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Silo accident 2 dead and 11 year old in hospital


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58 minutes ago, MarkG said:

Wow. So sad. What kind of fumes are in a silo?

Maybe wet corn?

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1 hour ago, MarkG said:

Wow. So sad. What kind of fumes are in a silo?

Nitrogen dioxide.  From forage fermentation. Always and I mean ALWAYS run your blower before going back in the first time and if possible leave open the door just above the forage when done filling.  Silo gas settles on top and can sit there for a while in the right conditions.  If you don’t have time to hook up the blower, do you really have enough time for a funeral?  Prayer for the family.  Like said above it’s way to easy to get into trouble if your not extra careful 

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One of the deceased brothers was a friend of my nephew. The story he gave me was that they capped their concrete stave silos with plastic. The father of the boy and the boy were in the silo removing the plastic and were overcome by the gasses released when the pulled the plastic back and the the uncle died trying to get them both out of the silo. Brandon is about 30 miles south of us.

Very bad week for my nephew. Today he will attend the funeral of a close personal friend who died of health issues he's fought sense childhood. He was 33. And now of course this.

Rick

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I wondered if they were opening a capped silo when i read about the gas. I highly doubted that they were still filling silo at this point.

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6 hours ago, Bdse25 said:

Nitrogen dioxide.  From forage fermentation. Always and I mean ALWAYS run your blower before going back in the first time and if possible leave open the door just above the forage when done filling.  Silo gas settles on top and can sit there for a while in the right conditions.  If you don’t have time to hook up the blower, do you really have enough time for a funeral?  Prayer for the family.  Like said above it’s way to easy to get into trouble if your not extra careful 

                  Very Sad.      We Have 4 cement stave silos, 50'  60'  70' X 20'  also 100' X 30', All have roofs,    Our 50 & 60 foot silos are used for High moisture or Earlage.               After a Year of freezing rain harvesting, and blowing the wet ground earlage into the silo, we let the "Full to the top" fermented feed settle,  The weather stayed below freezing for the rest of the winter,  I had to level off the top of the silo so the top unloader would operate smoothly,   I ran the Silo Blower (Farmhand material handler) now hooked to the "BN" for 30 minutes, after the half hour wait, and the with the "BN" still running ,   I went up the inside shoot to the top door to observer the amount of material in the structure, the insuled earlage that had blown against the far side of the silo during filling,  Across from the silo pipe discharge area ( 20 feet away) was a mass of frozen Mush of kernels & Husks about a foot thick and 4 feet wide, stuck to the area that I needed the Silo unloader discharge shoot to exit.  The wooden silo doors were frozen solid to the cold concrete door frames.  This happens often,  the frozen material  on the inside of the silo had to be removed!  

 I have used different methods of frozen silage removal,   Axe,  pry bar, small shovel, pitchfork,  the quickest and fastest is a chainsaw!!! ( the old chains don't last long against concert silo walls)   This opening of this silo was no different,  [Procedure, start chainsaw before taking to the top, take warm chainsaw to frozen area] Begin!!

When I took the chainsaw inside the silo and standing on the earlage, I pulled the starter rope many times and nothing, checked fuel ,correct amount, went back down the silo, pulled the recoil and started immediately.

The Answer was "Not enough oxygen to run an internal combustion engine in a silo"  And we continue to enter and exit these things every day.

Anyway,  Be Safe,  Jim Droscha

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Sitting at christmas with my mother in law and sister in law saturday and the SIL's fiance's phone starts going nuts. 

Turns out the guy with the son was his old land lord, he moved out of his house and in with my SIL just a few months ago. He knew them very well and took it pretty hard. 

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More prayers to the family. 
Used to have a lot of training in working around silos , bins, pits etc.  An O2 level meter is a must when entering potentially hazardous atmosphere’s. Not cheap but life is worth far more.

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10 hours ago, MarkG said:

Wow. So sad. What kind of fumes are in a silo?

Others will, I'm sure, answer you but I just wanted to say that it was what we called "silo gas".  Was well known to us!

best, randy

 

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What a tragic accident. I'm always concerned about my grain bins. We run the fan for 10 minutes before going in and have 1 guy on the out side before entrance. Also have air tester which is so convoluted to operate.   Was going to send a donation. They have stopped accepting donations.

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Remember growing up too many deaths from manure pit/storage also. Usually family members trying to rescue one another.

We just received a $5000 donation from local bank for grain bin rescue equipment and training in how to use it.

Hope we never need it but will be good for local FD to have.

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23 minutes ago, sandhiller said:

Remember growing up too many deaths from manure pit/storage also. Usually family members trying to rescue one another.

We just received a $5000 donation from local bank for grain bin rescue equipment and training in how to use it.

Hope we never need it but will be good for local FD to have.

They just had an article about a man they saved in Minnesota out of a corn bin. It involved a backhoe and ripped the bin open. I don’t know if they used the culvert type deals then drained bin. About 3 years ago a young guy in North Dakota got killed outside the door of bin. 5 semiloads covered him when it let loose

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9 minutes ago, dale560 said:

They just had an article about a man they saved in Minnesota out of a corn bin. It involved a backhoe and ripped the bin open. I don’t know if they used the culvert type deals then drained bin. About 3 years ago a young guy in North Dakota got killed outside the door of bin. 5 semiloads covered him when it let loose

I posted a story on a young man killed in a grain bin accident the week before Thanksgiving where they gave him one **** of a funeral. 

Silos and grain bins are really unforgiving places so you better take care when you're working around them. 

My sympathies to the family 

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18 hours ago, Alan Dinan said:

Just tragic. Prayers for the family and the fire department. It's just as hard for the department loosing two of their own.

To work on members of your own crew and loose them is really tough.

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