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660 driver

My new triple

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20200112_102605.thumb.jpg.bb9e93c8068e7468b1bec334f9c00bf3.jpg1997 thundercat. Has 4000 chassis miles and 1000 engine miles after a new top end. '94 thundercat dg pipes and an older thundercat cdi with a better timing curve. '05 cat front suspension and polaris clutching. Also has a track off a newer cat. It rips! Only problem is it has no studs. Any suggestions what i should put on it for studs? Came out of jefferson iowa.

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sheet metal screws? 

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1 minute ago, searcyfarms said:

sheet metal screws? 

Ya that would be cheap and easy but theyll never stand up.

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They do make a screw that is a stud, and you might be able to make it through the season and get something out of Haydays, your pretty  Lose

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4 minutes ago, 660 driver said:

Ya that would be cheap and easy but theyll never stand up.

guess some hornet/stingers or woodys will be the only option then

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4 minutes ago, AKwelder said:

They do make a screw that is a stud, and you might be able to make it through the season and get something out of Haydays, your pretty  Lose

I only wanna do it once even though im only gonna put 96 on to start with. Theres a couple different styles out there and they are spendy. With the raw torque that thing has they gotta be tough.

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Just now, 660 driver said:

I only wanna do it once even though im only gonna put 96 on to start with. Theres a couple different styles out there and they are spendy. With the raw torque that thing has they gotta be tough.

Which track?  Got a picture of the profile?   If it’s what I remember as a full block track there are wide spots in the paddles, I would not be afraid of putting studs in these wide points.

we don’t run studs anymore so it’s a way back memory for me.  

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Do 144 or 168. Not just 96.   Woodys gold diggers are everywhere, oldschool, good stud.  The hornet/stingers areveasier to find by me in NY as they are made here.  You want "1.175" length or "1.2xx",  (they measure longer, but that's what they are called) . Small by today's standards, but that is all your bulkhead has room for up front.  I had "1.375"s in mine back in the day, they stood 3/4" above a .92" track, and they would rub the front bulkhead sometimes. 

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8 minutes ago, 660 driver said:

I only wanna do it once even though im only gonna put 96 on to start with. Theres a couple different styles out there and they are spendy. With the raw torque that thing has they gotta be tough.

spend the money and do it right ONCE - do the measuring to know what you can get by with for clearance - maybe if you got a slower sled or a lighter thumb you could get away with sheet metal screws/washers 😉 you gotta pay to play

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Ak it has a track off an f5 i believe he said. Its that era track anyway. I can take piccy of it later

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Had a sneaking suspicion that’s what this thread would be about lol  At least about the snowmobile part lol  

Always liked the sound of a nice running triple. Lots of guys running studs now on the new sidewinders to try and get all the power to the ground. If they’ll survive there I’m sure you’ll have good luck as well.  I’ve never had the need for studs and have personally been leery of them as they’ve been known to take out a front heat exchanger or two over the years. 

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I have 144 studs in my zrt 600 with a dead culinder but im gonna fix it so im not gonna take em out. 

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Remove a stud from your 600 and put the entire thing in a caliper. Then call a stud vendor and ask them to measure their studs in the same manner for you.  Then pick one that size or larger, depending on how big you want to go.  I've installed about 10,000 (likely more) studs into my own AC sleds and I'm telling you that not all stud manufactures measure the same, and your talking an old school sled that many stud sellers likely couldn't give a good recomendation for anyway. Post pic of your track. F5's were all 128" tracks, ZRT's were 121.  There is no accurate way to measure for stud clearance on your bulkhead heat exchanger.  The track will balloon forward off the drivers as dependent on track tension and mph.  A 1.075 stud use to be commin on those, it was just tiny.  A 1.375 will hit. So your in the middle.  Since you have your 600 to compare to, your in a good place for buying studs/length/quantity.  I thought maybe it was your first sled like that.  

