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Worst IH product you ever had ?

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We never had a IH product that was a complete dud.  Just some that maybe had a few flaws.  The worst maybe is our TD 14A which cracked the head twice and was somewhat common on the gas start diesels.  Great Grandpa did have a 600.  It might have been a dud because he only had it for a few years before trading to for a JD 830 in 1960.  Before that he had run IH since the 40s and he always kept a tractor longer than a few years.  I'm surprised at the 715 being listed.  Those were regarded as the best of the 15 series and the 815/915 were junk around here.  

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50T baler, same as problem as the above mentioned 55T. In alfalfa fairly decent.  Fresh wheat or oat straw it was terrible. If it was rained on once worked better. Dad usually rode on twine boxes. IH must of had premium twine in 50 and 60's, got a bale from the neighbor once to finish up. Off brand stuff. Refused to tie put IH in and worked decent again.  Also had the continental engine. If you killed it might as well wait an hour.  Next baler was NH 273

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nothing that i really couldnt deal with but the thing i disliked most was the hydra-touch tele depth control on the 560s we unhooked them both on ours. 

 

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715 D was my worst.  ran one for 10 years.  seemed like

there was always some going wrong.  they were a big pia

to work on.  the hydraulic pump was the worst.  had to work

over a hot exhaust manifold.  no room to work a wrench.

changing the front walk bearings, not fun.   the fuse panel was 

under the cab and exposed.  it was loud too.  the 810 head wasn't

much better.  my best day farming was when it went down the road.

ih 56 planter while it was an improvement over the 494A it still had piss

poor seed to soil.   

jmho

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If you think a 715 was bad to work on, you were never around a '00 or '20 Deere.

  

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On 12/29/2019 at 8:34 AM, Reichow7120 said:

IH 990 haybine.

First hay mower i ever ran. It seemed like that stupid thing was always broke down. It got to the point towards the end that you couldn't run a day without something breaking on it. Usually in the cutterbar or wobble gear area. Tried to figure out what was going on and we never did figure it out.

As another strike against the 990. 2 years ago we were loading a 990 onto a trailer for a neighbor to be scrapped out when a piece of it snapped allowing the mower to drop and swing its drawbar right on top of my foot. Broke a bunch of bones in my foot. I told Dad after that if i ever saw another 990 in my lifetime, it would be too soon.

715 is another good honorable mention in the junk category.

I have a 990 haybine for sale if you want to relive your childhood??!   Funny--ours was a solid performer.  It would sit outside all year, then just cut hay.  Never had problems with the wobblebox area...only things we ever worked on were skids that were simply worn thru, etc.   I'll probably end up scrapping it, nobody in my area does much hay anymore.

We spent more time working on the 1486 then I even want to consider.   Partly it was overweighted, partly the rear end casting was made wrong---the holes did not line up properly on the hydraulic main pressure line between the casting and the "pump plate".  After a lot of problems, I finally used a welder and die grinder to "move" the passageway in the casting so they were in alignment, and took the fluid out of the rear wheels....and actually got it to go 100+ hours between major teardowns!   It still ran hot all summer though.  The 4386 was a big improvement....if that helps classify our 1486 for durability!

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27 minutes ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

I have a 990 haybine for sale if you want to relive your childhood??! 

Not on your life. This is what my left foot looked like after the last time I was near a 990 loading it for scrap for a neighbor That foot talks to me when it gets cold and wet outside. I gimp a little then. So ill always have that little reminder of the 990 IH haybine.

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1969 model 815 combine.  304 gas V8.  Final drives went out each fall it seems. Almost 100% roller chain driven everything.  Always bad bearings, sprockets or worn out chains somewhere all the time.  Dad bought it new.  Best thing that ever happened to that machine was when it committed suicide by fire during 1976 wheat harvest.

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I often wondered why guys complained about IH balers even though they had a so so/ mixed  reputation  yet they still kept buying them ……… definition of insanity perhaps;)

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6 hours ago, Jeff-C-IL said:

I have a 990 haybine for sale if you want to relive your childhood??!   Funny--ours was a solid performer.  It would sit outside all year, then just cut hay.  Never had problems with the wobblebox area...only things we ever worked on were skids that were simply worn thru, etc.   I'll probably end up scrapping it, nobody in my area does much hay anymore.

We spent more time working on the 1486 then I even want to consider.   Partly it was overweighted, partly the rear end casting was made wrong---the holes did not line up properly on the hydraulic main pressure line between the casting and the "pump plate".  After a lot of problems, I finally used a welder and die grinder to "move" the passageway in the casting so they were in alignment, and took the fluid out of the rear wheels....and actually got it to go 100+ hours between major teardowns!   It still ran hot all summer though.  The 4386 was a big improvement....if that helps classify our 1486 for durability!

990 haybine junk? Well that's the first time I ever heard anyone say that,even JD/NH guys in my area know they were great dependable,cut anything machine.I had 2 both were great one was brand new on farm other used.I used them for many years,my brother had a NH he bought brand new,my old 990 would mow circles around him.He didn't like me mowing in same field with him,I would catch him and lap him when that NH489 would plug up.

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2 minutes ago, hillman said:

I often wondered why guys complained about IH balers even though they had a so so/ mixed  reputation  yet they still kept buying them ……… definition of insanity perhaps;)

The problem was the Mccormick knotter. We were a New Holland dealer as well as CIH. Our baler mechanic worked on countless balers a year and was an expert. The poor guy. Someone brought in an IH baler one day that he had bought on a sale. It would only tie maybe 10 bales at a time. Our mechanic was just about pulling his hair out. He finally figured out the knot was not going to look like a New Holland knot.

