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My weekend project, replacing an irrigation riser

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When I started up my irrigation system I found watering in a field where water should not be. When I checked it out closer water was coming up from the ground. The riser was broken but nobody ran into it??? Must have magically broken on it own.

Anyway, it's fixed now. Here are a couple pics.

Thx-Ace 

Photo0068.jpg

Photo0069.jpg

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What kind of risers do you use down there? About everyone up here uses Watermans or “alfalfa risers”. They are a screw type valve and it looks kind of like what you have there.  I have been switching to Pierce valves which are a butterfly valve and I like them much better. 

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I used to use Waterman but now they are Fresno alfalfa valves. They are completely interchangeable.

I mostly flood irrigate rice and they work well. I'll post a pic of one in use.

How do yours work? Can you post a pic?

Thx-Ace 

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They are just female ring locks coming out of the ground and then I just lock one of these onto them except in a 90 elbow configuration instead of a straight through like pictured. Mine also have an air vent built into them so a separate air vent is not needed  

BD66EC8C-9CF9-4B96-82D5-E6421E10EDF2.jpeg

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We don’t have this stuff up here so I am not familiar, what attaches to these risers? Is it those arched deals with wheels? First time I saw one of those I couldn’t have been more awe struck if a flying saucer landed in front of me. 

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Interesting............Here, they use riser valve stubs with the caps you have to unscrew.  I assume because of the rolling terrain and the potential for freezing which would cause issues in other valves.  Heck when the first systems were put in around here guys would even rent industrial air compressors to blow them out every year, but then most realized if the inlet end of the line wasn't capped, flood water would fill it anyhow so that ended.  Had a rented farm one time were the stub valves were rusted out and wouldn't hold the cap, so it was dig them all up and re-weld on new.  What a pain.  In new installs, the best way I have seen is to put the stub valve up so its still a foot under grade, and put a piece of plastic or steel culvert over it with some concrete around the bottom of it, and back fill with earth from there up.  The culvert gets cut off 6" above grade to keep dirt out, and the biggie.............people from crashing into them with equipment.  The culver takes the whack, and with the riser down in it, it doesn't get hurt.  I then made short pieces of ring lock pipe to get from the riser out of the ground to a working height.  Usually bolted a road delineator onto the culvert edge with reflective tape on it to help people see them.........................And still people would run over them?????  Atleast if the delineator was smashed, there was no question about what happened and it needed inspected for any damage.

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9 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

We don’t have this stuff up here so I am not familiar, what attaches to these risers? Is it those arched deals with wheels? First time I saw one of those I couldn’t have been more awe struck if a flying saucer landed in front of me. 

I attack gated pipe to mine. I believe ace might just let the water run up out of his to flood an entire field for rice- although I’m not certain of that. Center pivots (those arched things with wheels) need a secure base to attach to. Mine attach to a concrete pad. 
 

I pump my pipe lines every fall. 

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You folks have it easy.  Way back in time the irrigation system was a wagon load of interlocking pipes with rainbird hammer rotating sprinkler heads the irrigation pump was powered by the tractor PTO.  We had to set-up 1 section at a time and  knock it down and move it to a new area.   Only good part was the water from the system would wet us down good  and cool us on a hot July day.   Many rabbits would try to make a home out of the pipe.  Their bodies would stop up the system and cause a mess. The good old days of farming.

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Years ago when l was working for guy doing CRP work, we would ask the farmer or land owner "ls there anything out there we need to be aware of? For instance sandfighters or irrigation risers?" And of course the answer was always "Naw!! There ain't nuthin' like that in that field."  And of course naturally before the day was done, we would hit one or the other and tear the crap out of something. Either a big hole in a tire from hitting that "non-existant" sandfighter or break the shear pins on a brush hog caused by hitting a 10" in concrete riser that the farmer says "Oh, yeah....l fergot about that..."  

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Here are pics from this morning.

This is at the top of a rice field.

Photo0073.jpg

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Here is a pipe connected to a riser

Photo0086.jpg

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Here is my primary pump. I pump water from abandoned underground coal mines. I have two pumping locations. This is my primary and the other is a  backup. 

My pipeline is 1.5 miles long and connected to the two pumps. I can pump to any of my fields through the pipeline but a couple fields require some hand lay pipe to irrigate the entrance field. 

We used to hand lay and pickup all the pipe each spring and fall.

Btw this power unit is an IH304 on propane. The old IH engines are very reliable, long lasting engines.

Thx-Ace Photo0085.jpg.4e09d570d799b8c3a8fabbbb13c824f1.jpg

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4 hours ago, oleman said:

You folks have it easy.  Way back in time the irrigation system was a wagon load of interlocking pipes with rainbird hammer rotating sprinkler heads the irrigation pump was powered by the tractor PTO.  We had to set-up 1 section at a time and  knock it down and move it to a new area.   Only good part was the water from the system would wet us down good  and cool us on a hot July day.   Many rabbits would try to make a home out of the pipe.  Their bodies would stop up the system and cause a mess. The good old days of farming.

Who said we don't lay pipe just because we got a buried main?  One farm here was well thought out to hard hose travelers, basically pull up to the riser, lay out the flex from the riser to the reel and fire it up, do a pull in each direction there, and then move to the next riser........................Now that was the exception, most farms had only one riser in a field of 100 acres, so with a traveler you had to lay pipe out from the riser to each reel location.  And then there are most farms here without a buried main, so you put the pump at the river and start laying out 30 ft sticks of 6" aluminum ring lock to where ever your going.  Which could be quite a distance sometimes.................

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4 hours ago, oleman said:

You folks have it easy.  Way back in time the irrigation system was a wagon load of interlocking pipes with rainbird hammer rotating sprinkler heads the irrigation pump was powered by the tractor PTO.  We had to set-up 1 section at a time and  knock it down and move it to a new area.   Only good part was the water from the system would wet us down good  and cool us on a hot July day.   Many rabbits would try to make a home out of the pipe.  Their bodies would stop up the system and cause a mess. The good old days of farming.

Did you have to pump it up hill 6 miles both ways?     (Sorry I couldn't resist)

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l really enjoy seeing how things are done in different parts of the country.  When l was a kid, that was one of my jobs helping Dad throw tubes and make a set. Then later we got 8" gated aluminum pipe...which wasn't too bad until it got full of sand....lol  Then right after Dad retired, the landowner had some center pivots installed. One pic is a google view of the section we lived on after the pivots were done. ln earlier times, that egg shaped playa lake bottom in the upper left of the pic is where l got to plow with a 560LP all by myself. l think was 10 probably.

irrigation ditch and tubes.JPG

irrigation pipe.JPG

Cone farm.jpg

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I irrigate partially with gated pipe, and partially with tarps and open ditch. On the open ditch you use the tarp and an a-frame to make a dam in the ditch, then make cutouts in the ditch to irrigate the field. Pipe is much easier than open ditch, but on a flat field you can get a lot more water through a ditch. Center pivots really make things easy, but also not in my budget either.

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What's a sandfighter?

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9 hours ago, mader656 said:

What's a sandfighter?

Used to break the hard crust after a hard rain on sandy soil. When cotton plants are young and the wind blows very hard it can be just like a sandblaster and kill the cotton plants. The newer ones are 3 pt. and fold up for transport but the old ones were pull type and no wheels so usually had one in or near each field. Eventually for different reasons they get forgot about and covered with sand and weeds.

Sandfighter-old.jpg

JD sandfighter.jpg

JD sandfighter-1.JPG

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4 or 6 inch pipe? 

I have 12 in into underground. It's hard to get enough flow from 8 inch, let alone 4 or 6.

Thx-Ace 

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