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sandhiller

Old Snowball hit a milestone tonight

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Wanted to catch it at 999999.9 and 1000000 but pics didn't take, too blurry. Oh well. Pretty anticlimactic I guess. On to the next million.

IMG_20200524_203416406.thumb.jpg.db2d8257027f1a9f17fc55006804294f.jpg

IMG_20200311_153102778.thumb.jpg.4889bd9cd4fefb7c0d11680eed5f667a.jpg

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That’s a lot of zeros!

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What ru running for power? 1450 at 70 mph, nice fuel range.

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49 minutes ago, Dasnake said:

What ru running for power? 1450 at 70 mph, nice fuel range.

Series 60 14L set at 490

It is happy there.

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9 hours ago, sandhiller said:

Series 60 14L set at 490

It is happy there.

Those are great engines . 

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How many hours or engine revolutions would you say that has, total?

 

I'm currently having a long running debate in my FD about whether or not an engine NEEDS to be replaced after 20 years. Of course they all think yes, because it's OPM (other people's money) and yet when we remove one from service, other FD's with smaller budgets buy them and run them for a decade or more. I want to make a sound technical argument about why apparatus doesn't need to be replaced every time a good ol' boy wants a new toy.

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22 minutes ago, lorenzo said:

Those are great engines . 

The little Series 60 12.7L had just as must power with better fuel mileage. They have been for the most part trouble free to a million miles. 

But yes the Detroit Series 60 engines were good reliable power. 

I do feel our N14 Red Top (1.1 million miles) runs smoother and has better low end. 

Thinking this 14L is in need of a crank damper. Would smooth it out some. 

I can't back this statement up with hard numbers but I feel when the glider thing was going on, there were more Series 60's put in them then any other motor. 

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42 minutes ago, lorenzo said:

Those are great engines . 

How dare you say that. They are one of the best engines of the time. The Least trouble For the most part.

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6 minutes ago, KWRB said:

How many hours or engine revolutions would you say that has, total?

 

I'm currently having a long running debate in my FD about whether or not an engine NEEDS to be replaced after 20 years. Of course they all think yes, because it's OPM (other people's money) and yet when we remove one from service, other FD's with smaller budgets buy them and run them for a decade or more. I want to make a sound technical argument about why apparatus doesn't need to be replaced every time a good ol' boy wants a new toy.

Dang I just looked the other day and my feeble memory is not bringing it up. 

If I had to guess, it's around 25,000 engine hours. (could be way off)

I will look next time I'm in the truck. I think I actually have a night off. I ran 14 out of the last 15 nights. Took last Thursday off for fire mtg. 

On the FD thing. We run on a very low budget as a VFD. We make our living off other peoples (not good enough anymore equipment). And we need them to be very dependable. 

 

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My truck has 589752 miles and 17689.2 hours. I would guess that the engine has at least twice the hours it shows since it is a 1998 motor. The truck is a 2014. 

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10 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

My truck has 589752 miles and 17689.2 hours. I would guess that the engine has at least twice the hours it shows since it is a 1998 motor. The truck is a 2014. 

Hard to do a miles / hours comparison across trucks and how they are used. 

I don't idle much cept in the winter when I'm unloading. If the engine is running, I'm rolling.  Bulk plants both have their own pumps so I don't need one on the trailer to unload. Truck that has a wet kit and uses it, is going to rack up alot more engine hours in relation to miles. Plus a jillion other factors. 

If my brain worked at all anymore, I"d remember what the hours were when I looked the other day. 

 

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25 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Hard to do a miles / hours comparison across trucks and how they are used. 

I don't idle much cept in the winter when I'm unloading. If the engine is running, I'm rolling.  Bulk plants both have their own pumps so I don't need one on the trailer to unload. Truck that has a wet kit and uses it, is going to rack up alot more engine hours in relation to miles. Plus a jillion other factors. 

If my brain worked at all anymore, I"d remember what the hours were when I looked the other day. 

 

50 miles per engine hour on average for over the Road. 30 miles per engine hour on fleet delivery semis. Truck sales buddy looks at every truck to verify miles and hours. This is as close as it gets on avg.

he always says everyone wants a cat engine , he has sold almost every kind of truck engine combo Detroit is the least troublesome , the red top Cummins sell fast but everyone talks big power cat until they have to pay for it. He sells lots of medium power trucks to for farm use 

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14 minutes ago, dale560 said:

50 miles per engine hour on average for over the Road. 30 miles per engine hour on fleet delivery semis. Truck sales buddy looks at every truck to verify miles and hours. This is as close as it gets on avg.

he always says everyone wants a cat engine , he has sold almost every kind of truck engine combo Detroit is the least troublesome , the red top Cummins sell fast but everyone talks big power cat until they have to pay for it. He sells lots of medium power trucks to for farm use 

My wife works for Cat and I somewhat agree about having a Cat engine, but my little 12.7 Detroit doesn’t do too bad either. It’s a lot more forgiving than the Cat. Mine is set at 500+ and we messed with the torque curve some. Long hard pull and it will heat. 

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2 hours ago, KWRB said:

How many hours or engine revolutions would you say that has, total?

