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White 5100

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My neighbor had one.  I always thought they were built kind of light.  He would break the U bolts that held the wheel/lift assembly to the frame.  I think their metering system is pretty accurate.  Some had v wheel closing wheels like a Deere or Kinze.  Good luck.

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Dads cousin has one, he loves it. I've never personally seen it. Most people I know with a white planter like them.

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4 hours ago, axial_al said:

My neighbor had one.  I always thought they were built kind of light.  He would break the U bolts that held the wheel/lift assembly to the frame.  I think their metering system is pretty accurate.  Some had v wheel closing wheels like a Deere or Kinze.  Good luck.

They used 5/8" bolts. The biggest problem was when a splitter unit got attached. We would die grind out the holes and replace the 5/8" with 3/4" grade 8 bolts. Fixed the problem. The 5100's used 13-1/2" openers. Same as a 400 cylco. The 6100 used 15" like a deere. The main achilles heal was the folding markers on the 8/12 rows. They were built to light.  Over all they are a simple to use accurate planter. 

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1 hour ago, cedar farm said:

They used 5/8" bolts. The biggest problem was when a splitter unit got attached. We would die grind out the holes and replace the 5/8" with 3/4" grade 8 bolts. Fixed the problem. The 5100's used 13-1/2" openers. Same as a 400 cylco. The 6100 used 15" like a deere. The main achilles heal was the folding markers on the 8/12 rows. They were built to light.  Over all they are a simple to use accurate planter. 

X2

i know of a few guys that ran a 5100, and they loved them.  The worst part about them is lack of dealer support in some parts of the country.  If you have an AGCO place nearby, go for it.

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Dad had one. It was a good simple planter. He got as much out of it as he had paid for it when he sold it after 15 or so years and lots of acres. The biggest problem was the fertilizer openers. They were first, before the no-till coulters. In no-till, the opener discs would get damaged by rocks etc. I always thought that if the more robust no-till had been first, the fertilizer discs would have lasted better. They were easy to change. Dad always kept a spare with him. 

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Older gentleman who was a Minni Mo then Agco customer had one since it was new until he passed away. Pulled it with his 955 with bridge hitch because he had a 15' Mckee danish with wire baskets on the 3pt. This was a Deere planter neighborhood back then, and his corn and beans he put out with that White would always emerge a couple days before the Deere planters that planted stuff the same day. I'm talking 4 different guys with Deere planters, so something was special about the White

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I run a 5100 frame with 6100 units. The 5100 has the 13.5” openers which work fine in worked soil but not ideal in no till. I got a good deal on 8 6100 units a few years ago and switched them out and it is a lot better in no till. Great planters with a very simple metering system. 

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Those who use them will probably tell me I'm wrong or at least explain. When I worked in the seed industry I hated White planters. It seemed like people who had them would only accept 48-50# round seed. There's just not much of that certain years or with certain hybrids. I assume they can plant other sizes but it must require changing a disc in the seed meters and that must not be easy based on the demands of people I worked with.

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There were three

57 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

Those who use them will probably tell me I'm wrong or at least explain. When I worked in the seed industry I hated White planters. It seemed like people who had them would only accept 48-50# round seed. There's just not much of that certain years or with certain hybrids. I assume they can plant other sizes but it must require changing a disc in the seed meters and that must not be easy based on the demands of people I worked with.

There were 3 main corn plates we sold. If you didn't own a 1/2 wrench(or turn a wing bolt on 6100) to swap out disc's then I imagine you would hate to stand there and stare at that disc wondering what to do. The JD finger unit could be fussy on the seed shape as well(I have the one dad bought new in the early 80's). Nothing you could do about that. 

The only improvement we did was push to install the IH gauge wheel tires. I had always liked the way they looked not packing the dirt next to the opener. One year I talked a guy into putting 6 rows of them on his 12 row. He claimed the six rows with the IH wheels came up quicker and in bought the other six rows worth. I put them on my 8 row 7000 and I do think the stand was better.

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Can seed delivery get any simpler than a cyclo planter? Fill one hopper, make sure you have air pressure, make sure the drum turns, you're planting corn. That being said I have heard that the white metering system is very accurate but have no experience with them.

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2 hours ago, cedar farm said:

There were three

There were 3 main corn plates we sold. If you didn't own a 1/2 wrench(or turn a wing bolt on 6100) to swap out disc's then I imagine you would hate to stand there and stare at that disc wondering what to do. The JD finger unit could be fussy on the seed shape as well(I have the one dad bought new in the early 80's). Nothing you could do about that. 

