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Dasnake

John Deere

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10 minutes ago, bitty said:

According to this it was a styled '39 JD B . If this is correct styled ones came out in '38 

Thats correct.  The styled B came out in July of 38' and the A in August and they were considered the start of the 39' models.  The B also started out selling the A in 39' too leading it to JD's most sold tractor.  

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Flat spoke wheels came out in 1939. The only year they were used as they had a tendency to crack out the center hub. In 1940 they went to the 38" pressed wheel. They are easy to spot as they are 36" only. I own a very early , all original 1939 B with those wheels. It has the fabricated wire grill screens. The picture of my youngest daughter was taken a few years back at the Granite IA threshing bee. It's now her tractor.

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I did some looking and came up with the term “skeleton wheel” how is that term?

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14 minutes ago, Dasnake said:

I did some looking and came up with the term “skeleton wheel” how is that term?

Check out this old red power thread.  Towards the bottom you will see pictures of skeleton wheels on an Oliver.  I think they were the ones that came up with the concept and everybody copied them.  

https://www.redpowermagazine.com/forums/topic/103480-skeleton-wheels/

 

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43 minutes ago, Dasnake said:

I did some looking and came up with the term “skeleton wheel” how is that term?

These are what John Deere called skeleton wheels. Oliver called them tip toe lugs. My oldest daughter on her 1935 B. 

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1 hour ago, Big Bud guy said:

Check out this old red power thread.  Towards the bottom you will see pictures of skeleton wheels on an Oliver.  I think they were the ones that came up with the concept and everybody copied them.  

https://www.redpowermagazine.com/forums/topic/103480-skeleton-wheels/

 

Interesting, thanks, especially the oliver.

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48 minutes ago, cedar farm said:

These are what John Deere called skeleton wheels. Oliver called them tip toe lugs. My oldest daughter on her 1935 B. 

camera 010.JPG

Great look, looks like hard rubber on the front, thanks to all. 

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8 hours ago, cedar farm said:

Flat spoke wheels came out in 1939. The only year they were used as they had a tendency to crack out the center hub. In 1940 they went to the 38" pressed wheel. They are easy to spot as they are 36" only. I own a very early , all original 1939 B with those wheels. It has the fabricated wire grill screens. The picture of my youngest daughter was taken a few years back at the Granite IA threshing bee. It's now her tractor.

camera 009.JPG

Looks like an identicle twin to the '40 B Dad bought in December '68, except the '40 B had 9-38 Firestone rear tires on pressed steel wheels.  It had a little less paint on it than your '39.  When I got done going over the sheetmetal with a BIG angle grinder and twisted wire cup brush it actually had a greener color to it than before I started. We already had decals and paint for it, left over from the R in 1964 so I painted it the week before I started college.

   We paid $90 for it,  and that was more than it was worth. Sold for $120 with new paint in December '72.  4-1/2 mph road gear, reverse seemed about 7 mph. Armstrong start got Real old fast when it wouldn't start. No hydraulics, no battery so couldn't run a radio.  So mostly it SAT.  Dad narrowed it up to about 68-69 inches wide to pull the spreader thru the hog house to clean 2-3 loads of manure a year.  It pulled the JD R spreader, 4-1/2 mph not 6-1/2 mph like the Super H.  Was funny, Dad would not run it other than those few loads of manure,  I tried raking hay one time with it, we never hooked ANYTHING to the PTO. Had no belt driven implements left on the farm, so it sat.  I don't really see how Deere ever sold a second tractor to anyone!

I kept comparing the '40 B to our '39 H, that had 16 mph road gear, modified 800 psi belly pump,  6 volt tractor radios were plentiful, touch of the starter button and the H jumped to life immediately.  We didn't pull the planter with the '39 H,  but it probably could have with duals. The 10-38 GY tires on the H were less than 50% tread but had sound casings.  So we probably only put 200-220 hours a year on the H. The Super H as IH advertised did everything the H did about 30% faster. And we put 250 hours on it all 4 years we farmed with it.  And maybe 10-15 hours total on the B in 4 years.  I even used the Super H and a towbar to pull the B the 8 miles to and from town to pressure wash it for paint.  Less than a half hour  each way with a Farmall, and TWO hours running the 4-speed B, even the 6-speed B's, 50's, 520,530's would have been a 48 minute trip at 10 mph.

