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Garage/shop/storage


Ihfan4life
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I’m considering building a garage/shop. I’m concerned about how big to build it. Yea, I know- bigger than I think I need! However where I wanna place it dictates that it needs to be scaled correctly.

With that said, I’m thinking something like a large 3 bay/ car garage with a loft and one bay larger than the others so as to get tractors and stuff in it. 

Any thoughts? 

 

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Like you said. Build it bigger than you think you need for the space you have to fit it into!  So many guys have made mistake of making it to small ?

For me - door placement is key - North wind in winter, crap coming down off roof and freezing in front of doors before you get home to clean it up, consider if you ever plan to add to it in future, power to it for lights & receptacles. What about a heavy enough beam to put up block & tackle?  If only storage, lighting isn’t so crucial, but if a shop, my two cents, don’t skimp on lighting to see what you are doing ?

Agree on the one larger bay though, very good idea!  What about windows up higher for natural light but not so low that people can see in them to see what good things you have to steal!

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I`ve never seen the point of making a shop so HIGH.

Yes, if you have a lot of high equipment etc. but all that space up there is wasted heat along with added expense to build so high.

My shop has 2 -10 ft high bays and 2 -14 ft high bays.

 

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40 minutes ago, MTO said:

I`ve never seen the point of making a shop so HIGH.

Yes, if you have a lot of high equipment etc. but all that space up there is wasted heat along with added expense to build so high.

My shop has 2 -10 ft high bays and 2 -14 ft high bays.

 

This is about right size for 1.5 people or even 2 working. The only reason you need height now is combines and if you work on large equipment( combines , big tractors , big construction). If you are autos and 1086 size tractor. 40 by 40 by 14 ft high or less if you have to. 12 ft high would be minimum so a car lift can be used efficiently.

 

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My shop is 36x72   More than large enough to have 3 tractors scattered all over and still get my pickup truck in.  (and the quad, lawn tractors, cutting table, collectables, junk microwave and beer refrigerator)   The only thing I would change is the door placement.   

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28 minutes ago, dale560 said:

This is about right size for 1.5 people or even 2 working. The only reason you need height now is combines and if you work on large equipment( combines , big tractors , big construction). If you are autos and 1086 size tractor. 40 by 40 by 14 ft high or less if you have to. 12 ft high would be minimum so a car lift can be used efficiently.

 

I have in my mind a 30 by 50 size building with maybe a loft over a 30*30 area? I was thinking maybe a small wood shop area in the loft but climbing stairs will stink after a while.

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7 minutes ago, gonzo 1066 said:

My shop is 36x72   More than large enough to have 3 tractors scattered all over and still get my pickup truck in.  (and the quad, lawn tractors, cutting table, collectables, junk microwave and beer refrigerator)   The only thing I would change is the door placement.   

Are all your doors on one side? I was thinking two smaller doors together than a pedestrian door than the larger door. But then I got to thinking about our camper, it would be nice to get that inside too?

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Just put something up, it is proven it will not be large enough or tall enough in short order.  I would have one 16' tall, but that is after being stuffed up against ceilings working on combines at various buildings in the area..........What was great for a 715 or 4400 doesn't work on a 1660 or 9600.  If I ever put one up next to the current hole in the wall, which in my advanced age and cheapness probably won't ever bother with, half the floor will be poured with extreme care to be flat with two I beams bubble level in the floor sitting it poured piers before the floor is poured.  I have gotten so sick of building large stuff over the years on sloped floors where you need to factor the slope into the measurements to get everything right. Other half will be sloped to a drain.  

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40 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

Just put something up, it is proven it will not be large enough or tall enough in short order.  I would have one 16' tall, but that is after being stuffed up against ceilings working on combines at various buildings in the area..........What was great for a 715 or 4400 doesn't work on a 1660 or 9600.  If I ever put one up next to the current hole in the wall, which in my advanced age and cheapness probably won't ever bother with, half the floor will be poured with extreme care to be flat with two I beams bubble level in the floor sitting it poured piers before the floor is poured.  I have gotten so sick of building large stuff over the years on sloped floors where you need to factor the slope into the measurements to get everything right. Other half will be sloped to a drain.  

Bubble level floors. A person can dream.

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Our shop is 50x60x16

It should be 18' high. The gantry I built had to clear the garage door tracks and light and now it's only slightly got 10+' of clearance under it. Also the safety prop won't quite go on the dump truck because the ceiling height is not quite high enough to have the bed up high enough for it. Building company talked me out of 16' high doors on an 18' building so we have 14x14' and a 22x14' door with 16' celings 

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52 minutes ago, dale560 said:

Bubble level floors. A person can dream.

That probably will be all it ever is................my old man was a concrete guy putting in inground pools growing up, I think he enjoyed making floors more complicated than he had too.  The hole in the wall here he formed and it has a center floor drain, slope steep enough you could sled ride down it from the corners...........he poured it, power troweled the heck out of it, then spread straw on it and kept the straw damp for 2 weeks so it would slow cure, cleaned the straw off and washed it and then sealed it. Looks like a plate of glass when its clean. The stupid thing is like a ice skating rink when anything liquid hits it, I have no idea what he was thinking.  