 

I'm currently having a long running debate in my FD about whether or not an engine NEEDS to be replaced after 20 years. Of course they all think yes, because it's OPM (other people's money) and yet when we remove one from service, other FD's with smaller budgets buy them and run them for a decade or more. I want to make a sound technical argument about why apparatus doesn't need to be replaced every time a good ol' boy wants a new toy.

Our oldest truck is a 1944 ford V8 we have a 78 ford cab over, a 76 international 1700 with gas engine,  a 98 international with a T-444e a 92 ford with a cat of some kind. We sold our old tanker 8 years ago with over 300k on a cat 3208 and it’s still being used every day all summer. In the history our department I know of O engine failures either in ours or in any surrounding department. They are always warm when started, as in no sub zero weather, they are always run hard and allowed to get  good operating temp, I see no logical reason to swap an engine at 20 years?!?! That’s the last thing to get problematic on a fire truck. If they need some proof send out oil samples for analysis, that should give a good indication of health. 

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10 minutes ago, Lazy WP said:

My wife works for Cat and I somewhat agree about having a Cat engine, but my little 12.7 Detroit doesn’t do too bad either. It’s a lot more forgiving than the Cat. Mine is set at 500+ and we messed with the torque curve some. Long hard pull and it will heat. 

Maybe if they still built Cat engines, damned emissions laws. A lot of 3406's still in the area ahead of bullracks. Very loyal following. 

Always heard Pittsburgh Power swear that (12.7) is a 600HP engine all day long. 

Not arguing but think that may be asking a bit much. They also want to sell you their radiator too.😁

I always liked the one we had. It pulled well and set at just under 500 ahead of a 13sp, it was nice to drive. Better fuel mileage than the N14. 

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Mine rolled over the million mile mark awhile back to. Impressive to see all those zeros. I'm like you, working on the second one.👍

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On 5/26/2020 at 11:12 AM, KWRB said:

How many hours or engine revolutions would you say that has, total?

My apologies. Forgot to get this to you. My memory is just not good anymore

1,001,346 miles

27,595 hours

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3 hours ago, sandhiller said:

My apologies. Forgot to get this to you. My memory is just not good anymore

1,001,346 miles

27,595 hours

She avg 36.2 miles per hour over her lifetime. Right on avg for fleet trucks 

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On 5/26/2020 at 3:50 PM, vtfireman85 said:

Our oldest truck is a 1944 ford V8 we have a 78 ford cab over, a 76 international 1700 with gas engine,  a 98 international with a T-444e a 92 ford with a cat of some kind. We sold our old tanker 8 years ago with over 300k on a cat 3208 and it’s still being used every day all summer. In the history our department I know of O engine failures either in ours or in any surrounding department. They are always warm when started, as in no sub zero weather, they are always run hard and allowed to get  good operating temp, I see no logical reason to swap an engine at 20 years?!?! That’s the last thing to get problematic on a fire truck. If they need some proof send out oil samples for analysis, that should give a good indication of health. 

when I said "engine", I meant "fire engine".

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1 minute ago, KWRB said:

when I said "engine", I meant "fire engine".

Ahhhhh, that makes more sense, it is regional, here they are trucks or units. Me I would do all I could to avoid teir 4 

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On 5/26/2020 at 1:12 PM, KWRB said:

How many hours or engine revolutions would you say that has, total?

 

I'm currently having a long running debate in my FD about whether or not an engine NEEDS to be replaced after 20 years. Of course they all think yes, because it's OPM (other people's money) and yet when we remove one from service, other FD's with smaller budgets buy them and run them for a decade or more. I want to make a sound technical argument about why apparatus doesn't need to be replaced every time a good ol' boy wants a new toy.

Boy, I'd like to know. I've a 1990 GMC Top Kick fire truck soon to add my 14' dump body to it. Cat 3208 10.6 litre with a bath fan turbo, next to no boost. Odometer reads 36000, pump hours 550. This doesn't add up to a lot of wear, but I presume it was started cold and flogged before oil pressure builds. heated storage is a factor, for better or worse. 

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7 hours ago, KWRB said:

when I said "engine", I meant "fire engine".

BIA and USFS calls them engines too.

Tender is a truck and tanker is airplane

Had to learn their terminology when we started having mutual aid contracts with them.

It's worth it, Gov sure pays well. Really helps out our poor little Vol Dept.

And they get quick response saving a lot of their property so it's a win win

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When I first started in '72, we were given BFD terminology,

Firetruck was called pumper.

Ladder truck was called an aerial.

Equipment truck was just that,

The chiefs vehicle was a Ford station wagon driven by the chief,

There was an old civil defense truck that was manned only for deep bush fires with two gas pumps on the front bumper along with 50' hard suctions for draughting,

When I left in '08 the names and capabilities of all vehicles were vastly changed.

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...great effort  for your old truck......sandhiller. I had hour meters in the Macks    I had...because we did so much off highway   Forestry work...not glamorous....but costs per  hour/mile way less...…...The Macks eventually did  well in excess of 20 thousand hours...…..

As a bit of useless info.....didn't put a picture on the topic of  "Nice looking tractors "...but our old 5130    …..which would never win a beauty comp......turned   11,111 hours   yesterday, whilst feeding out......not pretty.....but been very reliable...that's all you want …..

Mike

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