Jump to content

May 14th 1985, last IH from Rock Island


BrodyNC
 Share

Recommended Posts

8 minutes ago, Jacka said:

Yes but were they all under Allis Chambers or were they under another name.I was not aware of the other aspects if A.C.. Did these products all have Allis Chambers name on it or another subsidiary.I am not arguing but as far as many different products seen by many on a daily basis with the IH stamp on it,I have yet to see a Allis Chambers pickup.

In a building at work built in 1961; in the basement mechanical room are 2 large  defunct  York compressor units with Allis Chalmers electric motors and some controls marked "Siemens-Allis".

Funny.... In the seventies AC went in a joint venture with Fiat to form Fiat Allis. Now Fiat about owns it all......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/14/2020 at 3:15 PM, drglinski said:

This comes up every May.  Why do we have to keep being reminded of it? One of the worst days in history. 

Pearl Harbor wasn't the greatest day in history either, but we are reminded of it every year. It is so we don't forget, we don't want to forget IH!?

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed, If you listen to Dr. Evil they ran pretty tight on tire deliveries.  Denny has described that process in depth several times.....always like his stories!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

No they built steam and oil engines the size of a 2 story house for ships, factories, and power generation for cities.  I would bet somewhere IH had a factory powered by engines built by AC.  They built generators that went into dams like Hoover dam.  They either built or were a part of development of jet engines and nuclear reactors.  They built flower mills, compressors, turbines, rock crushers, and construction lineup that was more extensive then IH.  There is more stuff that I will look up later. 

    i work at a local powerplant, and we have a ton of Allis pumps still in operation, most of them powered by 300-350 hp electric motors.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Smithsonian had a giant AC steam piston engine from (I think) NYC. The size of a two-story house is right. The thing was really a behemoth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wasn’t Allis-Chalmers also big into machine tooling? I can remember my Dad telling me a story about when the 4/560 tractors were being built at Farmall in the late 1950s, IH supposedly used Allis-Chalmers tooling to build them. Probably an old wives tale, but I suppose it could be true. 
 

As far as SN#4452, I got to drive her at RPRU2014 in Huron thanks to CaseySD. 

600C3C96-ABFB-4A9F-9B36-78B3EECA8780.jpeg

13F7F8C2-EFE7-4F05-8E93-379CC563E310.jpeg

3FEF10F2-3772-467D-890F-D66689A00E39.jpeg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember hearing that Allis-Chalmers had at one time one of the largest foundries in the country. I think this was based upon how large of a single casting could be poured. They were pretty big in all types of electrical equipment. From motors and transformers to high voltage gear and generators in power plants.    

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

No they built steam and oil engines the size of a 2 story house for ships, factories, and power generation for cities.  I would bet somewhere IH had a factory powered by engines built by AC.  They built generators that went into dams like Hoover dam.  They either built or were a part of development of jet engines and nuclear reactors.  They built flower mills, compressors, turbines, rock crushers, and construction lineup that was more extensive then IH.  There is more stuff that I will look up later. 

The trunnions on the rotary kiln I used to work at were AC. Cast right into them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, SDman said:

Wasn’t Allis-Chalmers also big into machine tooling? I can remember my Dad telling me a story about when the 4/560 tractors were being built at Farmall in the late 1950s, IH supposedly used Allis-Chalmers tooling to build them. Probably an old wives tale, but I suppose it could be true. 
 

As far as SN#4452, I got to drive her at RPRU2014 in Huron thanks to CaseySD. 

600C3C96-ABFB-4A9F-9B36-78B3EECA8780.jpeg

13F7F8C2-EFE7-4F05-8E93-379CC563E310.jpeg

3FEF10F2-3772-467D-890F-D66689A00E39.jpeg

  I cant tell in the picture, how many hours are on it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Seems like it had 56-57 hrs on IIRC. I remember seeing that tractor in Racine in the mid 1990s when Case had it in storage  at the Training Center...it didn’t have the dash plugged in...it was laying in a box on the cab floor. Sure wouldn’t think those hours are actual by any means. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jacka said:

Yes but were they all under Allis Chambers or were they under another name.I was not aware of the other aspects of A.C.. Did these products all have Allis Chambers name on it or another subsidiary.I am not arguing but as far as many different products seen by many on a daily basis with the IH stamp on it,I have yet to see a Allis Chambers pickup.

