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Looking for opinions on AF combine parts


chadd
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On the last field of the season this year , I noticed that I lost a patch of slats from the sieve on our 1440 combine.  It looks like my options for replacement are used, aftermarket, and OEM.  Anyone had any experiences with used or aftermarket sieves?  Getting used seems risky to me; most combines that end up in junk yards are used up and I'd be afraid that I'd probably only get a year or two before I get to repeat the process again.  

Any thoughts/experiences?

I noticed that a few grain pan and shoe pan bushings are getting loose and am planning on tackling those as well.  I was wondering if the super expensive dealer alignment tool is necessary to do the job right or not?  None of the local dealers around me seem to have the tool, or if they do, they don't seem to want to rent it out.  I think that someone has messed with them at least once before, as none of the bushing locations or number of shims seem the same from side to side.

Chad

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Sometimes a combine in the wrecking yard will have fairly new parts on it. You never really know till you check things out. We've bought used sieves before, but just check the rods where they pivot for wear. If they are grooved in pretty good it won't last long. We have also fixed them before too. Easiest with a mig welder but I have braised the sections on to a new rod and it is good as new. Had to replace a few missing slats this past year on the 1682, and did it with the stick welder. Not pretty but it worked lol. But generally if they start to fly out the rest won't be far behind. Ours let go from trying to clean mud and snow off them. Rest of the seive was excellent yet

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If you're going to replace bushings just do them all. If a couple are bad, others aren't far behind. I buy quite a few new parts from Worthington's seem to be of good quality and fair price. 

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Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought a few years back there was really only 1 supplier making all the sieve/chaffers for everybody--OEM or Aftermarket.  (Except the airfoil/etc "Unique" types).  If this is true, I would think best price rules!

I wouldn't be afraid to look used...a lot of times a combine may have a fairly new chaffer installed shortly before something else breaks.  As noted, check for play in the pivot wires.

I've braised the "notches" on the pivot wires before.  Its actually easier than you might think....once you get the right heat, the braising just "fills the notch".  Didn't even have to file them down.   But--its tedious.  I only did this on a chaffer that was mostly good, but had a few sections where wires were grooved.   Obviously this only works if the chaffer comes apart (unlike some older designs!)

WARNING: If your shaker bushings are bad, you will just destroy whatever new sieve/chaffer you install!  Fix that first.  As noted...do them all--its not worth doing a half job there.

 

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how do you get the "dealer alignment tool"? Can you buy them? What is the part number to order? Parts/Service people seem vague if you can still get them. Would like to know how to get a set. Yes use them after you replace all the bushings/bearings on the cleaning system.

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What do you mean “ dealer alignment tool” ? There is a set of tools for pressing the bushings out and back in. Unless the US dealers got tools we didn’t get in Oz, we used to set up the bushings as per the service manual with a pair of rulers ( one across the bushing and the other to measure the offset.

Press kit.

AED63CE4-1312-4AA5-BFEF-286E9FCD895C.png.fbc375e5b8f636b16004cda83baf81b1.png

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Ok, did some googling and saw the tool I think you mean and yea you don’t need it. Get the offsets and press in new bushings ( or have the dealer do it, only about an hours work with a good hyd press) then follow what I copied below ( I wrote it out a while back on a 2388 shaker thread, I wasn’t retyping it....) 

 

 

Take the drive belt off, mark the shaker drive pulley at 12 o'clock, then turn the pulley by hand and see where the mark is. If it isn't at approximately 6 o'clock, you haven't put the system back together correctly.

 You need to loosen all the bolts on the bushings and centre the shaker on its stroke ( mark the extremes and find the centre) then you need 3 people, one to hold the pulley and the others to tighten the system. Throw the impact wrench in the tool box and leave it there it has no business being near a shaker? then  Start with the bolts that go thru the header frame then the move on to the ones on the shaker fram and then the eccentric bolts and the two at the back on the upper lower transfer arms. Then check the 12-6 position again.

Also check the auger bed hasn't dropped on its bolts ( they do crack around the bolts on the sides we ( the dealer) had a local metal fab shop punch out 1/4 steel strips with double the holes and reinforced the sides if the auger bed ) and as was said in another post make sure it's not hitting the auger bed.

Another thing to check is that the main shaker hex shaft bearings are square to the frame of the machine. Find a point on the main frame ( there is a C channel there that works )  of the machine and measure to the bearings ( the eccentrics need to be off for this) it should obviously be the same.

Lastly ensure its shimmed central between the shaker arms, ask your dealer for the page out of the service manual that shows the amount of washers that goes between the arms and the frames, it gives you a start point but you may have to add or delete a washer somewhere to get it central.

 Andrew.

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Most likely your bushings failed first causing the sieve to fail. Sieves seem to last a long, long time if you keep your bushings good. Don't use aftermarket bushings. They do not last. I think caseih has better and poorer grade bushings. Don't skimp on the bushings. Make sure your eccentric bearings are good also while you have it tore apart.

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18 hours ago, larv71 said:

If you're going to replace bushings just do them all. If a couple are bad, others aren't far behind. I buy quite a few new parts from Worthington's seem to be of good quality and fair price. 

I was going to do them all.  There is no sense in getting that far in only to do half the job.  Out of curiosity, how do you get to the ones on the right side of the combine?  They are packed in behind the clean grain and tailings elevators; it doesn't look like there is enough room to get the arm out?