I think it was local dealer support that sold any IH baler. But look on craigslist or a machinery paper. There was probably 10 IHC dealers for every NH dealer in the day, but there conservatively speaking  30 NH balers to every 1 IHC baler. Not to mention JD.

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My thoughts on IH balers, yes always usually one knotter would tie perfectly and the other would miss 5 to 10 in a 100. Everything had to be perfect for the knotters to tie, good consistent twine, sharp twine knife, and everything adjusted properly. The IH baler pickups were better than JD and NH, my Dad tried an IH #46, JD 14T and NH balers in the same field on the same day and the JD and NH never missed a bale, the IH missed a couple bales but you could tell the windows that were baled by the JD by the amount of hay left in the ground. The NH would pick up the hay as well as the IH but it did not have the capacity of the IH.
The last two IH 430 and IH 435 balers my brother bought were with the "All Twine" knotters and I haven't had to work on a knotter since.  

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I am very aware of the McCormick and Deering knotters. and all the negativity towards IH balers but why do guys buy used ones years after their best before date or bought a second or third IH baler in the day and complain about them? seems like the terrible starting D282 and the rearends grenading everywhere on 560s even to this day. Just maybe reported worse than it actually was ?

 New Holland misses less bales simple as that. IH baler will work simple as that …...just "knot" as good ^_^

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4 hours ago, hillman said:

I often wondered why guys complained about IH balers even though they had a so so/ mixed  reputation  yet they still kept buying them ……… definition of insanity perhaps;)

I would ask the same question of the old Massey combine owners.  And yes we were one of them.

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On 12/29/2019 at 8:03 AM, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Dad had TWO #62 pull type combines to try to get over 40 acres of oats every summer. The little Continental 69 cid engine refused to start for 24 hours if shut off hot. The fabric canvas's tended to slip on the drive rollers, caused slugging and plugging, they didn't like weeds either. Had two because needed at least one spare of any part on weekends, and one cooling off to restart later.  Last IH combines we had. The #25 Deere just slightly better, and the #30 slightly better than the #25.

     The neighbor's #55-T baler on a bad day was a three man baler. Somebody on the tractor, somebody on the rack, and somebody sitting behind the knitters eating dust and tying missed knots.  When your whole baking crew is only 3 people you bale two loads and unload them, bale two more.  Other days it might miss 2-3-4 bales in a 1000 bale day.  Always heard great things about New Holland balers. Smaller bales than the 55-T but refused to miss tying a knot.

Uncle had 2 # 62 combines when I was a kid. Once started he never shut them off till the end of the day. When we stopped for lunch he left them running. Like you said, if engine died it wouldn't start till the next day. The canvases on those 6' heads sure didnt like horseweeds, would RIP right thru them. Always said those old canvases were the fore runners of today's Draper heads.

He had an IH baler with the Continental  engine as well. Dont remember the model #, but it was white with manual knitters. Had a seat back by the plunger for the man that worked the knitters. Had to be the dirtiest job on the farm. I remember he had a young man that had hurt a finger so he put the guy on the baler running the knotters. Guy had his hurt finger sticking out & got it in the plunger cutting the finger off. They wrapped the guys finger in a handkerchief & rushed him to the hospital where they ses it back on.  Finger lived but it was stiff the rest of his life. This was back in the early to mid '50s.

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Never really understood how knotters worked in the IH and McCormick balers until watching a couple films this past week about the #56 baler and 420, 30, and 40. Amazing how someone could come up with a system like that IMO

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6 hours ago, JD Humm said:

1969 model 815 combine.  304 gas V8.  Final drives went out each fall it seems. Almost 100% roller chain driven everything.  Always bad bearings, sprockets or worn out chains somewhere all the time.  Dad bought it new.  Best thing that ever happened to that machine was when it committed suicide by fire during 1976 wheat harvest.

Are there any left that didn't burn up??????

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21 minutes ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Never really understood how knotters worked in the IH and McCormick balers until watching a couple films this past week about the #56 baler and 420, 30, and 40. Amazing how someone could come up with a system like that IMO

What is amazing is this technology was first invented and put on the market in the 1880s and it worked.  

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For me the worst was a '75  & a '76 BS 1066 , both bought new along with a '77 1086 & a '81 1486, both bought used. The '75 1066 had transmission problems out of the factory, probably put less than 25 hrs on it the year I had it, was always in the shop. Traded it for the BS 1066. By the time it left the farm everything under the cab back of the tranny had been replaced, including housings.  The 1086 had 5 TAs put in it, one went out bringing the tractor home after having a new TA & clutch put in. 1486 was 2 yrs old when I bought it, traded the BS 10 on it, 10 was in pieces in dealers shop when I traded it for the 14 from another dealer. Talk about tense when the other dealer came to get it out of the other dealers shop.. The 14 had to have rear end bearings the 2nd year I owned it, less than 1,000 hrs on the tach. Also had 7 hyd pumps put in it before they finally found a pinhole in the pickup tube just below the "FULL" mark. 

 

 Got a '14 Magnum 315 that's giving those tractors a run for their money. Bought it in 2016 & so far have put over $20,000 in the mfd. Also has had the hyd remotes rebuilt 3x. Once last June & again this fall :÷((. Beginning to wonder if it isn't about time to look at a different colored tractor.

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not quite ih but I have a CaseIH 8820 swather what a piece of junk that thing was, hard to work on, parts incredibly expensive, partsman told me parts were getting difficult to get that was the last excuse I needed to get rid of it bought a wdx 1202, way better and comfortable machine to run 

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9 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

What is amazing is this technology was first invented and put on the market in the 1880s and it worked.  

IMO, the amazing thing is that today it would require a supercomputer and 3 engineering teams to figure out what somebody simply thought out and built (oh I'm sure there were some prototype steps) back then.  Those old guys were smart.

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