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Look the polaris weights over in your primary clutch.  The $50 bushings go bad and if neglected, ruin a $400 clutch.  The weights need to look like they are all setting equally square to the roller. Back in the day I use to buy bushings in large quantity, seemed a buddy always needed a set. I use to change mine every 500-1000 mile, but the average set should go 2k

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The rule I was always told is 1 stud per HP. That T-Cat was north of 170 stock and with the tuned ignition and Polaris clutching it will be better than that. So a 192-196 even a 244 pattern is going to be needed. When under-studded you can spin the track too violently and studs will tear through... destroying it.

For length, you want about 1/4" height over track lugs with regular steel studs or approximately 1/8" if you use carbide tipped. You are better off with less penetration & more picks. Again, problem is tear through, they cannot be allowed to get too good a bite and keel over rather than slip.

Some people have been using ice screws originally meant for motorcycle/ATV tires rather than studs. #1 benefit being you don't have to drill holes in the track and compromise the internal cords. They're much easier to install, lighter, and don't ruin the belt if pulled out. If I were going to try to improve the traction on my sleds I probably would go this route. No telling how these would hold up to a high HP sled like yours though.

As mentioned above, tunnel clearance must be accounted for. Your T-Cat will have extra considerations because of the 1000cc 130 mph capabilities.

With that motor, no matter how many picks you put in, it will spin out. Adapting a roll out and ease into the power riding approach is about the only way to actually use the power the big triples put out.... That said, be careful! My neighbor put 3 hoods on his in 600 miles, then sold it before it killed him! And have fun!

 

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1 hour ago, 660 driver said:

I have 144 studs in my zrt 600 with a dead culinder but im gonna fix it so im not gonna take em out. 

Just try to keep the track side down Antonio.

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The only stud that goes on my sled is me.😁

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Those big kitties were all the rage when I was a teenager I wanted one so bad I could taste it, right up until I got the first one stuck, heavy and nothing to hold onto . What a pig. 

Go like a turpentined cat on the hard trail and wallow like a pig in the deep snow, the F series was a big upgrade 

i don’t use picks but what little riding I do is backwoods narrow and steep, 

hope you really enjoy it, they were a powerhouse 

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I'd shoot for 3/8" stud above the lug, assuming it doesn't gave a 1.25" track on it. Stock track as .85 or .92.    

5/16 stud would be pretty tiny.  

1/2" some would say is too much. 

Anything under 5/16 would be good for safety in corners and when braking, but that's about it. 

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Ya were into cats too. This is my 4th one but only my 2nd triple. One of ems got to go and im thinkin the '99 zl 440 will be up for sale. Ran it about 3 miles tonight and it aint runnin right. Compression was 120 or better across all 3 but it had old gas and wet plugs in it. It didnt run at all last year. He bought newer sleds 2 years ago. I syphoned out old gas,put new 91 non oxy and sea foam in it and screwed in 3 new br9eya plugs. Hoping the plilots are just gummy. The are different than my '97 zrt 600 in how they attach to the airbox. No boots on airbox side. It better just be carbs. There was ni snow in jefferson iowa so i couldnt ride it but we did run it and it sounded fine.

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Seafoam is good stuff, but if it doesn't clean right out, I'd suggest removing the carbs for a good cleaning. Safest thing to do. 

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4 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

Seafoam is good stuff, but if it doesn't clean right out, I'd suggest removing the carbs for a good cleaning. Safest thing to do. 

Ya these triples just have that sound when they aint quite right and the torque isnt quite there. Hope my 3 mile ride didnt screw anything up. 

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12 hours ago, 660 driver said:

I only wanna do it once even though im only gonna put 96 on to start with. Theres a couple different styles out there and they are spendy. With the raw torque that thing has they gotta be tough.

Grew up fixing, racing and building theses powerhouses of the 90's. From my experience don't waste your time with 96 studs, you will ruin the track as it will be severely under studded and you will more than likely put one through the front heat exchanger. I would suggest swapping the track to an 1-1/4 Camoplast Ripsaw, or the ice ripper. The ice ripper has pre moulded miniature studs in the lugs to provide better traction in icy conditions. 

Ultimately it is your machine and your preference. Personally I avoid studs in my own machines, but love them in customer machines. Service and repair bills were generally higher when working on them. 

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