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460 utility hydraulic screen in regulator broke off


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Has this ever happen to anybody? I pulled the threaded safety plug out (which is plugged) and the screen decided to break off and stay in the housing. Any advice how to get it out? I used the smallest and longest needle nose i have and couldn't reach it.

Thanks

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Might have to collapse it and pull it out. I know one of mine is broken off short. The block is not too hard to take off. 

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7 minutes ago, bankshotone said:

How do you collapse it? What do you pull it out with?

Might have to collapse it and pull it out. I would try a very small screwdriver or a o-ring pick set. I am trying to remember when I had the one all apart if there is a inner passage way. I will look in the special manual for hydraulic for those I bought a couple years ago when I get home Monday. 

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1 minute ago, VacDaddyt said:

Might have to collapse it and pull it out. I would try a very small screwdriver or a o-ring pick set. I am trying to remember when I had the one all apart if there is a inner passage way. I will look in the special manual for hydraulic for those I bought a couple years ago when I get home Monday. 

Thank you!

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Here is a couple pictures from the manual about the topic. The picture of the oil flow shows that if the .031 hole (G)is blocked it changes the pressure on the flow valve closing the ball at item I  the oil pressure is  pump delivery (High pressure). Oil flows through the orifice all the time but when you move the control valve in the upper part(A) it opens a pilot circuit to change the pressure on the regulator valve stopping the flow there from I through H(normally open when system is not being used). The system operating pressure is controlled by (J)by the spring in the control block. So when the pilot is not being used the system should be on a real low pressure, it only goes to pressure when the pilot circuit changes pressure on H. 

I do not see a passage way in the picture but knowing machining it has to be there just drilled so the passageways meet.

hydraulic chart_2734.jpg

hydra tuch flow.jpg

hydra touch direction.jpg

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24 minutes ago, VacDaddyt said:

Here is a couple pictures from the manual about the topic. The picture of the oil flow shows that if the .031 hole (G)is blocked it changes the pressure on the flow valve closing the ball at item I  the oil pressure is  pump delivery (High pressure). Oil flows through the orifice all the time but when you move the control valve in the upper part(A) it opens a pilot circuit to change the pressure on the regulator valve stopping the flow there from I through H(normally open when system is not being used). The system operating pressure is controlled by (J)by the spring in the control block. So when the pilot is not being used the system should be on a real low pressure, it only goes to pressure when the pilot circuit changes pressure on H. 

I do not see a passage way in the picture but knowing machining it has to be there just drilled so the passageways meet.

hydraulic chart_2734.jpg

hydra tuch flow.jpg

hydra touch direction.jpg

Thank you very much for this information.  I will examine it thoroughly.  I wondered what the theory of operation was in this type of hyd system .

I did manage to get what's left of the screen out by taking a tap and threading into the screen enough to catch it and get it out.

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21 minutes ago, bankshotone said:

Thank you very much for this information.  I will examine it thoroughly.  I wondered what the theory of operation was in this type of hyd system .

I did manage to get what's left of the screen out by taking a tap and threading into the screen enough to catch it and get it out.

Clever!  Nice Idea.  I'll need to put that into my tricks bag.

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The theory at the time(open center) was that having the tractor not under pressure all the time saved horsepower. I remember a story my dad had about the 400. He had a M souped all the way. When the 400 came out he bought one, well because of the live hydraulics and other creature comforts like live PTO and T/A there was power train losses. It could not do what the old M did. He had the 400 souped  up. Well when the 560 came out he thought he had the world in his hand as he didn't have to put the clutch in when chopping like he did with the 400 and a  one row fox chopper. We now are spoiled because the farmers back then were pushing small equipment and did not even have power steering and in some cases our tractors had basic hydraulics and PTO when you put the clutch in.

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