The only improvement we did was push to install the IH gauge wheel tires. I had always liked the way they looked not packing the dirt next to the opener. One year I talked a guy into putting 6 rows of them on his 12 row. He claimed the six rows with the IH wheels came up quicker and in bought the other six rows worth. I put them on my 8 row 7000 and I do think the stand was better.

As I said I have never worked with them so don't know what it takes to change seed discs. I just remember that certain guys with White planters were a pain in my butt. Maybe it was just the individuals. They would rather switch hybrids than get anything other than MR seed.

I think the early riser planter units had excellent seed placement. The Cyclo had a very simple metering system. But didn't always deliver the most even spacing. I was around an 500, 800, and 2 955's. By far the most even seed spacing was a 955 parallel fold 12 row. With the seed boxes on the wings the seed tubes were relatively close in length and not any really long. Just my opinion but I think the seed tubes had a lot to do with spacing on the Cyclos. 

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9 minutes ago, IH Forever said:

As I said I have never worked with them so don't know what it takes to change seed discs. I just remember that certain guys with White planters were a pain in my butt. Maybe it was just the individuals. They would rather switch hybrids than get anything other than MR seed.

I think the early riser planter units had excellent seed placement. The Cyclo had a very simple metering system. But didn't always deliver the most even spacing. I was around an 500, 800, and 2 955's. By far the most even seed spacing was a 955 parallel fold 12 row. With the seed boxes on the wings the seed tubes were relatively close in length and not any really long. Just my opinion but I think the seed tubes had a lot to do with spacing on the Cyclos. 

That was an issue with those planters, especially the wider ones. I planted with an 8 row 800 and there was always the delay in the outside rows due to the longer tubes. Our corn was mostly silage so it wasn't as critical as for ripe corn. I did like just tossing a bag in the hopper as needed to finish a field instead of splitting it between hoppers.

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The seed plate is bolted on vertically under the hopper. Remove a cap to drain out the seed left in the hopper and then remove the bolt and plate. Easy. We had plates for corn, beans, and sudan grass. I remember the dealer recommended round seed corn, notice the round pattern? I'm not sure how well they planted flats. 

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I have a 5100 white 6row 30 inch works good run between 3 1/2 to 4 lbs air on it  plants very good run about 3-4 miles an hour make sure your disc measure between 131/8 to 131/2 and it will plant good my seed disc take a 9/16 wrench but it seems to plant good with most seed sizes and yes it dose work better with IH gauge tires

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29 minutes ago, b&c farms said:

I have a 5100 white 6row 30 inch works good run between 3 1/2 to 4 lbs air on it  plants very good run about 3-4 miles an hour make sure your disc measure between 131/8 to 131/2 and it will plant good my seed disc take a 9/16 wrench but it seems to plant good with most seed sizes and yes it dose work better with IH gauge tires

The one I was looking at  has the air gauge. It reads for corn set between 2 and 2.5 . Why do you run higher

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better seed placement also when the seed disk are off check the brushes inside I always take my plates off when I'm done with it for the year

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Have planted with one for hire for a guy who wanted us to use his planter. Not going to get into the good or bad, but we still have a CaseIH planter and it will stay that way. I do know that if one is on auction in our country they are hard pressed to fetch $100 a row.

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I run in the 2 to 2 1/4”s of water pressure on my planter. Much higher and you’ll get quite a few doubles. That’s my experience anyway. Probably depends on how tight all your air hoses are to the meters. I also run a lot of light seed so that makes a difference on pressure. 

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Maybe a little off topic nostalgia. The short hoses for the cyclo's were pre-formed soft. Any size longer they had to be made from a 50 or 100' roll. IH had a special flare tool that looked like a tapered hitch pin with a strap welded on it to hold it down with your feet. You had to heat the end of the hose with a heat gun just right and push it on the lightly oiled pin to flare it. To cool it wouldn't flare. To hot and it would buckle.  I would always add a foot just in case it didn't work the first time and if it did I could shorten it on the other end. If a guy brought in a 12 row worth of hoses you had some work to do.

I should add. Although the markers on the 5100's themselves were a bit light. The sequencing valve to alternate markers was simple and very reliable compared to a 7000 or Cyclo. We had tore down quite a few 4 row 5100's to make splitters. When I added markers to my IH grain drill I used the markers and sequence valve off a 5100. You just plumb it into the lift cylinder system. The faded WFE red paint even matched.

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