  Yep, Sorry,  I've spent enough time on old two cylinders to truly say I do not even want to be around them when they are running.  Worst day of my life was rotary hoeing 80 acres of beans with a 6-30 hoe behind a #60 JD. 4th gear, it wouldn't pull 5th. TEN STRAIGHT HOURS listening to that thing hammer and bang. 

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We had two styled Bs, one late '40s with cast iron frame like the ones pictured and another '52 with pressed steel frame. Both were electric start and started real easy although the lights had lost the mirroring and weren't the best.

The '52 had 6 speeds and way more useful including a descent road gear. You have to remember that the tractors that came originally on steel wheels would not have a fast road gear as it would be too dangerous. The '52 had an aftermarket 3 point that worked quite well but no draft, of course.

The A was actually my FIL's, '49, or maybe '50 with pressed steel frame. Hydraulics came off the powertrol to lift the mounted sickle bar mower.

I've still got a 620. It mostly pulls a York rake or plows and rotor tills the garden. I also use an offset flail mower on it although it should have some front weights  when carrying it. I'm always amazed that even if well below zero it fires on the first turn. Good CAT 2 three point.

You should have a headset on any open station tractor, more so on a 2 cylinder! Harley riders might appreciate the sound.

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Doctor Evil. I would have to agree. When you run both it is quite amazing how many two cylinders where sold. Even going back to the D vs the 15-30. Two vs three speed trans. The 15-30 had a pto that worked. The D takes a 1/2 acre to turn around. A hand brake way out of reach. I have a 28' D that starts with two turns of the flywheel. That is two big turns the older I get. But what a great sound when pulling a plow. 

Grandpa traded his F-20 in on a new 1940 A. He said the local IHC dealer was a crook. Everyone bought local and I think the local dealer was a huge factor in what you farmed with. He then bought a new 1948 A then added a 1950 B(still have it). In 1957 he bought a new WD-45 with power steering. Dad said they didn't know how bad they had it before after running the Allis. They traded that off on a new 1963 D17(still have it) Dad was looking at buying a 190XT but came home with a new 1970 4020 instead. I still own it. Over 12,000 hours and only had bearings put in it. 

You compare a JD B to an IHC H. About the same comparison as a 4010 to a 560. I love my 560's, 706,656 and 806, but the 4010/4020 tipped the tractor world upside down when they came out.

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1 hour ago, cedar farm said:

When you run both it is quite amazing how many two cylinders where sold. Even going back to the D vs the 15-30. Two vs three speed trans. The 15-30 had a pto that worked. The D takes a 1/2 acre to turn around. A hand brake way out of reach. I have a 28' D that starts with two turns of the flywheel. That is two big turns the older I get. But what a great sound when pulling a plow. 

Grandpa traded his F-20 in on a new 1940 A.. 

Funny I thought we were the only one that traded an IH in for a 2 cylinder.  Ours was a 600 to an 830.

I have a 1927 D with a PTO minus the actual shaft.  The gear box is there.  Someone mounted a loader on it and everything from the transmission back was shot.  So I found a 28’ D carcass and moved everything over to the 27’ including the steel wheels.  My beef with the D when it comes to comparing to the 15-30 wasn’t the PTO or the transmission. It’s the external worm gear steering and lack of turning brakes.   The steering was fixed in 1931 just in time for the great depresssion.  2 gears was adequate in the steel wheel days.  The PTO was an afterthought but out here anyway I’d say maybe 1 out 5 Ds had a PTO and most of them ran a farmhand loader.   I dont think it affect sales much.  The 15-30 got a two year head start on the D but by 1930 the D was nipping at the heals of the 15-30.  


 


 

 

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