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17 hours ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought a few years back there was really only 1 supplier making all the sieve/chaffers for everybody--OEM or Aftermarket.  (Except the airfoil/etc "Unique" types).  If this is true, I would think best price rules!

I wouldn't be afraid to look used...a lot of times a combine may have a fairly new chaffer installed shortly before something else breaks.  As noted, check for play in the pivot wires.

I've braised the "notches" on the pivot wires before.  Its actually easier than you might think....once you get the right heat, the braising just "fills the notch".  Didn't even have to file them down.   But--its tedious.  I only did this on a chaffer that was mostly good, but had a few sections where wires were grooved.   Obviously this only works if the chaffer comes apart (unlike some older designs!)

WARNING: If your shaker bushings are bad, you will just destroy whatever new sieve/chaffer you install!  Fix that first.  As noted...do them all--its not worth doing a half job there.

 

Thanks for the info.  Yeah, it wouldn't be worth it to get that deep in and only do half of it.  I was planning on replacing them all.

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14 hours ago, 756-310 said:

how do you get the "dealer alignment tool"? Can you buy them? What is the part number to order? Parts/Service people seem vague if you can still get them. Would like to know how to get a set. Yes use them after you replace all the bushings/bearings on the cleaning system.

There is a $1400 tool set made by OTC for CNH that aligns the chaffer/grain pan with the chassis of the combine to make sure that they are properly aligned.  If you google "chaffer alignment tool"  there are pictures of it.  Must be made out of platinum or something at that price...

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I suggest going to the 2nd page of the Axial Flow thread pinned to the top.  There is a link I posted where you can download the service shop manual, it walks you through step by step how to replace the bushings, the proper way to do it without the million dollar tool.

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4 hours ago, chadd said:

There is a $1400 tool set made by OTC for CNH that aligns the chaffer/grain pan with the chassis of the combine to make sure that they are properly aligned.  If you google "chaffer alignment tool"  there are pictures of it.  Must be made out of platinum or something at that price...

OTC stands for overpriced tool company, they are good tools but expensive 

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10 hours ago, 696IH said:

What do you mean “ dealer alignment tool” ? There is a set of tools for pressing the bushings out and back in. Unless the US dealers got tools we didn’t get in Oz, we used to set up the bushings as per the service manual with a pair of rulers ( one across the bushing and the other to measure the offset.

Press kit.

AED63CE4-1312-4AA5-BFEF-286E9FCD895C.png.fbc375e5b8f636b16004cda83baf81b1.png

The tool I am referring to is made out of stamped steel. they come as a pair. One end hooks to the bushing on the cast steel shaker arm bushing and the other bolts to the combine frame in a hole that is already there. Be sure to loosen the double sided belt on the right side of the combine. You bolt one to the right side of the combine and the other to the left side.  If everything on both sides bolt right up then the cleaning shoe is "in time and square" in the combine. If not, the bolts on the last side you connect the tool to will not line up perfectly. If the cleaning shoe is out of time then you need to loosed all bolts on all bushings and get the bolts on the tool to line up and tighten the bushing bolts. Does anyone know the CaseIH part number for the tool I refer to? This tool will fit all AFX machines from 1420 through at least 2588. I think is may fit the legacy machines as well. This tool is to be sure the cleaning shoe is in the middle of it's stroke when the bushings are tightened.

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56 minutes ago, 756-310 said:

The tool I am referring to is made out of stamped steel. they come as a pair. One end hooks to the bushing on the cast steel shaker arm bushing and the other bolts to the combine frame in a hole that is already there. Be sure to loosen the double sided belt on the right side of the combine. You bolt one to the right side of the combine and the other to the left side.  If everything on both sides bolt right up then the cleaning shoe is "in time and square" in the combine. If not, the bolts on the last side you connect the tool to will not line up perfectly. If the cleaning shoe is out of time then you need to loosed all bolts on all bushings and get the bolts on the tool to line up and tighten the bushing bolts. Does anyone know the CaseIH part number for the tool I refer to? This tool will fit all AFX machines from 1420 through at least 2588. I think is may fit the legacy machines as well. This tool is to be sure the cleaning shoe is in the middle of it's stroke when the bushings are tightened.

According to google, the part number is 38002781.

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1 hour ago, 756-310 said:

The tool I am referring to is made out of stamped steel. they come as a pair. One end hooks to the bushing on the cast steel shaker arm bushing and the other bolts to the combine frame in a hole that is already there. Be sure to loosen the double sided belt on the right side of the combine. You bolt one to the right side of the combine and the other to the left side.  If everything on both sides bolt right up then the cleaning shoe is "in time and square" in the combine. If not, the bolts on the last side you connect the tool to will not line up perfectly. If the cleaning shoe is out of time then you need to loosed all bolts on all bushings and get the bolts on the tool to line up and tighten the bushing bolts. Does anyone know the CaseIH part number for the tool I refer to? This tool will fit all AFX machines from 1420 through at least 2588. I think is may fit the legacy machines as well. This tool is to be sure the cleaning shoe is in the middle of it's stroke when the bushings are tightened.

Yea mate I get what it’s for, I did at least 50 shakers from 14xx to the new xx88 series when I was a Case IH tech, some Dealer tools you just don’t need.

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