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Working on stuff in the winter?

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Heard a guy say he mixes 4 gallons #2 diesel with a gallon of gas and uses in the torpedo.

Anyone do that and does it help with the stench?

 

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31 minutes ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Heard a guy say he mixes 4 gallons #2 diesel with a gallon of gas and uses in the torpedo.

Anyone do that and does it help with the stench?

 

You want clean you have to go LP, it’s lower btu/gallon by far but if you want to be there, you have to breathe, that said LP or diesel keep your n mind all those things consume oxygen, if you’re shop isn’t drafty enough you can find yourself with a bad situation in a hurry, as the oxygen gets consumed the thing starts burning poorly and crates carbon monoxide compounding the situation.

Be aware, be alert and be careful, use common sense. A battery operated detector wouldn’t go amiss either, remember they like to be warm, so don’t just leave it out in the cold when you aren’t there. 

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6 hours ago, farmallman77 said:

I have many projects going on.   Im currently working on the restoration of a Farmall A and a Power unit.   But here is my problem  My shop is not heated and I will be moving withing the year so heating it is not an option.   What can I do to make the shop bearable so I can work on my projects in the winter?   Its really killing my production only being able to work on stuff when its warm out.

 

Thanks

Chris

Spend a couple weeks working on something in the driveway or in the dirt on your back, and then a non heated shop will seem like the 4 seasons.

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5 hours ago, SAM86 said:

I use kerosene torpedo heaters. 45 minutes of run time with 55,000 BTU's brings my two car garage up to sweatshirt comfortable. Only insulation is in the ceiling. 5-10 gallons of kerosene usually lasts me a winter.

Depending on what I am working on, like big cast iron parts, I will place the torpedo heater close to where I will be working and let the hot air blow on them. You would be surprised how much heat a transmission housing will absorb and give off over the next hour or so when working on them. As common sense dictates, keep them aways from flammable or heat sensitive objects.

Another alternative, and my biggest motivation boost, is to use your basement. I loaded mine up with an entire O-4 before the snow hit, except for the transmission housing and front frame. I can run down and work on room temp pieces as time allows and don't have to wait for a warm up. The fun part will be getting the fully assembled engine out this spring.

You must not be married 😂

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1 hour ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Heard a guy say he mixes 4 gallons #2 diesel with a gallon of gas and uses in the torpedo.

Anyone do that and does it help with the stench?

 

I would be careful with the gas if you leave the heater unattended 

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2 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Heard a guy say he mixes 4 gallons #2 diesel with a gallon of gas and uses in the torpedo.

Anyone do that and does it help with the stench?

 

I doubt it would help much. I would not try it but then again I run straight #2 off road and it burns clean. 

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6 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

We use a JD space/torpedo heater runs on diesel and it can get a little smelly. We also have a heater that run of of propane it’s smaller, quieter and keeps the air cleaner. 

Used the diesel fired heaters before I discovered propane. It is nice to not have the burning eyes and throat now. Propane is the way to go. 😉

6 hours ago, MTO said:

Get a medium sized wood/coal stove and run a flue out a window and fill gap around flue with tin.

Did the turbo heaters and not to my liking

 

I still have a nice Blaze King wood stove in my shop. It was by far the best heat if you were spending a lot of time in the shop. The radiant heat warmed everything up and didn't draw cold air in through the leaks in my door like forced air. Loved the smell of good cured ash wood. My only negative was the time it took to get it going and warm a shop up from 0 degrees to comfortable shirtsleeve temps. 

One alternative I did was warm up the shop for a short time with a 350,000 btu forced air propane space (I think same as what some of you are calling torpedo) heater while I was getting the wood stove fired up. 

5 hours ago, vtfireman85 said:

I like the sound baffles you have hanging, those sorts of places can be so echoing if you don’t do something. Also I see you bough the same chop saw and stand as we have, our stand says Exxon but I suspect all these types of things come from the same factory 😉

Yeah, um, sound baffle science applied by pack rat technology. Not proud😪

I've never owned the dirt beneath my feet so have always used the shop I have been dealt. Don't stare at that pic too long. Sensory overload will occur.😵

What I have in that 20 x 20 shop would upfit a 60 x 80 shop very nice and leave just the right amount of room to  work comfortably. 

