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The draft

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I have often wondered where all these young men and women come from.

America is fortunate to have these volunteers and I salute them.

Our armed force numbers are low imo and the day may come again when the draft may be necessary.

Of course, the draft doesn't want me buy it may want my grandkids.

My grandfathers/father/uncles/brother  and cousins all served  in WW1, WW2, Korea and Vietnam.

I hope and pray my grandkids are spared buy I am sure my great grands felt the same.

May God bless this country

 

 

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War has changed some since those days. I have hopes that the draft is not needed as recruits seem to be a better fit in ways. I am very thankful for those who are serving and those who have. 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

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There are studies that are showing that a small number of families are serving generation after generation, and these people are the largest group in the military.

 

in short, veterans are passing on their love of country to the next generation who is choosing to serve, and repeat

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44 minutes ago, AKwelder said:

There are studies that are showing that a small number of families are serving generation after generation, and these people are the largest group in the military.

 

in short, veterans are passing on their love of country to the next generation who is choosing to serve, and repeat

I grew up in a culture where everyone did their hitch and then went on with their lives. That's just the way it was. College ROTC,the Guard or Reserves. Everyone. I grew up thinking that's what our Military was and should be. A whole bunch of people who knew what it was and why and cared because they had a personal investment in it. That sure ain't what we have now.

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50 minutes ago, exSW said:

I grew up in a culture where everyone did their hitch and then went on with their lives. That's just the way it was. College ROTC,the Guard or Reserves. Everyone. I grew up thinking that's what our Military was and should be. A whole bunch of people who knew what it was and why and cared because they had a personal investment in it. That sure ain't what we have now.

And now families like ours are providing an overwhelming part of the military, like 85%, but that number is from memory so please take it with some skepticism 

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I am the first generation in my family that didn't do his part. Something I will regret till the day I die. Wish I would've listened to my old man.

My oldest served part time in the Guard for 8 years and went full time on Dec 23rd. Very proud of him.

Even though I let it skip my generation. Cade is keeping the tradition alive. 

A heartfelt thank you to those who have or continue to serve. Because of you I know I can go to bed at night and sleep safely and soundly.

 

 

 

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7D3B7569-ABA0-4856-8EB7-2267BA7FE7FF.jpegWe can do more with a small army of volunteers and some high quality technology than we could with large numbers of unwilling participants.

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6 hours ago, bitty said:

War has changed some since those days. I have hopes that the draft is not needed as recruits seem to be a better fit in ways. I am very thankful for those who are serving and those who have. 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

 I served. Volunteered (Late 1971) right at the end of the draft period.  Oh Yeah, half of the guys I started basic with were kicked out during the 1st 4 weeks--couldn't make it (and all you had to do was listen and do what you were told when you were told).  Lots of things have changed since the draft days. Pay scale starts now over $1700 a month.  Now the recruit is able to have much more say as to what and where he/she may do or go.  In the draft days they were told what and where and when.  With the increases in pay, other benefits, and opportunities over the years, the military is a lot more attractive now than when I went in.

 

Off we go into the wild blue wander                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Flying high into the sky...

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I thought this was going to be a thread about the draft control for a 3 point but this is good to

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I admit I was very scared of the idea of a draft 25 yrs ago, had no interest in going to boot camp and being shipped to some 3rd world country to be shot at. More than one time since then I wished I had voluntarily joined and had the experiences and learned some of the disciplines that time would have instilled. 

That said, seeing the current state of many of the young people joining the workforce, it probably wouldn't be a bad thing for a lot of these snowflakes.

But the reason the topic comes up again, I may guess, is because the media is blasting it all over. Claiming we are at the precipice of WWIII because we wiped out that dirtbag general from Iran. Not too worried about that.

 

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All younger guys still register for a draft but the draft has to be voted on  by congress if wartime happens (godforbid) before its put into law if the young fellas don't register they won't quailfy for any federal aid for college or any other assistance directed from the government

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4 hours ago, Rusty shackleford said:

I thought this was going to be a thread about the draft control for a 3 point but this is good to

i thot maybe the nfl draft or something since its that time of year with the playoffs 

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pertaining to the military draft - the days are long gone of a D day situation, Vietnam with ground troops etc...............while we still have a need for people on the ground, technology has long since taken over and we have weapons still unused/heard of from a technological standpoint. Nuclear isnt what i fear the most, I fear most neuro or viral agents - we have so many ways of bringing damaging things to areas w/out people its crazy. Lazer technology is also out there but not talked about much. 

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11 hours ago, jd560 said:

 I served. Volunteered (Late 1971) right at the end of the draft period.  Oh Yeah, half of the guys I started basic with were kicked out during the 1st 4 weeks--couldn't make it (and all you had to do was listen and do what you were told when you were told).  Lots of things have changed since the draft days. Pay scale starts now over $1700 a month.  Now the recruit is able to have much more say as to what and where he/she may do or go.  In the draft days they were told what and where and when.  With the increases in pay, other benefits, and opportunities over the years, the military is a lot more attractive now than when I went in.

 

Off we go into the wild blue wander                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Flying high into the sky...

