Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I had purchased this dozer in 2015 to do a 6 acre project on my property. I really like the machine and it was in a condition that it could be made to work well again. It has the big transmission. The transmission and torque converter are solid.  I thought I would share a couple pictures of my TD7E dozer that I spent a few months working on this past winter. Along with this I wanted to share a few issues I had.  It had several issues that I have resolved. It started with the steering system not working. About a year and a half ago I had all the pads relined. I also replaced one side clutch and brake discs due to them being warped. 

About a year later I was working on a different project and there was a crunch from the gear box and it was stuck on the side of a hill frozer. I pulled back on the steering levers so the tracks would move while it was towed back to the shop and I checked out the damages. I found that one side planetary gear had fallen off the cage and went through the main carrier. Everything in the gear box had been damaged or destroyed. I was able to scrounge together the necessary parts and completely rebuilt the gear box. The most difficult part to find ended up being the needle bearings for the planetary gears. I bought the remainder of Komatsu's supply. After an exhaustive search I ended up getting the right diameter bearings and cutting 120 of them to size myself. Everything went back together. Since the tracks were split and the machine dismantled I decided to grind the remaining paint and give it a new coat and put the machine back together.

Another major issue I had was the valve rocker assembly bearings were so loose that the valve cover would fill up with oil and the vent tube would drain oil. About a gallon an hour. At this point I decided to rebuild the engine. I identified the engine as a "newer" style engine by the 3 cam shaft bearings and clamp style injectors. This is important to know when ordering some of the parts.

I drained all the fluids and pulled the engine/converter. Took about 6 hours. I stripped the engine down and did a major rebuild. All new cam and crank bearings. I installed a remanufactured head, injection pump, and injectors. I installed a new cam and crankshaft. The crankshaft required the installation of a new pinion gear which requires you to heat up the gear and slide it on the crank snout. I installed a used good rocker assembly. I attempted to replaced the oil pump but the reliance part number that was supposed to work with this machine and engine didn't. The tube inserts where shallower and it did not work with the pickup tube. The balancer is also discontinued and a replacement is not available. My oil pump and balancer were fine so I continued the job with them. The balancer had to be installed with the engine upright with #2 cylinder at top dead center. The reason for this is because the new gear on the crank did not have a timing mark so the only way to time the balancer was to have the cylinder up and the balancer gears at a gravity relaxed position and bolted on. The timing for the rest of the engine was easy because you only needed to line up the marks. So everything was timed before the engine was installed. I modified a IH tractor exhaust manifold to fit the dozer. I also replaced the exhaust channel tube with a new one for a IH tractor and brazed a tube on the outside for the TD7E muffler connection. This saved me several hundred dollars because the tractor parts are much cheaper and more available. I installed a new muffler. I got rid of the original style fuel filters and custom installed spin on filters.

During this time I also rebuilt 3 hydraulic cylinders. Replaced all the bushings and pins. My bushing were still tight in the bore but not as tight as I felt they should be so I did braze a couple spots on them to make sure they don't spin. I completely custom made and brazed together the front hydraulic lines since they were completely mangled and caused repeat leaks from not being properly secured. Replaced all the power shift hydraulic hoses and oil cooler lines. Secured all the rubber hydraulic lines. Replaced the main blade up and down hydraulic spool with a used one since there were parts missing in mine and it always stuck. Restored the hydraulic tank sight glass. Installed a new hour meter and relay. Installed a new driveshaft u-joint.

I put everything back together and gave it a test run. Right away two of the injectors leaked. I had gotten two reman injectors and two new injectors from the supplier. The new injectors both leaked from the top connection. I called the company and they sent out four new injectors. All four leak again. We determined that whoever made these didn't make the top bevel correctly. They found two original injectors rebuilt them and sent them over. Now none leaked. I did however develop leaks on both of them during break in around the rubber oring indication the connection was leaking by in the sleeve. I'm still working to resolve that. The head was supposed to have new inserts so I didn't think this would be a problem and I'm not sure why the issue is occurring. 