Chop saw stand, Mobil 1330 (do they still make that oil anymore?), it has survived many a chop saw. 

4 hours ago, searcyfarms said:

ive been looking for one of those exxon or DX or maybe even a pennzoil or quaker state chop saw stands but havent found one just yet. Ours all got remove when the tornado got the farm - we had some really cool old cans in the barn 

 

The green 55 gal is antifreeze. Kind of unique with the ripples. 

2 hours ago, cjf711 said:

Spend a couple weeks working on something in the driveway or in the dirt on your back, and then a non heated shop will seem like the 4 seasons.

Been there done that, bales were to keep a strong January North wind down to an annoying swirl😁

1295220742_baleunrollers.thumb.jpg.ad2df5e04cb64bb85bcdd1e91b9b38e2.jpg

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20 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Used the diesel fired heaters before I discovered propane. It is nice to not have the burning eyes and throat now. Propane is the way to go. 😉

Having used both diesel and propane in the shop I know what you mean. 

Its been said already the space heater sure warms the shop up in a hurry it sure is nice, but after that not really a lot of advantages of running them long term in a days time 

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We are up at the other end of the state

most projects in the pole barn are small and short time so I just bundle up in carharts 

the machine shop [butler building] has a wood pellet stove that heats up nice 

winter projects in there are great to do and no fumes

after working on kitchen equipment for many years  I am sensitive to Co.fumes

 

Mike

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My “heated shop” at this point is a big tarp and an LP ice shack heater.  Sheds are way too big and drafty to attempt heating.  That needs to change and soon as I have waaaaaayyy too much stuff to do in the shop over winter.

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I just bought a used 45000 BTU furnace for 75$. I am going to put it on a stand on a furniture dolly and convert to propane and run it off bbq tanks temporarily . My garage already has a chimney so all the fumes will go out. Nat gas or propane burners still leave CO if they are not vented outside I do not care how efficiently they burn and I have some difficulty breathing and am sensitive to them. I had a knipco that ran on propane and could tell it. A work still in progress.

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its taken me two days to think of the word we used since this topic sprung, me an my old timers memory ugh.............i worked for a farmer and we called them salamander heaters when i was a kid lol 

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18 minutes ago, VacDaddyt said:

I just bought a used 45000 BTU furnace for 75$. I am going to put it on a stand on a furniture dolly and convert to propane and run it off bbq tanks temporarily . My garage already has a chimney so all the fumes will go out. Nat gas or propane burners still leave CO if they are not vented outside I do not care how efficiently they burn and I have some difficulty breathing and am sensitive to them. I had a knipco that ran on propane and could tell it. A work still in progress.

thats why i went with electric, i have had CO poisoning 2x in my life - very scary - once in a farm shop working with two others and the youngest didnt respond when we asked for a tool, checked on him,  he was laying on a mechanic stroller and was very lethargic, boss and i were like i dont feel so good do you? he said no and we realized what was happening, we got the kid out and then we went out and got his wife and she headed to the hospital with us all, kid came around on way and we just slowly got better. Wife scolded us good!!!

2x was young/married and were gone and came home from vacation, winter, house was cold, turned on furnace to warm up, told wife to stay in house with baby, i was in/out carrying baggage etc......thot i was getting a lil dizzy but didnt think much about it since unloading and busy, kept thinking boy its not warming up very quickly - kept unloading, came in to find my wife prone on couch and said i dont feel good, sick to stomach, baby laying on her chest only a couple mos old, I kept going in/out got things unloaded - sat in lazy boy thot hmmm still cold, looked downstairs at furnace and could see burners barely lit with an orange glow, i knew then something was wrong adn got my wife and daughter adn we went out in van and i took them to ER, daughter needed O2 badly, scary for sure. They gave my wife some and in a couple hours we were all ok outside of the headaches. 

that was back in the day when CO detectors were not commonplace nor were the sensors on the propane furnaces. 

