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On 5/8/2020 at 8:43 AM, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Thanks Danny, that's what I was hoping to hear. I can deal with a little extra, just wasn't looking forward to splitting this machine again. Two years ago I had it apart, completely destroyed the constant mesh gears and broke the bottom trans shaft in half. I installed one that measured a little thicker from the salvage yard to avoid these problems. Would it be worth while to needle the diff while I have it out? 

If you have it out and are willing to spend a bit more money YES by all means needle the rear ,,, you wont be sorry.   Yes its a tractor pulling thing BUT newer tractors come factory needled

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2 hours ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Looks like case ih has new case ih parts available. The cross shaft and the bevel gears. Like jmech said, they are listed for all models. 

More that likely your going to need a new brake pinion shaft on the right side as well, along with a bunch of bearings. 

If you are planning to do this yourself, this is a very big job. You have to pull the fuel tanks, rear rockshaft cover, PTO, both axles and brakes.  Then spend hours flushing the metal out of the rear end housing.  You have to have the tools to reset back up the ring and pinion gears, and preload the bearings.  Like I said, pretty big job.  

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19 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Hmm... Did not know about the special tools. Could you elaborate any?

Do you have an 86 series chassis service manual? 

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22 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Hmm... Did not know about the special tools. Could you elaborate any?

Hammer, screw driver and pry bar. That should get a good response. If you don’t pull the pinion you don’t need to set pinion depth. You can adjust backlash but on a used gear don’t do to much adjusting. Keep shims and caps from side to side together. A dial indicator to check back lash. I always use my hand and and feel, listen to gear. Seriously I always set backlash by hand , for the naysayers you can check it be spot on.

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If you have not had any experience with this sort of drivetrain work, your best bet might be to do the "grunt work".......pressure washing, fuel tank removal, tear down, clean up, swap out non critical parts and then get someone with some experience to help with the more technical aspects of the job. Be sure to get them involved before you have it all torn down, so they have some input into the teardown and organization of parts.  As mentioned above keeping track of the location of the various shim packs as well as all the parts big and small can simplify reassembly. 

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We don't have any special tools either. If you are mechanically inclined and understand things you can do it. All the ones we have done seem to be more quiet when we are finished with them too. Some of those rear ends really sing from the factory and some are nice and quiet. Pretty sure there were guys at the factory better at installation than others. As J Mech said it is a big job, but doable.

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I can handle most jobs. Done the trans on it, have a dial indicator, and have the blue ribbon manuals from peaceful creak. I've done semi truck rear ends before, and wouldn't imagine this one to be much harder. I do remember a tool used to spread something, I read it a while back, don't quite remember what it was. I'll do a little more reading and make a decision. I have a friend who used to work at a case ih dealership in the early nineties. 

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7 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

I can handle most jobs. Done the trans on it, have a dial indicator, and have the blue ribbon manuals from peaceful creak. I've done semi truck rear ends before, and wouldn't imagine this one to be much harder. I do remember a tool used to spread something, I read it a while back, don't quite remember what it was. I'll do a little more reading and make a decision. I have a friend who used to work at a case ih dealership in the early nineties. 

You can handle it. Pull it apart and look what it needs.

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19 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

I can handle most jobs. Done the trans on it, have a dial indicator, and have the blue ribbon manuals from peaceful creak. I've done semi truck rear ends before, and wouldn't imagine this one to be much harder. I do remember a tool used to spread something, I read it a while back, don't quite remember what it was. I'll do a little more reading and make a decision. I have a friend who used to work at a case ih dealership in the early nineties. 

When you say semi rear ends, do you mean rebuilding them? Or just pulling out the assembly and bolting in a rebuilt diff?  Semi rear ends used loaded assemblies.

Definitely need a dial indicator.

No spreader bar needed on a tractor rear end, only on axle differentials such as Dan 44, 60, 70 ect.  Even on those, a good tool, but not a required one.

You can probably handle it, but might give your buddy a call.  Big thing is how to handle the tires and axles.  I use big homemade dolly's that you set the whole wheel assemblies on, axle and all, and roll it apart.  Don't even have to take the duals off.  Easy to build them, and it saves 4 or 5 hours labor taking all the wheels and hubs off. 

Going to need cab stands.  I built my own also. 

Go get the book and read through it to see what your getting into. It's about the biggest job you can do to an 86 series. Gets worse if the pinion is bad and you have to pull the rear housing after doing all I mentioned above.  This job takes a week (40 hours) or more in a well equipped shop, and that's if you don't have to pull the pinion. 

