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Unknown drainage location/type


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Hey guys! 

I have inherited my grandfathers old gas British built b414. After doing a walk around I noticed this group of 3 holes plugged with cork (grandfather was a marine engineer and always tried to fix everything with only what he had). Within my picture I have attached, can someone please tell me what these holes drain and where one can acquire the proper plugs?

AFA891B0-7F7D-441F-B8E9-6AA2163BD76B.jpeg

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Common practice to plug implement mounting holes with cork or something to keep dirt/grease/trash form pluging up threads when not in use. They may not be drains at all, in fact I'm betting not. I dont know much about a 414 tho so others will chime in too I'm sure.

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Interesting I’m really surprised, so IH used cork as a plug? This is a 1964, would they still have done this on this particular model year? 

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24 minutes ago, IHSteve said:

Interesting I’m really surprised, so IH used cork as a plug? This is a 1964, would they still have done this on this particular model year? 

Yes...

Travis

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This is great thank you! The corks do currently leak oil, is this also normal? 

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1 minute ago, IHSteve said:

This is great thank you! The corks do currently leak oil, is this also normal? 

Those are in bottom of bell housing. Either engine or tranny is leaking. Leak needs to be fixed or clutch will be oiled.

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Or they have been leaking a tiny bit for 50 years, and will continue to leak, without ever getting serious enough to hurt anything.  Clean the entire area, then stare at it for a while, check back every day or so. If it doesn't make a puddle in a few days..... I think I'd ignore it.

welcome to the forum 

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16 minutes ago, stronger800 said:

Or they have been leaking a tiny bit for 50 years, and will continue to leak, without ever getting serious enough to hurt anything.  Clean the entire area, then stare at it for a while, check back every day or so. If it doesn't make a puddle in a few days..... I think I'd ignore it.

What he said. The only thing I would add is to start it and let it run a bit. See how bad it is leaking before you get nervous 😬 

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Hi @IHSteve

 

I can confirm to you those holes are there to hold the U shape axle support for the ones equipped with Power steering.

The oil you see is most likely coming from a leak above, but it could also be coming form the clutch area. I encourage you to removed the clutch inspection plate to the right on your picture. there is just 4 bolts holding in and no gasket, that  is supposed to be a dry area. When i first got my B414. i had a sweat coming from that inspection panel. i found a bunch of oil/water mix in there that was spilling over from the over filled transmission. I was lucky the level did not reach the clutch.  the transmission oil had not been changed in years and lots of moisture had build up over the years causing the oil level to go up in the transmission. once i drained about 7 gal of excess liquid out of the transmission, the leak stopped and has never returned. i then took the time to replace the oil in the rear end. 

I have gone deep into this tractor in the recent years. feel free to ask me any questions. I know it inside and out pretty well now.

 

Al

 

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5 hours ago, IHSteve said:

Hey guys! 

I have inherited my grandfathers old gas British built b414. After doing a walk around I noticed this group of 3 holes plugged with cork (grandfather was a marine engineer and always tried to fix everything with only what he had). Within my picture I have attached, can someone please tell me what these holes drain and where one can acquire the proper plugs?

AFA891B0-7F7D-441F-B8E9-6AA2163BD76B.jpeg

All the older tractors we purchased back in them days had cork in the threaded holes either because the holes were drilled clear thru to the clutch area to prevent dirt entry or to simply keep the dirt out of the threads for future attachments

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