I've got transformers in my plant now that say Allis Chalmers on the tag.  I've seen AC pumps and electric motors as well at my former plant.  When we bought our house, I found what looks like a granite or maybe bakelite vault cover with a brass AC tag.  Kinda cool since I'm an AC nut too.  I've got CH Wendell's book about the history of AC.  They were big into power generation, hydroelectric turbines, construction equipment, everything but vehicles and refrigerators as you pointed out.  I think that's where the comment about the world's largest foundry came from.  If they had focused on farm equipment they may have lasted longer.  Management was their downfall, just like IH. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Jacka said:

Yes but were they all under Allis Chambers or were they under another name.I was not aware of the other aspects of A.C.. Did these products all have Allis Chambers name on it or another subsidiary.I am not arguing but as far as many different products seen by many on a daily basis with the IH stamp on it,I have yet to see a Allis Chambers pickup.

I think all the replies since this post answered your question.  Who cares if they didn’t make a pickup.  AC had an impact on more of the daily lives of the general population then any other Ag company.  I think I read somewhere that a generator built by AC in 1965 is still powering part of New York City.  That is just one example.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

I think all the replies since this post answered your question.  Who cares if they didn’t make a pickup.  AC had an impact on more of the daily lives of the general population then any other Ag company.  I think I read somewhere that a generator built by AC in 1965 is still powering part of New York City.  That is just one example.

Wasn't a question at all was a statement.I acknowledged that you brought out what A.C. built and quite frankly I didn't know. Mine was the fact that no company built as many products,vastly differant products with International Harvester as the sole company name on it as IH did.They were in use and bought by everyday people all over the world. I will look for that cab over freight truck with the big A.C. stamped on the hood next time down the interstate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A/C is no longer just like Owatonna, Farmhand, Glencoe, Oliver, Moline, Ford farm equipment, etc etc etc. Sign of hard times. None of them produced freezers and refrigerators, trucks of sorts, but still had decent products. IH had too many irons in the fire and not enough money spent on new developments. Example, 22 year old designed drivetrain behind a gas or diesel engine from 1963-1985 from the 706s-3688s.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

FYI.....the tires were never changed.....the serial number tag was switched by a disgruntled employee with the previous 5488 that was supposed to go to a buyer from the south that wanted the last tractor off the line that was sold to the public. This was told to me years ago by an employee that was witness to the whole deal and i have a feeling now he was more involved than he had first told me. Unfortunately he passed a few years ago. Next time you get a chance to see the tractor in person look closely at the tag. It has damage and the rivet heads are flat from being driven back in with a hammer. So someone needs to locate the previous 5488 off the line -its the real FINAL TRACTOR.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, ihcbill said:

FYI.....the tires were never changed.....the serial number tag was switched by a disgruntled employee with the previous 5488 that was supposed to go to a buyer from the south that wanted the last tractor off the line that was sold to the public. This was told to me years ago by an employee that was witness to the whole deal and i have a feeling now he was more involved than he had first told me. Unfortunately he passed a few years ago. Next time you get a chance to see the tractor in person look closely at the tag. It has damage and the rivet heads are flat from being driven back in with a hammer. So someone needs to locate the previous 5488 off the line -its the real FINAL TRACTOR.

