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pt756

using a speedy sleeve?

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hello. on our ford 5600 we have a power steering leak. twice we used a speedy sleeve and it works for awhile, on another site I asked and a guy said you should use a sealant, would that be an option? does it go under the sleeve or dribbled on top?  what would you use a threadlocker? the shaft where the speedy sleeve goes is scratched up so we know thats where it leaks, the power steering unit for a ford is kind of pricey and the sleeve kit is kind of made for that repair, thanks for help.

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i tried speedy sleeves on my cam on mercruiser i/o 4cyl engine, lasted 1 yr and about 20 hours running time on the engine - they are not HARDENED metal and the seals cut the metal quickly or catch on it as its spinning - i tried it twice and after it failing twice its been sitting in my barn for two years waiting repairs - too many more important things to fix - i have not had good luck with them personally I will not spend my money/time going thru the motions only to have to repair multiple times, they are a bandaid at best and we all know how long a bandaid lasts. 

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Used one on the pto out put shaft of the Farmall C , I haven’t had a problem with it . 
I don’t know 🤷‍♂️ wish it could help , not familiar with your application . 
 

now on the 560 we did chrome and reground the one of the shafts cause it was used in the needle bearing .

all kinds of ways to fix shafts, 

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We try not to use speedi sleeves as well, not that we have had bad luck with them as searcyfarms lists, possibly the sleeve he bought wasn't a SKF?.... they are spendy - like $50+ and up.

When you do install one I would recommend a Loctite 609, bearing retaining compound for press fit joints. I put a thin coat on the shaft and inside the sleeve. Install then wipe off excess. You do not want any sealant on the surface that the seal rides.

Another trick I have used on lip seals/worn shafts. Aggressively polish the groove on the shaft, you want it smoothed out pretty good. Pull the tensioning spring out of the seal - if look closely you will find where the spring loop is connected - this will thread apart - do so. Cut a small length off the female end of the connection and re-thread together, put the spring back in the seal. Holds a little more tension on the lip to make up for the shaft wear.

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hey thanks for the help, I have a parts picture of a ford steering pump. all self contained, would be nice to just get the shaft . whole unit is 700 to 1600 dollars,

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If the grooves are bad under the sleeve, you might want to build them up with JB Weld and shoeshine them down with sandpaper so that the sleeve has a smooth surface to ride on.

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21 hours ago, Cattech said:

We try not to use speedi sleeves as well, not that we have had bad luck with them as searcyfarms lists, possibly the sleeve he bought wasn't a SKF?.... they are spendy - like $50+ and up.

When you do install one I would recommend a Loctite 609, bearing retaining compound for press fit joints. I put a thin coat on the shaft and inside the sleeve. Install then wipe off excess. You do not want any sealant on the surface that the seal rides.

Another trick I have used on lip seals/worn shafts. Aggressively polish the groove on the shaft, you want it smoothed out pretty good. Pull the tensioning spring out of the seal - if look closely you will find where the spring loop is connected - this will thread apart - do so. Cut a small length off the female end of the connection and re-thread together, put the spring back in the seal. Holds a little more tension on the lip to make up for the shaft wear.

ditto, get something to hold it on in place so it doesnt walk on the shaft you are fixing, i wont likely try this as a repair again on anything i own, had luck for the same amount of time by trying to emery/sand/smooth out the pitted shaft the first time before trying a speedy sleeve - im replacing the defective shaft this time tired of the headache 

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I'm pretty sure it requires use of bearing retainer as part of its instructions, also it helps get it in place if things are snug, I have had good luck with them, gives a nice clean surface, maybe not for everything, but sure beat the alternative at times. 

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