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McCormick v. McCormick-Deering

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I'm certain I can't be the first person to ask this question, but is there a definitive authority on the McCormick branding versus the McCormick-Deering Branding? Also, International, etc?

I swear I see decals for letter series that call tractors "McCormick", "McCormick-Deering", and "International"... Is this something that would be in the Guy Fay book I asked for from Santa?

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Might be. I think i have read here there was a certain range of years they agreed to this or that labeling....

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you may be better served to check the Wis archives for actual advertising photos and decision times

IIRC   roughly   <  22-47' MCD   47-58 MC   '56 >  IH

more confusion was added when many suppliers of replacement decals  didnt look or specify the year of use

 IHC < 38'  and(2) IH after (gm designer) invented it.... will be another application ?

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I did look at my 1949 catalog and it appears that the decals for the C (my current project) say McCormick-Deering, but then again my C is a 1950, so I'm still not certain.

It's even more confusing because I think some of the Wheatlands (I think) said "International". I'm hoping Guy Fay sorts it out for me in the book, but was also hoping someone here had a primary source for it too.

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I know that when the various little companies combined to form the International Harvester company, that agreements were made to keep the McCormick and Deering family names on their products until the last direct family member died. 

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Only a marketing question : IHC is a worldwide organization, the company owns some brands & trade marks, and use them differently in the different countries where it exports or build directely through its subsidiaries.For American Domestic market, the real risk of  infrigement of the anti-trust law in the twenties drove IH to drop the distinct networks Mac Cormick and Deering, in order to use from now on an unique composed Brand (mc+D) In France, the two brands were sold separatly until 1947 ,using also the Brand Osborne and CIMA (for the ihc engines.Another example : All the tractors IH imported in Denmark brought the "Farmall" name typically, until the end of the fifties.What was the reason why ? "Farmall" name was particularly well known in this country, as Mac Cormick in France, the transition toward international brand  was a very slow process....the Brand Marketing is a science, inspired by the customers habits....

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My 1954 Super WD-9 has IH on the grill,my 1953 WD-9 has McCormick on it. 

IMG_20191211_140414837.jpg

IMG_20180710_075132610.jpg

Edited by kal
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A 52 Super M and a 52 Super W6

20190916_083051.jpg

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McCormick and Deering were bitter competitors. McCormick's bankers suggested they get together rather than beat each other up. So they did.  Ken

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A cousin had a 560 that said International on one side and Farmall on the other.

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Industrial tractors and power units were badged International. At the same time Ag tractors were called McCormick-Deering. The Farmall name came of course after the tractor in '23. The Deering name was dropped sometime during the letter series I believe. The McCormick and Farmall names were also dropped in favor of International. CaseIH brought the Farmall name back several years ago. Decals were originally available with whatever name the printer put on them, people may not have been as concerned about originality as they are today. After the Deering name was dropped, I don't think IH offered anything but McCormick decals. This would help explain why some tractors may have been repainted and the wrong decals installed. It probably boiled down to what was available. Today we have better choices for restoration. Sorry I'm not much help on the actual dates that the changes happened. The information is available and I have found it in several books. As far as different names on the same tractor, I assume that a hood panel was replaced with one from a tractor with a different name. I have seen early tractors that have the names cast into radiator tanks that were wrong. I assume that the radiator was replaced at some point. 

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I believe 1939 -1944 had McCormick-Deering.

From 1945 on had McCormick only.

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Another not so clear cut topic for sure. Fairly certain the McCormick-Deering front emblem was changed to McCormick after 1946. The lettering on the hood is a fun one. My '49 OS4 and ODS6 booth have the original lettering easily visible and booth were originally stenciled McCormick-Deering. My '51 OS6 is just McCormick. I even have a picture of the OS6 in its original state from the 1970's confirming the lettering. I will look in my book to see if there is any commentary on the subject. 

My own two cents, since there were far fewer W, O and I series tractors produced, I don't necessarily think they conformed to "rebadging" as quickly as the row crop models. 

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On 12/12/2019 at 7:07 AM, kal said:

My 1954 Super WD-9 has IH on the grill,my 1953 WD-9 has McCormick on it. 

IMG_20191211_140414837.jpg

IMG_20180710_075132610.jpg

Super series tractors had the "IH" badge on the grille regardless of model. The "Deering" name was phased out at the end the 1940s and the grille badge then read "McCormick" on the "pre-Super" W series models. 1953 was the last year for the "pre-Super" WD-9

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On 12/12/2019 at 6:31 AM, JEAN COINTE FRANCE said:

Only a marketing question : IHC is a worldwide organization, the company owns some brands & trade marks, and use them differently in the different countries where it exports or build directely through its subsidiaries.For American Domestic market, the real risk of  infrigement of the anti-trust law in the twenties drove IH to drop the distinct networks Mac Cormick and Deering, in order to use from now on an unique composed Brand (mc+D) In France, the two brands were sold separatly until 1947 ,using also the Brand Osborne and CIMA (for the ihc engines.Another example : All the tractors IH imported in Denmark brought the "Farmall" name typically, until the end of the fifties.What was the reason why ? "Farmall" name was particularly well known in this country, as Mac Cormick in France, the transition toward international brand  was a very slow process....the Brand Marketing is a science, inspired by the customers habits....