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Rebuild semi rear ends, is what I meant. Setting up pinion depth, contact, and etc. Using paint, or grease to make sure using good contact. I'm probably not the best, but could stand to hold my own if need be. Have cab stands, and actual stand from retired international dealership that holds up rear ends and cabs. I'll have to figure out something for the axle pulling. I'll have to remove duals to minimize footprint in shop, it's full of, well, mostly crap 😅.

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2 minutes ago, MinnesotaFarmall said:

Rebuild semi rear ends, is what I meant. Setting up pinion depth, contact, and etc. Using paint, or grease to make sure using good contact. I'm probably not the best, but could stand to hold my own if need be. Have cab stands, and actual stand from retired international dealership that holds up rear ends and cabs. I'll have to figure out something for the axle pulling. I'll have to remove duals to minimize footprint in shop, it's full of, well, mostly crap 😅.

You don’t find a lot of people that rebuild gear sets. I Have done lots of them also.

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20 minutes ago, dale560 said:

You don’t find a lot of people that rebuild gear sets. I Have done lots of them also.

We know, we know.....

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On 1/17/2021 at 2:36 AM, Killer Red Mater said:

If you have it out and are willing to spend a bit more money YES by all means needle the rear ,,, you wont be sorry.   Yes its a tractor pulling thing BUT newer tractors come factory needled

I've found your topic from 2008 where you've machined the original cross down to accept the needles. But has anyone taken it further and hardened the cross afterwards ?

I see aftermarket crosses with needles advertised on the internet, but can't really find any that says "hardend" ?

 

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There was a fella on here from virgina but was originally from here Madison,Ne (he raised buffalo I think) Anyway his 1486 wrecked the diff and I tried to walk him thru the process BUT all the machine shops near him had a big issue with the mods soooooooooooooo since he needed a new diff housing anyway he bought one here , I needled it and assembled what I could here , drilled the bull pinion and put the swivel on .   Then the parts supplier here shipped it to him.  As far as I know he is still going strong with it. This was done a long time ago already

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7 minutes ago, Killer Red Mater said:

I needled it and assembled what I could here , drilled the bull pinion and put the swivel on . 

No idea what you're talking about. 

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Pressure lubing the the inside of the differential. Would be just about impossible on a 15. Altogether I have heard of drilling the axle housing and pressure lubing the outer bull pinion shaft bearing. Especially the left side one. 

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25 minutes ago, 5488ih said:

Pressure lubing the the inside of the differential. Would be just about impossible on a 15. Altogether I have heard of drilling the axle housing and pressure lubing the outer bull pinion shaft bearing. Especially the left side one. 

I think you mean the right side bull pinion and carrier bearing.  Left side is lubed on a 15.  Oil goes in the left, through the diff and out into the right side.  It almost always takes out the right carrier and bull pinion when the cross goes on a 15. That's where all the metal goes. 

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No, I mean the left outer bull pinion shaft bearing. Not the differential carrier bearing. The one they updated. That one that never gets any oil. Especially the left one. When plowing, in furrow.

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Pic of the opposite side. No matter. The bearing that goes in the backside of the brake/ planetary housing.

2AAA8C3E-64F5-4FD7-8D5D-AA312A7FF1B9.jpeg

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15 hours ago, Killer Red Mater said:

There was a fella on here from virgina but was originally from here Madison,Ne (he raised buffalo I think) Anyway his 1486 wrecked the diff and I tried to walk him thru the process BUT all the machine shops near him had a big issue with the mods soooooooooooooo since he needed a new diff housing anyway he bought one here , I needled it and assembled what I could here , drilled the bull pinion and put the swivel on .   Then the parts supplier here shipped it to him.  As far as I know he is still going strong with it. This was done a long time ago already

So the thing about a hardened cross is mostly in my head ? Not necessarily a must.                  Although I would feel more comfortable knowing that cross and gear surface was the same strength.

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Been looking for this piece forever. Posted it years back. Thought it would be fun to see again.

CCA50121-7849-4055-BCD2-3B614C0CA8F7.jpeg

9D2E652B-AA15-43B5-92B7-7B99B24E6DBB.jpeg

B41D3B76-9CEA-4C94-B07D-E8265AF13921.jpeg

1A1DB5EB-C32A-4148-9FC6-5A8A594FE8B6.jpeg

122751B5-A3F9-47CF-9EEF-6DE74FA31B31.jpeg

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