Went in in 68, straight from a dairy farm my whole life. Didn't get out much, didn't know much of the world and wasn't thrilled to go. But I was a different person coming out. Fellows drafted from all over that I got along with for the most part and picked up different things from .  In basic back them most of us didn't know if drill instructors had rules on troop treatment. Most I went through with tried to make it.  One good thing going in was I could sleep later than on the farm. Even in basic over half the time.  Think I was getting less than 90 dollars a month starting out and 350 and some when I left as a E5.  Looking back it was probably good for me. But what a good feeling when I completed my hitch. Was lucking nobody from my area was getting in my face coming home like some faced.  On another note have learned  over time that the person not making threats can be the most dangerous, Dave

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17 hours ago, brewcrew said:

7D3B7569-ABA0-4856-8EB7-2267BA7FE7FF.jpegWe can do more with a small army of volunteers and some high quality technology than we could with large numbers of unwilling participants.

 

Guys buy today's population only 5% would be needed to fill out the ranks to field forces like we did in WWII. Currently less than 1% serve.

Now back when I was a kid it didn't matter if you were overweight. They were going to make you lose it. You might be recycled (started over in training) a couple of times but you were not going to be fat coming out of basic. By the time you completed basic you could run and march long distances carrying a ruck, wearing battle rattle and carrying a rifle.  Knowing how to shoot wasn't an issue either. They teach you that. I was the high shooter in my basic company. 2nd high was a guy from Chicago who had never fired a weapon in his life. Education isn't that important. From before I joined to now the military has raised and lowered standards depending on need. Could be anything from not completed high school to having to have graduated and GED wasn't good enough. At one time in the 80's 3 speeding tickets were a bar to enlistment. A few years ago they were talking about taking people who have served time in prison.

We do have what's called force multipliers. That is weapons that make each service member more effective than they were before. A good example is a repeating rifle opposed to a single shot. A Springfield O3A3 and stripper clips allows a person to fire 10-15 aimed rounds a minute opposed to 5-10 from a trap door. So the person with the O3A3 is 2 times as effective as the person with the trap door. The M1 Garand had a rate of fire of 40 rounds a minute. Again a force multiplier. So they are armed with assault weapons and so are we. Makes us about even there. They have a few mortars and rockets but supply issues.  We have excellent field artillery, surface to surface rockets and air to surface rockets. We also have good night vision equipment and much better field communications. So know we don't need as many "boots on the ground" to project combat power as we did years ago. But right now the military is pretty small and spread too thin as it is. 

Rick

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Exposure to combat. One the most striking statistics I've seen is the growth in that one. From WWII to Korea to Vietnam to today the concentration of more and more combat events on fewer and fewer frontline fighters has grown astronomically. I've seen this first hand with coworkers and my son's pere group. Two, three rotations,stop loss, activation of Gaurd and Reservists. Over and over. There is a human cost to force multipliers'. The load is not being carried equally. The level of cluelessness in our general society is staggering. I've personally had to place myself between combat vets and others who had no idea what buttons they were pushing. A draft or National service would help to spread the load. It would also place more people in our society with a clue to what's going on. That is definitely something that has been lost. No one has skin in the game anymore.

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My Godson is getting ready to deploy next week to Afghanistan as a Green Beret.  Scary, but I am very proud of him.  He was getting ready to get out and go to college since he had not been deployed except for multiple tours in South America.  He got accepted to Columbia University just before Thanksgiving and then found out his group was deploying on his way home from Thanksgiving pass.  He is excited, but the family is of course very concerned.  They had felt relieved when he made the decision to get out, so the deployment is weighing doubly hard on them now.  And with this weeks events they are even more tense.   They are very supportive, but also very worried.

On a cool note, one of his high school friends made him a combat knife to his specifications to take with him!

God bless all who serve and keep us safe at home.  That is what most Americans don't realize and take for granted.

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I couldn't think of a better way to make a military useless than to force recruitment of people who don't want to be there. I'd rather have a small army of people who wanted to do the job. Pretty insane that kids now can go die in a conflict that was started before they were born.

"Mission Accomplished" - 2003

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1 hour ago, Indy Farmer said:

I couldn't think of a better way to make a military useless than to force recruitment of people who don't want to be there. I'd rather have a small army of people who wanted to do the job. Pretty insane that kids now can go die in a conflict that was started before they were born.

"Mission Accomplished" - 2003

Must have had a "Merry Christmas" 

Oh, forgot, you don`t celebrate Christmas.

Nevermind.

 

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When I finished high school several years ago, I remember watching 4 years worth of classmates head off for a new life to serve our country...and they were an admirable group of men and women

I remember about half of them being kids who never seemed to take classes or sports seriously, but when it came to P.E. class or studying for the ASVAB test, man, they took that seriously

The other half were kids that challenged themselves with AP classes and personal development activities (like the Boy Scouts) and earned awards on several school sports teams and made it into some of the more prestigious military academies in the country

 

The level of devotion they all had to entering and serving in the military was incredible. I don't think the spirit a single person who willingly joins the military can be matched by a handful of unwillingly drafted soldiers, and for that, I'm grateful for these men and women

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