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Shop Ideas ??? Help ??

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I going to build a new shop 32 ft by 48 ft by 16 ft high 12 ft by 48 ft will be machine shop and 20 ft by 48 ft will be cold storage.  In May and need ideas of what . Kind of Air compressor piping to do ?  What to bury in concrete floor beams / hooks / etc... To hook things too to straighten out things. Any ideas for inside shop will help ? I do a lot of welding in it too.   Thanks Dave

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Air - Rapid-air system.   Make it bigger and nicer then you think you will ever need, and then maybe you will have 2-3 years before you outgrow it. 

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dont know your placement of doors....

are you goin deep/wide enough to close doors and have 2-3 projects + all the tools junk around?

most equip is either 10-14' wide or 16-'20' long

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12 foot wide is awful small for a machine shop. Whats your budget?

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I've never heard anyone regret putting in hot water in-floor heat in a shop.  Insulating the shop portion is something that will pay you back every day from about Halloween to Easter.  Even if the furnace doesn't run. My shop 24x36 stays warm enough to work in lots of times without running the heater.  Before I insulated I had to run the heater much more often.  Even on hot muggy summer days, keep the shop doors closed and the shop stays cool enough to work in.

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Just now, DOCTOR EVIL said:

I've never heard anyone regret putting in hot water in-floor heat in a shop.  Insulating the shop portion is something that will pay you back every day from about Halloween to Easter.  Even if the furnace doesn't run. My shop 24x36 stays warm enough to work in lots of times without running the heater.  Before I insulated I had to run the heater much more often.  Even on hot muggy summer days, keep the shop doors closed and the shop stays cool enough to work in.

proper insulation, in floor heating is the best route,(from multiple experiences) but OP mentioned wanting to pre set  clamps and add a lot of holes in those areas.

at least from here it sounds TOO small and needs more planning  to expand later.

40 wide ,long as budget allows.....come back in  year and start a floor heated 30/40 shop with expansion of rough work/clamps into the unheated then add/repeat as need /budget permits

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I installed 1/2 pex with two 50' hose reels on each end of the 40 x 40 shop. My ceiling is 14' with white liner steel. I mounted them at 10 feet so they are not in the way. I put my air compressor in a separate room that is heated 24-7. On my compressor I removed the 1/4 line from the pump head to the tank and ran soft copper to an after cooler and then to  horizontal copper then to the tank. I get almost zero water in my tank. My plasma cutter works so much better because of the drier air.  Its a  single stage compressor from Manards. Temps at the pump head after running wide open for 3 min is around 300 deg. Temps after it comes out of the after cooler are around 79 deg. Most of the water is caught a the first drop leg. 

I heat my shop with wood because I have lots of it available on my property. I also don't want a $150 a month heating bill as we don't have natural gas. Just electric or propane. I did not put pipe in for floor heat. It works well for us, individual results may very. 

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Since switching to cordless tools. Having a maze of air lines for convenient air outlets around the shop is less of a concern for me. 

I use the air compressor for airing up tires, blowing out radiators and the plasma cutter. That can all be done by the front door where the compressor is located.

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32 ft by 48 ft shop is all township would allow without a variance and . I dont farm just restore tractors and work on cars. And heat will be with overhead Reznor heater . NO in floor heat takes too long to warm up shop with those and need to bolt machines down so NO in floor heat.... Too much crap with them. Still need other ideas ????  Keep them coming !!!

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I would forget about having cold storage and just insulate entire building. You are in Midwest? You should be able to comfortably heat entire building for a 1000 a winter

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9 minutes ago, Whats in the barn ? said:

32 ft by 48 ft shop is all township would allow without a variance and . I dont farm just restore tractors and work on cars. And heat will be with overhead Reznor heater . NO in floor heat takes too long to warm up shop with those and need to bolt machines down so NO in floor heat.... Too much crap with them. Still need other ideas ????  Keep them coming !!!

You posted same time as I posted. Your size is perfect just insulate entire building even if you want to partition a spot off for machine shop.

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Going to insulate entire building just need any other ideas ?????