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i dont think you can overbuild on first attempt, maybe its because i have too much crap but i am always wanting more room. 

wish i would have built taller, only a 12' door wish i had a 14 so maybe i can just build another building LOL likely add onto the other end and then maybe insulate/heat it and put lift there. 

16' tall walls for 14' door = check

14 foot walls for 12 door = check

piers for lift = check

are you wanting clear span? you might have to get steel for anything over 40feet IIRC

how are you going to heat it? 

how are you going to insulate it? 

wiring for welders/large 220 stuff? 

automatic overhead doors? insulated? 

Water ? 

floor drains? 

many many things........

windows are of little use around here, too hot/rainy/cold to leave open much so just run a/c or heat  or dehumidifier in mine 

I like my windows for looking out but other than that they serve little purpose i get way more light from opening doors or overhead lighting

 

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Mine is admittedly too small but was dictated by the budget at the time. 12' ceilings, big windows, white ceilings with lots of lights, one lift bay, heavily insulated with insulated overhead doors from Garaga of Canada.

It's always heated to minimum of 60 and up to shirt sleeve if I want all on just about 300 gallons of fuel oil/year. I use a Miller mobile home heater with a cottage base.Has unheated second floor that I've never finished off. It's just a low priority but is good dry storage. 11' lift bay door is tall enough for anything I need to bring in.

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Had this built, was supposed to be 40x66, ended up 36x66. It works. Two left side doors, non heated, storage. Very left door 13 high for rv, the rest are 12. Right side, heated, 36x40, 10x12 and 16x12 doors, reznor 150,000 btu furnace, plus a crapper and beer fridge. Allow for work benches taking up space. Should have been bigger, 40x70, but I can get my farm stuff in for repairs. I have a 3 car garage to take the pressure off. Yeah I know, it only has 2 doors, but you can put stuff between the cars. Got the 88 in right now for some work. Had to move some stuff to the other side.

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One big mistake I made, well, besides being too small, is building on a floating slab. The only problem is the snow and slush that comes in has nowhere to go but puddle. Building inspector/code won't allow floor drain without grease and oil trap. If I had built it on a frost wall for maybe a grand more, I could have pitched the floor to send the melt to the doors.

Benches, compressor, welders, cabinets seem to take lots of space.

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1 hour ago, New Englander said:

One big mistake I made, well, besides being too small, is building on a floating slab. The only problem is the snow and slush that comes in has nowhere to go but puddle. Building inspector/code won't allow floor drain without grease and oil trap. If I had built it on a frost wall for maybe a grand more, I could have pitched the floor to send the melt to the doors.

Benches, compressor, welders, cabinets seem to take lots of space.

Are you talking full footings or just knee walls? That seems to be a common complaint, not building higher than existing elevation of the existing ground. I figure you need to build about a foot higher than what’s already there then it’s not in a hole.

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18 minutes ago, Ihfan4life said:

Are you talking full footings or just knee walls? That seems to be a common complaint, not building higher than existing elevation of the existing ground. I figure you need to build about a foot higher than what’s already there then it’s not in a hole.

Good thought. Drive up to building not down.

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Big fan of say 16 to 18 tall that way you can have 9 foot ceiling and a full loft over top of half for all the stuff...junk, compressor, water heater, heat, tractor parts, wife's crap etc.

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If your going to heat, I recommend radiant floor heat. Have it installed by a company that knows what they are doing. It is expensive compared to forced air. It cost about 4-6 dollars per square foot on average here in Indiana. It will pay for itself in the long run. 

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I only go through 400 gals propane keeping my shop 55 and bumping it up when need to, about 6 months worth, of course I am r30 ish walls, r40 ish ceilings, uphill side is 4 feet in the ground.

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42 minutes ago, mader656 said:

Big fan of say 16 to 18 tall that way you can have 9 foot ceiling and a full loft over top of half for all the stuff...junk, compressor, water heater, heat, tractor parts, wife's crap etc.

What’s this “junk” you speak of? Isn’t it all very valuable treasures waiting to be restored (discovered)?!

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57 minutes ago, cobfly said:

I only go through 400 gals propane keeping my shop 55 and bumping it up when need to, about 6 months worth, of course I am r30 ish walls, r40 ish ceilings, uphill side is 4 feet in the ground.

Where do you live? But true your insulation pays for itself many times over. Plus a good insulated building isn’t drafty

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2 minutes ago, exSW said:

I say this every time. I said this every time when I was building. Build it as wide as you can afford. You can ALWAYS make it longer. Nobody listened. I went back and built a lot of lean to additions.

Our shop is 60' (clearspan) wide by 50' deep. We want to add something for more space. Lots of dirt will have to move to go any further back. Front maybe possible but it will reduce the outside accessablity . We are contemplating additional 20' wide on the one side. It's all in the dream stages currently. It would replace the storage trailers we have on the ground. This idea should displace the large family of skunks that live under the trailers :(

We added a loft to the right side of the shop over the man door entrance by 50' long. We are possibly adding one on the back wall for more parts storage. Currently our parts storage has gotten awfully unorganised and often hard to find a stocked part 

pic shows shop labeled, commodity shed above it , old shop to the right of the commodity shed. Fortunately we have cleaned up much of the outside space since this picture was taken

IMG_20191210_202414.jpg

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