none of the men wanted the job of steering so latter models had a canopy added over the steering crew later Lombard added a steering cylinder the very first models had a team of horses in front to lead and steer but the horses would get spooked by the steam and that was a mess!

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I may be wrong but I'm pretty sure that Lombard was the first man to build a set of working tracks to be used on a machine even though Holt and Best clam this, Up in Hinckley Maine at the school of technology the first set that Lombard built used to set in front of the school but when they got Wokeness they got rid of them 

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On 12/10/2021 at 5:49 PM, mike newman said:

....seems like I posted that second picture, some several weeks gone.....:blush:....apologies....\

Mike

Mike, you have always provided some very nice photos and NZ is a pretty country as well as your lifetime of stories, If you can ever find the time you should sit down and wright a book I would buy the first copy Thank you 

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2 hours ago, m.c.farmerboy said:

I see a lot of the photos in this thread are from Maine I gave sledgehammer a book  about logging in this area back in the late 1800's that has some of the same photos

I figured you would have some good logging stories being a native.

Working in the industry you have heard some of the stories from those involved or passed downed from prior generations thank you for sharing. 

I was looking for local downeast historic photos to decorate my camp with and I ran across some good archives with these old photos   

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The gas powered Lombards had a Wisconsin Model PT Engine.

6 Cylinder (cast in pairs)

5-3/4" bore x 7" stroke

1091 CID. (17.9 Liters)

4 Main bearings (2-5/8")

4 bolt rods

bronze backed babbit bearings

100% Full pressure lubrication the oil pump is actually two separate pumps in one - Service & Scavenge. 

Here is a link to a thread on the restoration of one 

https://www.smokstak.com/forum/threads/wisconsin-t-head-restoration-log.83497/

 

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15 hours ago, jeeper61 said:

Couple of Mack Bs working hard 

May be an image of outdoors and tree

This may be a dumb question but we have no lumber industry near by. What would those shorter lengths of logs have been destined to be used for? Fence posts?  They look too short for that? Or something totally different? Pulp for paper maybe?

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20 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

Pulp for paper maybe?

Yes the short 4 footers are Pulp wood for the paper industry.

Before mechanized harvesting the average Joe harvested pulp wood on his property in the winter

They used used a horse drawn Sleigh to take them out to a winter road road were they were picked up by the paper company.

This photo is of that exchange 

 

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