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1964 farmall 806 front end


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I'm doing some service work on my 806 gas tractor front end, new rims & tires, bearing & seals, the tie rods need to be tighten up inside. So I have a question? is this the front end for the tractor, 6 bolt rims, it seems light, I had a guy tell me that was not the front end that came with the tractor. The bearings I ordered from all states AG are the same sizes for the 6 bolt hub,  So what is this?

 

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The schwartz wide front axle used the IH hubs/bearings. The older ones used on M-450 you ordered the axle specifically for them as they used larger bearings than the 560-86 series. The last few I sold, you could only order the heavy duty assembly with hubs. Those were the 6 bolt hubs and used the 560-86 series bearings. I sold one to a guy with a Super M and he used six bolt rims from a 706 or something like it. Those pictures look like the "heavy duty" unit.

I never would have pushed one on someone with a WL-42 Westendorf with an 8' bucket. But for safety over a narrow front they were a descent axle.

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16 hours ago, Little Red said:

Be careful, the way you have the front of that tractor supported scares me!

But he's superman! 

Yeah... I wouldn't get next to it, let alone work on it jacked up and supported that way.  Accident waiting to happen. 

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Ok It's a Schwartz 🙂😎 I did not see any I-H numbers on the hubs, probability started with a narrow front,  but it has deluxe feeders?

thanks for the info

safety first

 

 

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Tractor probably had a narrow front from the factory. Narrow fronts were more common at the beginning of production.

6 bolt hubs are plenty strong too and just as common as 8 bolt hubs on these. An 8 bolt hub does not make the spindle any heavier, BTW.

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7 hours ago, J-Mech said:

But he's superman! 

Yeah... I wouldn't get next to it, let alone work on it jacked up and supported that way.  Accident waiting to happen. 

That might be Superman’s cryptonite if it lands on his toes

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8 minutes ago, Matt Kirsch said:

It's safer than the typical way one of those is jacked up:

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I'm not sure I agree.... Looks about the same. 

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2 hours ago, superman said:

safety first

 

 

If safety was first it would be on concrete with jack stands.  Or at the very least solid gravel. At the very, very least, one wheel at a time to minimize potential problems. 

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A guy I used to work with was doing brakes on a hopper bottom, took all the wheels off and had it setting on jack stands on the driveway. Changed shoes, drums and s-cams when he went to put the first set of wheels on he must have bumped the axle with the wheel and jack stands sank/twisted/gave out and the trailer came crashing down! Luckily he wasn’t hurt

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1 minute ago, Little Red said:

A guy I used to work with was doing brakes on a hopper bottom, took all the wheels off and had it setting on jack stands on the driveway. Changed shoes, drums and s-cams when he went to put the first set of wheels on he must have bumped the axle with the wheel and jack stands sank/twisted/gave out and the trailer came crashing down! Luckily he wasn’t hurt

Jack stands on gravel are not safe unless you put a piece of plate steel under them.  Same on asphalt. 

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One of the mechanics in shop had an L553 New holland up in the air. All four wheels were off. He had two jack stands in the back and a floor jack in the front. He went underneath to drop the skid plate. We heard a crash and the skid loader was flat on him. They got it jacked up and slid him out. A bunch of broken ribs and a broken neck. He had one of those neck halo's on for months. They think the floor jack went down and it slid off the stands.

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No replacements for good solid railroad tie & 6x6 blocking.  Even jackstands can sink and tip.  Put down a couple 4' pieces of railroad tie, and a  6x6 block across them on top, and very unlikely to tip over.  Sure wish I always took the time to do this....   

Yeah, I know, "posted a picture of what I was working on, and all they talk about is rant about my tree stump blocks...."  But we just want to keep everybody safe!   If we KEEP reminding each other, maybe it will save somebody a painful experience.....maybe myself.

Cedar - Wow, thats a sad story.   Very glad he made it out! 

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Wow......the skidsteer must have -luckily- still been held up a bit by the collapsed jack. That's terrible.

I dropped my fathers first nice pickup when I was probably 13-14yrs old and doing a tire rotation. Long box ext cab f250 diesel on two Jack stands and two floor jacks.....on gravel. Wanted to wash backsides of rims over by the hydrant all at once. Was wresting first wheel back on and something kicked out and the whole truck went down. Rotors and drums into the gravel. And our only two jacks were kinda pinched under there. I got a bottle jack under the plow frame, on a 6x6, never pumped so fast in my life. (All wheels back on before anybody seen it). I've not had all four wheels of a vehicle off at once since.  I actually made squares out of double 3/4 plywood to support my Jack stands and jacks when rotating tires on blacktop  but I try to stay on conrete best I can.  

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It made him a better person and he was the 1st to say it. He had an attitude, chip on his shoulder. He said it gave him a new lease on life and to appreciate it. Couldn't find a nicer guy now.

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that's the standard Schwartz wide front for a 560 on up IH also worked on a 460 -656 if equipped with the heavy hubs. The heavy duty series used a reinforced center section and the spindles were constructed differently

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