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ok so very similar shop sizes for you/me

workshop side for me is 15x40 - sloped ceiling from 8 to 12 foot - use window AC in summer to cool - use small electric heater set at 48 degrees to keep the chill off and liquids from freezing and then turn on the supplemental clothes dryer to warm things up to work to 60degrees in about 30 mins - 

dryer was FREE - little 220v heater with thermostat was 40 bucks on CL

spend your money on battery milwaukee tools unless you have the Air Compressor already adn all the lines etc..........you wont regret it and dont have to fool with all teh air crap short of airing up a bad tire or something out of the ordinary. You can buy every battery tool needed for mechanic work impact/rachets w/out the large expense of air system setup and have $$ left over. 

i use a roll around compressor 90% of teh time now for everything. IF you already have your BIG compressor and tools and paint with it, pex is an easy way to go for teh air lines. They make pex for air lines. 

rollup doors with openers a must, good lights a must, make sure you have plenty of power for welding/machines etc........100amp box minimum with 220V

internet is a must these days so plan for an inside booster because metal blocks wifi and cell signal bad

comfortable chair, big clock on wall to see ata distance while working so you dont get in trouble from mama, work benches for standing or sitting while working, rubber floor mats in front of them, good bench lighting to see when working, the older you get the more light it takes

mini fridge for water, laptop or ipad something for the barn, TV optional ( rabbit ears do not work in metal buildings ) need external antenna

i had a bathroom and hot water but since enclosed it made an office then decided to turn it into a mini apartment and rent it out 

good outside lighting to get from house/shop if its unlighted 

walk through door and good radio if you like to listen to that or stream somethign on wifi or run it through that device for better sound when working

exhaust fan for fumes - i ahve a ceiling fan to move air around also and a dehumidifier to run when i dont need the ac on to keep things dry and floor from sweating - my concrete guy didnt manage to put plastic under  my floor!!!!! jerkity jerk face jerk so dont forget the plastic to help the sweating part.

floor drain in cold storage area so you can sweep/wash things as needed, maybe a hydrant through the floor for that so you dont have to worry about it in winter, you can buy the cheap on demand 110v hot water heaters and run a pex valve to it if you want hot water and then back drain it as needed for winter with a simple ball valve. 

roof vents in the cold storage area or put in ceiling on bottom of trusses and add insulation there if you want to maintain some temps in the cold storage and not teh wide swings - it will help with floor sweating to some degree - regardless insulate the ceiling - if you dont you will get condensation and it will drip all over inside 

 

 

 

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I would spend dollars on making the shop bigger vs spending money doing floor heat or other extravagant in floor creations cheapest and easiest to install is propane radiant heaters the floor heat is ok but very expensive useless your working on the floor all day in your short sleeve shirt its a waste of money as for floor anchors that's something you'll have to figure out I would install large approach aprons fr working on outside projects also

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insulate well , wide roll up insulated doors  

floor drain, floor pit 

no light panels on roof, windows where you want for light and venting vs security

do not, do not put quick release air fittings at face level

 

 

 

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What he said ^^^  I know you probably dont want to hear that but 12' isnt wide enough to work on a tractor. My little shop is 18x40. It's a lean too building from my big barn. I struggle constantly with the width. A narrow work bench along the one wall, and the other side is welders and compressor. That leaves just enough room to walk around tractors. But hope you dont have to roll a cherry picker or something around it. I dont think I could function at 12'  

It's a shame you cant work around in floor heat. It's the best heat I've ever been around in a shop. 

Lots of receptacles and lights. I wish mine had a floor drain, even if it just ran over the hill. Lots of times i pull something inside with snow and it floods my small shop. Exhaust fans are great to suck out smoke. All that comes to mind 

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24 minutes ago, ksfarmdude said:

I would spend dollars on making the shop bigger vs spending money doing floor heat or other extravagant in floor creations cheapest and easiest to install is propane radiant heaters the floor heat is ok but very expensive useless your working on the floor all day in your short sleeve shirt its a waste of money as for floor anchors that's something you'll have to figure out I would install large approach aprons fr working on outside projects also

I disagree on floor heat. My buddy has a big shop hooked to a wood boiler. Once it's up to temp he uses very little wood. Your very comfortable working in there, and recovery after a door is opened is quick. After spending some time wrenching in his I wouldnt consider anything less. Maybe hooked to a propane boiler it may get expensive I dont know. 