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1 hour ago, VacDaddyt said:

I just bought a used 45000 BTU furnace for 75$. I am going to put it on a stand on a furniture dolly and convert to propane and run it off bbq tanks temporarily . My garage already has a chimney so all the fumes will go out. Nat gas or propane burners still leave CO if they are not vented outside I do not care how efficiently they burn and I have some difficulty breathing and am sensitive to them. I had a knipco that ran on propane and could tell it. A work still in progress.

LP is something like 21,500BTU per pound. Your 15 pound tank will not last very long. You may want to consider a bigger tank. It would be much cheaper. 

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I have an old smudge pot around here somewhere you are welcome to have!

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23 hours ago, sandhiller said:

I use one of these puts out good heat and very efficient. Fan above pointing down spreads heat real well.

IMG_20200105_121442967.thumb.jpg.3dd05cfbf74f6dac341119ff5af6244e.jpg

I've got a tiny a$$ed shop

That’s exactly what I have minus the fan. I can hear my 25’ square garage (what fool made it that odd size is beyond me) usually in just over a half hour depending on how cold it is outside. Can get it to the point of wearing a sweater to work. But if you need to work up near the ceiling 🥵🥵. Look out!  You’ll be a grease spot before you know it!  Hence your fan idea!

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21 hours ago, bkorth said:

You must not be married 😂

To the contrary, married with a four and one year old. Having stuff in the basement shop helps optimize my time. I usually head that way around 9pm after the kids are in bed. No waiting for things to warm up. Also makes it easy for the kids to join/help. Our youngest spent the better part of the O-4 engine reassembly strapped to my chest in his carrier. 

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23 hours ago, Diesel Doctor said:

Heard a guy say he mixes 4 gallons #2 diesel with a gallon of gas and uses in the torpedo.

Anyone do that and does it help with the stench?

 

Mine has a slight kerosene puff a start up, but after that no smell (wife lets me know). I go through mine each season, clean the filters and check the pressures. If they are not set correctly they can be a smoke pot.

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1 hour ago, SAM86 said:

To the contrary, married with a four and one year old. Having stuff in the basement shop helps optimize my time. I usually head that way around 9pm after the kids are in bed. No waiting for things to warm up. Also makes it easy for the kids to join/help. Our youngest spent the better part of the O-4 engine reassembly strapped to my chest in his carrier. 

I was just razzing you, but I'd sure like to have your wife talk to mine.

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1 minute ago, bkorth said:

I was just razzing you, but I'd sure like to have your wife talk to mine.

Always taken in good stride. I don't know if it would help or hurt for the two to talk. Maybe I spend too much time in the shop, I sure don't think I do.

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My trick is to just eat alot and get a little bit fat and then the built in insulation will help you stay warm in the cold weather, I have no heat, gravel floor, and I just open the doors to the south amd hope for sun,

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On 1/5/2020 at 2:27 PM, sandhiller said:

I use one of these puts out good heat and very efficient. Fan above pointing down spreads heat real well.

IMG_20200105_121442967.thumb.jpg.3dd05cfbf74f6dac341119ff5af6244e.jpg

I've got a tiny a$$ed shop

Someone was talking about those ribbed barrels the other day. Was a John Deere barrel like that and they are crazy priced.

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There's direct and indirect heat. The direct heater puts the burned fumes into the room with you. As stated above, there are many dangers with this. Indirect heaters put the burned fumes outside. The hot fumes go through a heat exchanger. Clean air is blown through the heat exchanger and does not mix with the burned fumes. But is heated by the hot metal separating the two air streams. Indirect heating looses 7 to 10 percent efficiency but you breath clean air and your eyes don't water.

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An LB white propane furnace will put out a lot of heat, hang it from the ceiling and take it with you when you move.

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52 minutes ago, MarkG said:

There's direct and indirect heat. The direct heater puts the burned fumes into the room with you. As stated above, there are many dangers with this. Indirect heaters put the burned fumes outside. The hot fumes go through a heat exchanger. Clean air is blown through the heat exchanger and does not mix with the burned fumes. But is heated by the hot metal separating the two air streams. Indirect heating looses 7 to 10 percent efficiency but you breath clean air and your eyes don't water.

Well said. 

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