In Australia all our locally built tractors were sold as "McCormick International" from 1950. In Australia the W-6 was assembled here from 1948 from assemblies imported from the USA. Initially the tractors were called "McCormick-Deering" but by 1950 they were sold as "McCormick International" and had an "IH" badge on the grille. The stand alone "McCormick" name was never used on Australian built tractors. I have seen a late production US built W-9 here in Australia with a "McCormick"  name badge which would have been correct in North America too. The British built farm tractors were also labelled "McCormick International". Regards from Michael H.

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On 12/12/2019 at 6:31 AM, JEAN COINTE FRANCE said:

Only a marketing question : IHC is a worldwide organization, the company owns some brands & trade marks, and use them differently in the different countries where it exports or build directely through its subsidiaries.For American Domestic market, the real risk of  infrigement of the anti-trust law in the twenties drove IH to drop the distinct networks Mac Cormick and Deering, in order to use from now on an unique composed Brand (mc+D) In France, the two brands were sold separatly until 1947 ,using also the Brand Osborne and CIMA (for the ihc engines.Another example : All the tractors IH imported in Denmark brought the "Farmall" name typically, until the end of the fifties.What was the reason why ? "Farmall" name was particularly well known in this country, as Mac Cormick in France, the transition toward international brand  was a very slow process....the Brand Marketing is a science, inspired by the customers habits....

I have seen a picture of a British built McCormick International B-250 advertised in Denmark as a "Farmall B-250" now I know why!

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From what have been told McCormick Deering was used until sometime in 1946 on some of the letter series tha,then the IH logo was added to become IH McCormick Deering until 1949 when the Deering name was dropped. 

My early 1947 W4 still has McCormick Deering decals and it still is in original paint.

Marty,NZ 

IMG_20171009_174701.jpg

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McCormick, Deering, Milwaukee and three other machinery (largely reaper binders) firms combined to form the International Harvester Company (IHC) in 1902. IHC later acquired many other machinery manufacturers.  In 1917 there was an anti-trust action taken against the company as they were still having all the different dealers in towns giving the impression of competing against each other.  The court case was not decided until the First World War was over.  IHC was forced to sell some of the companies (Osborne etc) and to stop using some of the company names (Milwaukee binders effectively disappeared in the early 1920's)  In the very early 1920's IHC decided that in the USA all farm machinery would be McCormick-Deering (first binders 1923).  Up un til then they had been selling, McCormick, Deering and International etc. machinery as if they were independent companies. Post the change in the USA in other parts of the world they used McCormick-Deering, McCormick, Deering and International.  In New Zealand McCormick-Deering was used as the trade name. It must be noted that IHC's New Zealand 1930's price lists would not pass today's Race Relations Act by a very wide margin.  In the late 1930's IHC started to use International on the crawler tractors and industrial tractors.  The Farmall name was a trade name used by IHC for the row-crop from about 1926 for the Farmall (Farm All) tractor (later known as the Regular to distinguish it from the later F-30, F-20 and F-12) tractors but was not used by the standard wheeled tractors and the crawler tractors used the name TracTracTor.  Both the TracTracTor and Farmall tractors also carried the McCormick Deering brand name. The IH symbol first appeared on the hood side decals about 1944. In mid 1949 the Deering name was dropped and the tractors just became McCormick. The Farmall name was still used on the row-crop tractors.  The Farmall nameplate on the top of the grill disappeared on the introduction of the Farmall Super A (the only super feature was the touch-control hydraulics) and Farmall C at the very end of 1947.  The other IHC tractors got the IH badge on the front with the introduction of the Super series in 1951 (more power usually by using thinner sleeve liners or sleeves to get 1/8 th inch bigger bore.  The German built IHC tractors stopped using the Farmall name in 1958 (celebrating of 50 years of IHC in Germany) and the tractors were then known as McCormick International.