WHOA!!! Scandal!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, ihcbill said:

FYI.....the tires were never changed.....the serial number tag was switched by a disgruntled employee with the previous 5488 that was supposed to go to a buyer from the south that wanted the last tractor off the line that was sold to the public. This was told to me years ago by an employee that was witness to the whole deal and i have a feeling now he was more involved than he had first told me. Unfortunately he passed a few years ago. Next time you get a chance to see the tractor in person look closely at the tag. It has damage and the rivet heads are flat from being driven back in with a hammer. So someone needs to locate the previous 5488 off the line -its the real FINAL TRACTOR.

My 2 cents, so not worth that.

If the serial numbers had gotten changed like they said, and serial #4451 was the actual last tractor built which resides in Tennessee or Kentucky, that gentleman who owns that tractor can claim he owns the last one but paper work and serial number plate will never prove that theory.  I have seen the photos of the tractors coming down the line and obviously there was no order in which they were built, there's a handful of them behind the actual last 5488 still on the line, maybe another model I don't know, wasn't there. But the tractor with tag is going to be the last.  Only other way would be to match engine serial with chassis or cab serial number, but were those records kept?  No one will never know or some one may have to find 4451.

For thought:. 4451 sitting in controlled environment, Rice and Cane tires, looks as it did when it rolled off the line but has 3 shades of red paint.  Tractor has be somewhere!????.

Like I said, my 2 ¢¢.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, IHC5488 said:

My 2 cents, so not worth that.

If the serial numbers had gotten changed like they said, and serial #4451 was the actual last tractor built which resides in Tennessee or Kentucky, that gentleman who owns that tractor can claim he owns the last one but paper work and serial number plate will never prove that theory.  I have seen the photos of the tractors coming down the line and obviously there was no order in which they were built, there's a handful of them behind the actual last 5488 still on the line, maybe another model I don't know, wasn't there. But the tractor with tag is going to be the last.  Only other way would be to match engine serial with chassis or cab serial number, but were those records kept?  No one will never know or some one may have to find 4451.

For thought:. 4451 sitting in controlled environment, Rice and Cane tires, looks as it did when it rolled off the line but has 3 shades of red paint.  Tractor has be somewhere!????.

Like I said, my 2 ¢¢.

 

 

Budd Yule tried to say the last one was actually a 5088?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not to open up another can of worms but if there is a little bit of controversy over the what as the last IH tractor made which should have been easy enough to figure out, then how did IH nail down the exact 5 millionth tractor.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2020 at 3:01 AM, Jacka said:

Wasn't a question at all was a statement.I acknowledged that you brought out what A.C. built and quite frankly I didn't know. Mine was the fact that no company built as many products,vastly differant products with International Harvester as the sole company name on it as IH did.They were in use and bought by everyday people all over the world. I will look for that cab over freight truck with the big A.C. stamped on the hood next time down the interstate.

Go buy CH Wendel's Allis Chalmers book.  Its a good read AC built just as many different products with their name on them as IH.  In fact 1979 IH had 41 total factories while AC had 71 factories.  You sound like you weren't even born when AC was still in business.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting story on the last tractor, I've never heard that before. 

On A.C. there was part of an old documentary on the Allis Works on YouTube a few years back. Discussed a load of the massive projects that were done there such as dam turbines and dynamo generators. Had interviews with former employees who worked there and a lot of historical photos / footage. I have tried to dig up the video a few times and have never been able to find it again.

A good example of AC equipment is in the engine house at the Soudan Underground Mine in Northern MN. The original Allis electric motor, reduction drive and winch still run the lift you ride down to the mine tunnels. I was talking to the operator, he claimed they use $20 electricity for every cycle of running the drift cars up/down...... mine engine house...

https://youtu.be/0j9lNpdN1s8

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, IHC5488 said:

.  Only other way would be to match engine serial with chassis or cab serial number, but were those records kept?  

 

 

Matt, I pulled this off of Machinery Pete’s page last week. The watermark appears to be from Heritage Iron, so I should give credit where it’s due. It’s got the engine serial # for #4452 listed. Should help clear this up...or maybe not. 

578CFD8D-9CB0-461F-82E9-E06865314007.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...