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560Dennis

Slower gear adaption for Farmall C ❓

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I posted about a hydra drive attachments. But the chances of that happening , zed. 
Any ideas

Could the People that use hydra drive have had a better idea ? Got some thing like special gears cuts or put a real hydro dive in a Farmall C ?

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Smaller rear wheels would decrease the ground speed... Every inch in diameter decrease is 3" (ish) in circumference. I don't have a clue how practical it would be, or how much fabricating would be required, but if you put Farmall B drops on the C axles, you could put the 24" B rears on it. That should reduce speed by about a third...

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KWRB,  And one can further slow a tractor down by tire size.  An A or a B with 9.5 x 24 vs. 12.4 x 24 have drastic different road speeds.   Don't ask me how I know.  As we all know and understand smaller diameter to increase power, larger diameter to increase speed.

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I don't know what you are doing with the tractor, or why you need to slow it down..... the guys I work for put steel combine tracks on an 826 hydro to slow it down to pull a tile trencher.  Trencher is run off the PTO so engine speed has to stay up.  In low range, just barely engaging the hydro was too fast.  The tracks slowed it down enough to make it all work.  Machine had to be hauled everywhere anyway, so it didn't affect travel.  3' a minute at tile depth I think was the needed speed.  Pretty slow.  

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here is an idea, i have not thought this through, probably too fast.   put a small roller chain sprocket on belt pulley shaft (use extension & pillow block ??) put large sprocket on RH brake shaft (where planter drive goes) put trans in neutral, pulley in gear.    might work!

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4 hours ago, Fred B said:

here is an idea, i have not thought this through, probably too fast.   put a small roller chain sprocket on belt pulley shaft (use extension & pillow block ??) put large sprocket on RH brake shaft (where planter drive goes) put trans in neutral, pulley in gear.    might work!

Are the rotation directions correct or would it make it reverse? 

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How slow are you trying to go?

While an original hydracreeper is probably just a pipe dream as they appear to be extremely rare, a little math and some careful shopping should yield a hydraulic motor which you could use to make your own hydracreeper.

You're not going to be pulling a weight sled like this, 5GPM and 1500PSI is only a couple of HP, but if your intention is to pull a small transplanter or run the slow tractor races in the "unlimited" class.

Tire size changes indeed slow the tractor down but only incrementally. To get a 50% reduction in speed you need to have a 50% reduction in tire diameter. A 12.4x36 is 54" in diameter. The belly of the tractor will be dragging on the ground long before you get down to a 27" diameter tire unless you build some drop boxes and chain drive the wheels.

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4 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

How slow are you trying to go?

While an original hydracreeper is probably just a pipe dream as they appear to be extremely rare, a little math and some careful shopping should yield a hydraulic motor which you could use to make your own hydracreeper.

You're not going to be pulling a weight sled like this, 5GPM and 1500PSI is only a couple of HP, but if your intention is to pull a small transplanter or run the slow tractor races in the "unlimited" class.

Tire size changes indeed slow the tractor down but only incrementally. To get a 50% reduction in speed you need to have a 50% reduction in tire diameter. A 12.4x36 is 54" in diameter. The belly of the tractor will be dragging on the ground long before you get down to a 27" diameter tire unless you build some drop boxes and chain drive the wheels.

Circumference being 50% smaller decreases the speed 50% . Diameter would be slightly different

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2 hours ago, bitty said:

Circumference being 50% smaller decreases the speed 50% . Diameter would be slightly different

Circumference is directly proportional to diameter. You're probably thinking of area.

pi * D = C

3.14 * 54" = ~170"

3.14 * 27" = ~85"

85/170 = .5 = 50%

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1 hour ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Circumference is directly proportional to diameter. You're probably thinking of area.

pi * D = C

3.14 * 54" = ~170"

3.14 * 27" = ~85"

85/170 = .5 = 50%

I am mistaken, I thought it wasn't proportional

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9 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

How slow are you trying to go?

While an original hydracreeper is probably just a pipe dream as they appear to be extremely rare, a little math and some careful shopping should yield a hydraulic motor which you could use to make your own hydracreeper.

You're not going to be pulling a weight sled like this, 5GPM and 1500PSI is only a couple of HP, but if your intention is to pull a small transplanter or run the slow tractor races in the "unlimited" class.

Tire size changes indeed slow the tractor down but only incrementally. To get a 50% reduction in speed you need to have a 50% reduction in tire diameter. A 12.4x36 is 54" in diameter. The belly of the tractor will be dragging on the ground long before you get down to a 27" diameter tire unless you build some drop boxes and chain drive the wheels.

I was thinking hand planting seed , this one I’m not sure , combine birds foot trefoils with low cutter bar the angle of cutter had to slow ,first was to fast needed about 3/4 to 1/2 of first 

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2 hours ago, bitty said:

I am mistaken, I thought it wasn't proportional

Doesn't seem like it, though, right? You look at that big 12.4x38 and compare it to a small pickup truck tire and think nah, that can't be half.

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42 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Doesn't seem like it, though, right? You look at that big 12.4x38 and compare it to a small pickup truck tire and think nah, that can't be half.

It is the square area. The thing that was making a me think about it was the fact that when you double the diameter of a pipe you get something like four times the flow

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How about a hydraulic motor chain driving a large sprocket bolted to one of the rear wheels where the wheel weights go. When you are done, pop the master link apart and roll up the chain, then grab a gear and go. 

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9 hours ago, 12_Guy said:

How about a hydraulic motor chain driving a large sprocket bolted to one of the rear wheels where the wheel weights go. When you are done, pop the master link apart and roll up the chain, then grab a gear and go. 

Variation on a theme here, use the motor to back drive the transmission through the PTO or belt pulley like the original hydracreeper does.

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4 hours ago, Matt Kirsch said:

Variation on a theme here, use the motor to back drive the transmission through the PTO or belt pulley like the original hydracreeper does.

My way would allow use of the PTO no? Was thinking one wheel drive for a trencher attachment. 

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