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On 12/15/2019 at 8:24 PM, o121937 said:

McCormick, Deering, Milwaukee and three other machinery (largely reaper binders) firms combined to form the International Harvester Company (IHC) in 1902. IHC later acquired many other machinery manufacturers.  In 1917 there was an anti-trust action taken against the company as they were still having all the different dealers in towns giving the impression of competing against each other.  The court case was not decided until the First World War was over.  IHC was forced to sell some of the companies (Osborne etc) and to stop using some of the company names (Milwaukee binders effectively disappeared in the early 1920's)  In the very early 1920's IHC decided that in the USA all farm machinery would be McCormick-Deering (first binders 1923).  Up un til then they had been selling, McCormick, Deering and International etc. machinery as if they were independent companies. Post the change in the USA in other parts of the world they used McCormick-Deering, McCormick, Deering and International.  In New Zealand McCormick-Deering was used as the trade name. It must be noted that IHC's New Zealand 1930's price lists would not pass today's Race Relations Act by a very wide margin.  In the late 1930's IHC started to use International on the crawler tractors and industrial tractors.  The Farmall name was a trade name used by IHC for the row-crop from about 1926 for the Farmall (Farm All) tractor (later known as the Regular to distinguish it from the later F-30, F-20 and F-12) tractors but was not used by the standard wheeled tractors and the crawler tractors used the name TracTracTor.  Both the TracTracTor and Farmall tractors also carried the McCormick Deering brand name. The IH symbol first appeared on the hood side decals about 1944. In mid 1949 the Deering name was dropped and the tractors just became McCormick. The Farmall name was still used on the row-crop tractors.  The Farmall nameplate on the top of the grill disappeared on the introduction of the Farmall Super A (the only super feature was the touch-control hydraulics) and Farmall C at the very end of 1947.  The other IHC tractors got the IH badge on the front with the introduction of the Super series in 1951 (more power usually by using thinner sleeve liners or sleeves to get 1/8 th inch bigger bore.  The German built IHC tractors stopped using the Farmall name in 1958 (celebrating of 50 years of IHC in Germany) and the tractors were then known as McCormick International.

It would be possible to write an essay on the whole "International" "Farmall" "McCormick-Deering" "McCormick" naming used by IH!                                                                                       The US built tractors used different names to give them a clear identity. "Farmall" was technically a model name rather a seperate brand and denoted a row crop or high clearance tractor.  Example - McCormick-Deering Farmall M and MV were row crop tractors whereas the standard tread W-6 or orchard O-6 models were simply called "McCormick-Deering". In that era the "International" was reserved for crawlers (T-6) industrial tractors (I-6) and power units (U-6). In many markets the crawlers and industrial tractors were sold through "IH Power Equipment" dealers and all IH construction equipment and attatchments were always branded "International" from the 1940s onwards. From the mid1950s the "International" name began being to be used on US farm utilities and standard tread tractors which were also sold as industrial tractors. This naming system was used up the US 56 Series tractors ( Farmall 656 row crop / International 656 utility etc.)    Here in Australia the "Farmall" name was played down. The Australian built "McCormick International Farmall A-514"  is usually refered to as the "International A-514" as there was no A-514 standard tread built. Regards from Michael H.  

P.S. Among all my IHC "junk" I have an end panel of a seed box from an IHC seed drill. It is labelled as "Deering" rather "McCormick-Deering"  I bought it on Ebay from Queensland and the seller had no idea of its age.

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I had to laugh at the time. Years ago I went to a mostly car museum that had a few tractors including a 15-30 parked inside. The sign said "A joint venture between McCormick and John Deere" I went to one of the museum people and told them that was not correct.

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20 hours ago, cedar farm said:

I had to laugh at the time. Years ago I went to a mostly car museum that had a few tractors including a 15-30 parked inside. The sign said "A joint venture between McCormick and John Deere" I went to one of the museum people and told them that was not correct.

If you Google "Deering" it says "Do you mean Deere"!

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On 12/12/2019 at 7:41 AM, Meltfms said:

A 52 Super M and a 52 Super W6

20190916_083051.jpg

Great photo! Two tractors built at almost the same time, both with wide front axles, but one is a McCormick Standard and the other a McCormick Farmall row crop. It shows the similarities and differences between the two different styles. From this point on the two styles started to blend. together       P.S. The Super W-6 must a 1952 model as it has the "tub" frame and the Super M must be slightly later as it has the steering arm behind the front axle. 

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2 hours ago, Michael Halsall said:

If you Google "Deering" it says "Do you mean Deere"!

barf

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I know for certain that my (built in May 1948) 1948 McCormick Deering O4 always had the "McCormick-Deering" plate on the front. But by the late 1960s when I got the tractor, you could no longer see the stenciling. Nonetheless, I have to assume it was "McCormick Deering" on the side as well. It's always been a question with my restoration...

Bob

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On 1/7/2020 at 6:16 AM, Michael Halsall said:

Great photo! Two tractors built at almost the same time, both with wide front axles, but one is a McCormick Standard and the other a McCormick Farmall row crop. It shows the similarities and differences between the two different styles. From this point on the two styles started to blend. together       P.S. The Super W-6 must a 1952 model as it has the "tub" frame and the Super M must be slightly later as it has the steering arm behind the front axle. 

The Super M has an aftermarket wide front axle on it.....

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