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Dimensions of hay wagon stacking square bale


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Got an old Colby wagon for haying , load off baler or off ground. The bed we have does hold much hay . I was thinking it should hold 120 bales  , no sides?  I think the tube was put into the shorter wheel base . 
What’s the average size and amount of bales ?

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never owned a wagon until 2004

loaded truck off ground 65-90b

borrowed a  7.5 x 16' several x  130 was max on flat which we dont have

thrower wagons now 7.95 x 18' with full sides   210 stacked

avg 118 with junk thrower and hills  ...wont go that high or TOO heavy

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When I was a kid our racks were always 7' x 14' as that worked out well for the us unloading with a hay fork as we did 16/layer.  We would usually put 88 on a load.  Today if I was going to build a rack I would probably make it 8' x 16', I would think that would easily hold 120.

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Depends on the terrain and how heavy duty a running gear. Uncle was telling their neighbors had a  old style ih running gear similar to 1 i have. It was set in long postion and one time the coupling pole collapsed as they had too many/heavy bales on it. If its rough hilly field i dont try to get as many on a rack as it just doesnt work out well. Flatter smoother field diff story.

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I go for eight ton running gear 8'x16'. Usually good for 110-120 on our slopes. If i ever get a accumagrapple I'll build to fit it.

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7 hours ago, IH Forever said:

When I was a kid our racks were always 7' x 14' as that worked out well for the us unloading with a hay fork as we did 16/layer.  We would usually put 88 on a load.  Today if I was going to build a rack I would probably make it 8' x 16', I would think that would easily hold 120.

Ha-Ha... our racks were 8 x 16. And 4 high was 72 per load. Baler was an IH 55T, bales 19 inches wide 48 inches long, 16 inches tall. I was about 5-6 yrs old when I drove the M pulling the hay fork. 8 bales per fork. Last 8 bales against the backboards had to be restocked onto the floor of the rack.

After we got the bale elevator we would kinda go overboard, 9 long 6 high and a row 7 high down the center so we didn't have to bake half a load. 108 BIG bales.

Biggest wagon we had, 150 bushel Oliver (EWC) flarebox with 22-1/2" of sideboards was only on an 8 ton Oliver (EWC) gear. Without the sideboards it held 10,000# of dry shell corn.

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I can get 15 if I throw one on the neck 😎  I like mine better. 

Just kidding we do square bales also. Never loaded a wagon, we just use a bumper hitch trailer and a pickup. 16' trailer always holds about 120

20190730_190026.jpg

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12 hours ago, new guy said:

Put less on. Brag to neighbors how many loads you put up.😁

Shorten up bales brag about how many bales you get a load

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Have three wagons we square bale on. A 8x16, 8x20 both flat wagons and built a kicker rack when we got a kicker baler. The kicker was a god send stack all three without breaking a sweat. Isiy get

8x16 160 bales 

8x20 180

Kicker rack is 9x18 the sides are nice on hills and easier stacking get 200 or so on it. 

Have a Deere 337 with pan kicker bales aren't the longest 20180708_201120.thumb.jpg.ea42b5a5a83ae975945e234b6c8279fd.jpgIMG_20200617_222853087.thumb.jpg.0cb8b0990c8d21d4e1933d79fed4147f.jpg

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Right about the time I retired from the Army there was a guy up here who had a couple of dumb teens on a thrower wagon trying to stop the bales flying through the air and stack em. Some city guy who came up here and was going to dairy farm. Wouldn't listen to anyone. The next year he bailed right after a rain. Water was running out of the bottom of the baler. Shortly after that he sold out and moved south.

I use to stack for my dad and BILs dad. 8X16 wagons for the most part. Dad only wanted them 5 high. Old Willard wanted as many as possible. Stacked 7 high on his wagons. I remember getting about 130 per wagon. He had one wagon that was 9' wide. I could get something like 150 or so on that one. Old Willard expected to get 1000 bales a day in the barn from windrows. 4 of us. Willard on a 560D running the baler, me stacking. My BIL running wagons back to the barn and unloading and Kenny in the mow stacking. Started when they finished morning milking/chores and quit right before they started evening milking/chores. Willard liked 3rd gear, 1/2 throttle running the baler. He paid a penny a bale. After I joined the Army and Kenny went to college he went to round bales. The younger SMARTER kids wanted 5 cents a bale.

Rick

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On ‎6‎/‎23‎/‎2020 at 5:54 AM, IH Forever said:

When I was a kid our racks were always 7' x 14' as that worked out well for the us unloading with a hay fork as we did 16/layer.  We would usually put 88 on a load.  Today if I was going to build a rack I would probably make it 8' x 16', I would think that would easily hold 120.

THATS WHAT OURS WERE.. 8 X 16   ROUGHLY 120 BALES...

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Our typical bale flatbed wagon was at least a 6-ton running gear, 8- or 10- is better, used 16" pickup tires, extended the reach, extended the tongue if necessary, truck frame instead of wood stringers, drawbar, heavy-duty back but in a high wind that could turn the wagon into a prairie schooner.

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I hope I can find the Colby tag , will that tell me the weight limit ? I better do that before I bust the old wagon . 

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20 hours ago, Bgriffin856 said:

Have three wagons we square bale on. A 8x16, 8x20 both flat wagons and built a kicker rack when we got a kicker baler. The kicker was a god send stack all three without breaking a sweat. Isiy get

8x16 160 bales 

8x20 180

Kicker rack is 9x18 the sides are nice on hills and easier stacking get 200 or so on it. 

Have a Deere 337 with pan kicker bales aren't the longest 20180708_201120.thumb.jpg.ea42b5a5a83ae975945e234b6c8279fd.jpgIMG_20200617_222853087.thumb.jpg.0cb8b0990c8d21d4e1933d79fed4147f.jpg

Where Are  the hill s you must Close to Ohio , nice job stacking 

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I’d sides up with cast running to center so bales were always pushing tighter to center of wagon . That way they never fall off bouncing though rough stuff , The wagon bed vibration will keep them pushing in. 👌

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3 hours ago, 560Dennis said:

Where Are  the hill s you must Close to Ohio , nice job stacking 

Thanks it's getting to be a lost art. I can do it in my sleep lol About sixty miles or so east of Ohio two miles from the NY state line directly south of chatauqua lake in ny

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8’x16’ is what grandpa and the neighbors all had. I remember when the same neighbors got a very heavy duty gear and built a 8’x24’; I thought it would bend then snap in the middle, but it always held. 
Granted they only kept the cows for another three years. 

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6 hours ago, Bgriffin856 said:

Thanks it's getting to be a lost art. I can do it in my sleep lol About sixty miles or so east of Ohio two miles from the NY state line directly south of chatauqua lake in ny

Just out of Drum distance , smoke signal s 😂

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