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The one advantage to in floor heat that nobody mentioned yet is recovery time when you open the door to move something out. It takes little to no time for the ambient temperature to get back to where it was after the big doors are opened because the floor is one big heat sink. Open the doors and drive something out in a shop with a modine or a similar heat source and it will take longer to recover, you lose all your heat once the door is open. There will be fuel savings in the long run due to the quicker recovery time. Yes, in floor heat is more expensive and if you need anchor points in the floor it may not work for your application. The shop at the farm I worked at had in floor heat and it was nice to not have cold feet and if you have to work on a creeper it is warm also.

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6 minutes ago, Missouri Mule said:

I disagree on floor heat. My buddy has a big shop hooked to a wood boiler. Once it's up to temp he uses very little wood. Your very comfortable working in there, and recovery after a door is opened is quick. After spending some time wrenching in his I wouldnt consider anything less. Maybe hooked to a propane boiler it may get expensive I dont know. 

I would agree with you on very large buildings using floor heat as for smaller buildings I would go with another heat source  as for opening doors unless your going to leave them open for several minutes that's no big deal I have a neighbor that did a floor heat system in his building afew years ago and it cost him three times more than my heating system and the monthly cost of using propane to heat the antifrezze solution in the closed loop system was higher cost than my radiant heat I would recommend insulating the shop as good as can be My building is an energy performer Morton and it never gets below 60  degrees on the coldest of days just four days ago we had 11 below one morning and it was a toasty 62 degrees when I walked in

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Floor heat is the way to go. Radiant though warms a floor also. If you track actual heat costs a 40 x 48 properly insulated will cost you less than a 1000 gals a year to heat. That is up here by the Canadian border farther south you go less heat you will need. Concrete guy shop I was at today his furnace never turned on in 2 hours this morning was 50 above in his shop 20 degrees outside with no wind.

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i heat mine for about 30 to 40/month and cool for about the same - about 750sq ft - in the off months running dehumidifier its at least half less 

 

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   Have the outside of the building wrapped like a house before material goes on.  Cuts down on any sort of wind trying to get in.

   Windows up high for natural light.  I had 2 lower windows facing south.  2 up really high facing west.  My overhead door has windows to the east.  Get light from sun up to sun down.  

   This is my air system.  Instead of waisting floor space,  I went up,  upper tank is extra air storage.

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I built a 32x48x12'8" in 2004.

I would say the same as build bigger but you can't so let's talk about what you can do. I did put in a radiant floor but I never use it, it's there all connected but I should have put more tubing in the floor. Firstly I would build off a least a 2' grade beam and then frame up 2-2x4 off setting walls so your insulation has no direct path through your wall and use 2x8 sill plates. You are going to have a hard time separating clean and dirty work types in that small of a space. I have a 20x32 space in the back for machining which also has a vaulted ceiling in the back with a 16x32 mezzanine, with your added height you will be able to walk anywhere up top without hitting your head. The front 28x32 is more for welding and mechanics with a flat ceiling, I have a 10x20 overhead door but you could go higher, this is off an end wall as the snow slides off the metal side walls, man door is off the end as well. I would pour 6" concrete with 5/8 or 3/4 rebar and reinforce if your considering a car hoist and your pull pockets. You could place railroad track just above the floor height if you are going to work on tracked equipment. Lastly put a sump trench in, my buddy added a Hvac duct coming off the side in his that ran to an exhaust fan on the side wall outside, he would wet everything down and then turn it on for painting and it was a crude down draft.

Im sure there is other stuff I have forgot...

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14 hours ago, Whats in the barn ? said:

Going to insulate entire building just need any other ideas ?????

I think you will be glad you did. I wouldn't divide it. Just leave it one big room. My shop is in a building 36x45. It was already there. I had it spray foamed. Put in a furnace and central air. I done this 4 years ago and I love it. I think in a machine shop, with all the tools you will have, one big room would be better. I draw propane out of the house tank, so I don't know exactly what it costs to heat but it doesn't cost much. You know your wants and needs better than the rest of us. I put in a ceiling fan and I think it helps keep the floor a little less coldwithout floor heat. I'm not in there everyday so this setup  is way,way better than what I had to use for years

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My recommendations.

A smaller shop is ok but more square is better than long and skinny.

A large storage building is required, otherwise your shop becomes a storage building.

Insulation is very important.  

Thx-Ace

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