Other than that I had no issues after working if for several hours and no other leaks. The biggest difference is the play in the blade is gone with the new bushings and pins. This makes grading so much easier and faster since your not dealing with the blade up and down movement. It took about two months to complete this job but I enjoyed it and learned a good deal. International put a lot of thought in to the design of these machines and it shows when you start working on it. The machines functions well and it is relatively simple which is the trademark of a good machine. 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_6884.jpg

IMG_6885.jpg

IMG_6886.jpg

IMG_6645.jpg

IMG_6649.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a fine looking dozer, It should serve you well for many yrs to come.

Very nice work!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Outstanding job.  I cant imagine there are many around looking like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the compliments. I wanted to post it on here because I used this forum often during the process and I really appreciate the wealth of knowledge people are willing to share!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are a good dozer, and you did a real nice job on your restoration! It should serve you well for your projects. One word of advice would be to take a little tension off the tracks, they appear to be pretty tight, unless you just made a turn before you took the picture. Being too tight puts a lot of strain on the idlers and pins, they should have about 2" of sag if you were to lay a straightedge from the front idler to the carrier roller.

Ross

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, RBootsMI said:

Those are a good dozer, and you did a real nice job on your restoration! It should serve you well for your projects. One word of advice would be to take a little tension off the tracks, they appear to be pretty tight, unless you just made a turn before you took the picture. Being too tight puts a lot of strain on the idlers and pins, they should have about 2" of sag if you were to lay a straightedge from the front idler to the carrier roller.

Ross

Thanks Ross I’ll loosen them up a little. Does anyone know how to get oil in these aftermarket berco top track rollers. They are of the same design except there’s no fill hole on top just in the front center. I tried pumping oil in but it won’t get past the thrust washer. All you can do is fill it up to the bottom cover and slide it on but it’s not up to the center of the idler then. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Ihtd7e1976 said:

Thanks Ross I’ll loosen them up a little. Does anyone know how to get oil in these aftermarket berco top track rollers. They are of the same design except there’s no fill hole on top just in the front center. I tried pumping oil in but it won’t get past the thrust washer. All you can do is fill it up to the bottom cover and slide it on but it’s not up to the center of the idler then. 

Well, I'm not sure for the regular person, but when used to work at the dealer, we had a vacuum/oil gun to fill things like that and lubed pin&bushing kits. It was a tank full of oil, air operated, bunch of hoses, with a gun with a rubber tipped nozzle and 2 buttons and a vac/pressure gauge on it. You would stick the nozzle in the hole and hold one button down to pull a vacuum on whatever you were working in. I don't remember the range, but you'd pull it down, let it set a few seconds and make sure the gauge didn't lose vacuum, then squeeze the other button and it would flow pressurized oil out of the nozzle, the vacuum would pull it into whatever you were filling. Now, I don't remember how yours would be attached to the carrier tower, bolts??, but the way to do the JD ones that had the shaft pressed into the carrier tower was to get all the seals in place, and before you put the outer cap on the roller, you would slide the roller itself out on the shaft a little bit so you could just fill the roller cavity with oil, then slide the roller back all the way onto the shaft, put the retainer bolts into it, and bolt the cover back on. You would do that with it standing up, just like it is when it's mounted on the machine. Probably doesn't really make much sense of how I described it, but it's easier to do than describe when you've done it hundreds of times. There really isn't that much oil in there, usually as long as the cavity in the roller is 1/3 full, that's plenty. If you decide to do it the way I described, make sure you don't get any dirt in the steel pieces on the seal on the back of it. Most of those have the 2 piece precision ground steel / rubber seal in them. The only thing that seals the oil in it is the PERFECT grind on the faces of the 2 steel rings, one piece of dirt between them and they'll leak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info. How you describe it for the jd is the method I used. Slid the roller on partially filled it up until it ran out the front cover than slid it on all the way and put the front cover on. This seems to be the only way. Even with an oil pump the front cover seal blows out before oil gets to the main roller cavity. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That thing is gorgeous!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love a TD8 ,grew up around them and 7's .But everyone I find is just junk here in NY. Dad is 78 and still runs a dozer and TrackHoe daily for the neighbor . He has a 450,650 ,and 41 Komatsu so we don't really need our own .We use them for free.. lol. Very nice work great to see it saved

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the kind words. What makes the machine so nice is its size to power ratio. I've had a lot of projects that would very difficult to get a bigger machine in and this did the job perfectly. You can also do larger projects with it no problem just takes a little longer. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...